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Mamoth DNA merged with Elephant.

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posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 01:51 PM
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Of course, if they do successfully resurrect the Mammoth, which would be cool, I won't lie, there are then some further considerations:

1.) Is it a one-off or do they try to recreate a genetically viable population?

2.) If so, what do they do with it?

3.) What does it need to eat? Are the diets preserved in the bellies of frozen mammoth enough to help us feed it with modern foliage?

4.) What about habitat? Do we have enough habitat of the required type to give a self-sustaining population enough range?

5.) What would be the impact on the modern ecology and ecosystem? Would mammoth become an invasive species and thus would they always have to remain in captivity or could they viably become part of the tundra scene again?




posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 02:07 PM
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I wonder if they are including size in their splice (weren't they close to twice the size and weight of elephants), and if they are, have they considered that it might be too big to survive?

Does anyone here know of any other land animal with the same mass as the mammoth?

Or, what has been the largest land animal since the mammoth went extinct?

Am I completely off base? Would it lead a healthy life? And in playing with mother nature, do we see or just ignore the possibility of extraordinarily negative outcomes?



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 02:10 PM
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a reply to: lagnar

I don't think the size would be a problem except that something about the Ice Age led to megafauna because the ecosystem was enormously productive, so it might have problems feeding itself in terms of sheer biomass.

Again, another consideration.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 03:16 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

They only went extinct about ten thousand years ago. I'm pretty sure what they ate is still growing today. Remember they survived during the ice age so there was probably less green things for them to eat than there would be now. Unless they ate dodo birds and saber tooth tigers lol.
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posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 03:16 PM
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# like this is how you get a bammat infestation. Took forever to kill those things off the first time.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

I know I'm going to be sorry for asking but what's a bammat?



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: canucks555

For the love of christ, do this already,

I have been waiting 2 freaking decades for this,

This has become like the flying cars promised in the 50s

I want to see one before I die



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 03:20 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

The mega fauna was in the Jurassic era and earlier. The ice age would have left little in the way of growing things so we really should wonder what they ate. Pine trees and other sturdy trees were probably a part of their diet. Tiny plants like those of the tundra were probably around too.
edit on 3232015 by AutumnWitch657 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 03:23 PM
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originally posted by: AutumnWitch657
a reply to: Bedlam

I know I'm going to be sorry for asking but what's a bammat?


The Cherokee and Creeks believed that there was a creature in the Appalachians. Two or three people high at the shoulder, with big curly horns, and covered with hair, with a snake for a nose. They would kill you if they could trap you. And they were smart...they'd herd you to a tight spot and have a bammat hiding there waiting for you.

We used to hear about bammats from our great grand parents as kids. They're supposedly all gone now. All we need is more of the damned things.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 03:58 PM
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Wow, there's a milestone for species preservation! I can't really think of any particular species, be it extinct or damn close to it, that deserves the First In Line honor above the others, the fact that we're pretty close to being able to do it & thus fix what we broke in terms of biodiversity is what should speak for itself. If we can at least bring back species we had direct responsibility for destroying, it's a step in the right direction for bringing balance back. We can't just splice or clone & call it done, though, we need to work on habitat rehabbing & preservation, too. Kind of all for naught when the habitats are crap or don't exist.
In the future, when (and I doubt this is an If thing) we get to the point of having large numbers of animals once extinct brought back, I think it's going to be a sign that we're on the right track as a species ourselves as far as righting our wrongs & respecting the planet goes.


originally posted by: NthOther

The animal's life would be horrendous, consisting entirely of being drugged, caged, poked, prodded and photographed. Why would anyone create life just to torture it?


Well hey, ask a Christian exactly this about their god's crap antics towards humans & you get bashed hard for the mere thought.
That is not to say what's good for a god is good for a human (not the argument) Just an interesting mirror to consider because this is a good segue for that kind of pondering.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 04:17 PM
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a reply to: AutumnWitch657

Mammoths, Mastodons, wooly rhinos etc... Are all considered megafauna as are modern animals such as Asian and African Elephants, hippos and modern rhinos. Megafauna isn't a term restricted to specific periods of
earths history, it's a descriptor usually reserved for land animals that are larger than humans and weighing roughly 200lbs or more.

No dodo's or smilodons were eaten by mammoths lol. Their diet consisted of grass and sedges which were grasslike flowers. It's a common misconception that Mammoths lived in a frozen wasteland. Their primary habitat would be the equivalent to today's Russian Steppes but the flora was more diverse, abundant, and grew faster. Grasses, sedges, shrubs, and herbaceous plants were present, and scattered trees were mainly found in southern regions. This habitat was not dominated by ice and snow, as is popularly believed, since these regions are thought to have been high-pressure areas at the time.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 04:44 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

I thought you were setting up a joke. Like those damn henways. Then you ask what's a henway I say oh three or four pounds.
Thanks for the folk lore tale. Since the Adirondacks are populated with mostly scotch Irish I wonder if there is a similar tale in Ireland or Scotland.
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posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 04:46 PM
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I was thinking flora lol. Giant plants. Poisonous Venus fly traps and such. Sorry. a reply to: peter vlar



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: peter vlar

The part about the dodos was my idea of a,joke. I'm gonna have to work on that.
By your description I had a dog who was a mega fauna. A200lb Newfoundland who could carry a basket ball in his mouth.
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posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: AutumnWitch657

No, I got the joke. Apparently it was my reply that was somewhat lost in translation. And as ridiculous as it sounds, by the strict definition your Newfy (I've got a landseer Newfoundland myself) would be considered megafauna. It's because if seems as ridiculous as you and I find it that the term is generally reserved for the larger examples I have such as modern day elephants, hippos and rhinos. If it makes you feel any better, I finished my bachelors in Anthropology and still got flora and fauna mixed up lol



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 07:02 PM
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a reply to: NthOther

eh i doubt that i DO see mammoth burgers being a thing for the first time in 10,000+ years though ,mammoths could feed alot of people and that is where i see this going not necessarily just the sad zoo route ,of course peta would go absolutely nuts about it but who knows



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 07:12 PM
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Not quite really sure how to feel about cloning



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 07:35 PM
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originally posted by: danevapo
Not quite really sure how to feel about cloning


Do you like bananas?



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 07:39 PM
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The Jurassic park scenario makes sense.
If they create just a few to study then they can create their surroundings easily enough.
A little island off of Alaska maybe, it's doable.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 09:43 AM
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See my mistake was I thought flora and fauna meant flowers and plants. I never considered animals and I've thought this for a long long time so see you can teach an old dog .
Thanks for the lesson. The real funny thing is that although not a formal education I've studied plants and animals just because I have a keen interest in nature and in gardening and herbs both in the wild and in my little herb plot.
I have no problem being wrong especially when some kind soul can point it out without being condescending. Like yourself. Thanks again.

a reply to: peter vlar



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