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Mamoth DNA merged with Elephant.

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posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 01:15 AM
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A major step forward in bringing back the woolly mammoth has been taken by scientists at Harvard University who have inserted DNA from the extinct mammal into the genetic code of an elephant. Geneticists have studied DNA from mammoths which were preserved in Arctic permafrost looking for genes which separated them from elephants, such as hairiness and ear size. They then replicated the genes and spliced them into the genetic code of an elephant where they functioned normally.




George Church, professor of genetics at Harvard University, used a new technique which allows scientists to make precision edits to DNA, replacing sections of elephant DNA with the mammoth genes. "We prioritised genes associated with cold resistance including hairiness, ear size, subcutaneous fat Prof Church told The Sunday Times.


www.telegraph.co.uk...

One step closer folks

Though I guess there are people who believe it wouldn't be a good thing. A cloned Mamoth would most likely lead a crappy life in this day and age...
edit on 23-3-2015 by canucks555 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 01:17 AM
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Great, we'll bring back an ice-age creature from extinction just in time for it to drown in the rising sea levels.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 01:22 AM
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a reply to: Blackmarketeer

I agree, This stuff is purely for scientific purposes.
-also the Wow factor.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 01:23 AM
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a reply to: canucks555

Dr. Ian Malcolm: God creates dinosaurs. God destroys dinosaurs. God creates man. Man destroys God. Man creates dinosaurs.
Dr. Ellie Sattler: Dinosaurs eat man. Woman inherits the earth.

~Jurassic Park



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 01:25 AM
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a reply to: canucks555

What if it led to the rise of mutant freaks? I mean we have a ton of movies that covers this particular scenario like Jurassic Park as mentioned with another poster.
edit on 23-3-2015 by starwarsisreal because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 01:28 AM
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What if it led to the rise of mutant freaks? I mean we have a ton of movies that covers this particular scenario like Jurassic Park as mentioned with another poster.

They'd just tell us that the Mammoth died from airborne viruses.

They'd leave out the part about it eating the scientific crew and the animal trainers before it got a cold....



edit on 23-3-2015 by canucks555 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 01:29 AM
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Now we need to implant that sucker.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 01:59 AM
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originally posted by: Blackmarketeer

Great, we'll bring back an ice-age creature from extinction just in time for it to drown in the rising sea levels.

Scientists don't think these ethical things through sometimes.

The animal's life would be horrendous, consisting entirely of being drugged, caged, poked, prodded and photographed. Why would anyone create life just to torture it?

It's quite disturbing. But they will arrogantly (and most incorrectly) proclaim that "scientific discovery" justifies all of it.

Balderdash.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 02:08 AM
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a reply to: NthOther

It's nice of you to be able to predict the future. How about once perfected the technique may be able to be used to help species near extinction from becoming extinct.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 02:16 AM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

It's nice of you to be able to predict the future. How about once perfected the technique may be able to be used to help species near extinction from becoming extinct.

So I suppose the half-mammoth-half-elephant monster is going to go live in half-mammoth-half-elephant monster-land, happily ever after?

No. It's going to spend it's life in a laboratory with fake ficus trees. Men in white coats are going to inject it with chemicals and most likely eventually kill it. It doesn't have a "home" to go to. It can't be simply "released into the wild".



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 02:23 AM
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a reply to: NthOther

There is plenty of habitat left. Mammoth and Elephant DNA is very similar, so it will not be half and half when they are done, it will be very close to the actual Mammoth. Mammoths are not millions of years old, they died out very recently. I would imagine they could do very well in places like Alaska.

Why on Earth do you think they would inject it with chemicals and do these weird experimentations? They could simply do them on Elephants, can you explain why they would do them?
edit on 23-3-2015 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 09:49 AM
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a reply to: starwarsisreal

Don't worry. No need to suspend disbelief for the real world.

edit on 3232015 by AutumnWitch657 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 09:51 AM
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Let's safely assume that mammoths are herbivores like elephants. a reply to: canucks555



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 09:56 AM
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I wish they'd use their scientific smarts to bring back an animal that went extinct directly because of man's interventions instead, like the thylacine, which they have perfectly intact DNA of.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 09:58 AM
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If they say they have successfully combined the DNA doesn't that mean that somewhere there is already an elephant pregnant with a wooly mammoth?



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 10:02 AM
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Why do you think that? What could they possibly learn from the animal (not monster) that they can't learn from an elephant?


y to: NthOther



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 10:13 AM
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originally posted by: AutumnWitch657
If they say they have successfully combined the DNA doesn't that mean that somewhere there is already an elephant pregnant with a wooly mammoth?


No, not necessarily. It's more likely that they have combined the genomes in the lab like you would fertilize a human egg with human sperm for in vitro fertilization. It's how most of the early cloning experiments were done in the 90's. They would only low a limited number of cell division before terminating the excercise.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 10:22 AM
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originally posted by: NthOther

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

It's nice of you to be able to predict the future. How about once perfected the technique may be able to be used to help species near extinction from becoming extinct.

So I suppose the half-mammoth-half-elephant monster is going to go live in half-mammoth-half-elephant monster-land, happily ever after?

No. It's going to spend it's life in a laboratory with fake ficus trees. Men in white coats are going to inject it with chemicals and most likely eventually kill it. It doesn't have a "home" to go to. It can't be simply "released into the wild".


I'm trying to read your post without looking at your avatar, LOL.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 11:01 AM
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a reply to: peter vlar

In those early experiments most of the cloned sheep zigots died without any help and were never implanted in a living ewe. Once they got one that survived multiple divisions they implanted the egg and we eventually got Dolly.
If they say they have successfully inserted the mammoth DNA into an elephant cell they must have had enough division to call it a success. If they have not yet implanted a zigot into an elephant cow they soon will. By next spring we could see the reintroduction of the wooly mammoth.
Question concerning size. How much bigger were the mammoths in comparrison to the African elephant. I believe they are the bigger of the two species of elephant now existing.
Would an African cow be able to carry a mammoth infant to term and successfully deliver it?



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 11:04 AM
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That's ganesh an Indian God.

Or a facsimile there of anyway.

a reply to: Blackmarketeer



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