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Researchers get a photo of endangered mammal for the first time in 20 years

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posted on Mar, 22 2015 @ 08:43 PM
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Species was first discovered in 1983 and has been rarely seen since.





Say hello to the Ili Pika. This species is closely related to rabbits and hares and makes it's home in the cracks and holes in the cliffs of the Tian Shan Mountains of China. There is another kind of Pika living across the Northern Hemisphere but this kind makes it's home only here. although scientists know where to find it, it's very difficult to get it on camera.



Then, last summer, the man who originally discovered the species in '83, Weidong Li, had a chance encounter with the elusive creature. He and a group of researchers were out in the Tianshan Mountains for, what else, pika spotting, when around noon they saw one and snapped the iconic picture above.

Over the last decade, the Ili pika population has continued to decline by an estimated 55%.

The reason for their dwindling numbers isn't clear, but Smith suspects it's related to disease, increased nearby human activity, and/or climate change.


These are such incredibly beautiful animals. I hope we are able to learn more about them and are able to save them from extinction, if possible. Hopefully staying away from humans gives it a chance of survival, but that's just me being hopeful and optimistic. Somehow though, I doubt that this will be the only thing for it's survival. Us not mucking up the planet anymore might go a long way would help as well.




posted on Mar, 22 2015 @ 09:01 PM
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OMG, how adorable! They should try breeding a few pairs on a reserve somewhere then release them back into the wild. It would be a shame to lose such a beautiful little creature.



posted on Mar, 22 2015 @ 09:25 PM
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a reply to: Night Star


They should try breeding a few pairs on a reserve somewhere then release them back into the wild.

Leve the critters alone. They made it this far without meddlesome humans.

Now 10,000 tourists will flock there and be the first to get one on camera and sell it to Nat Geo … stressing out the few that are left.

Wildlife should remain wild.



posted on Mar, 22 2015 @ 09:30 PM
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So sweet
Is this where Pikachu comes from?



posted on Mar, 22 2015 @ 10:33 PM
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originally posted by: Night Star
OMG, how adorable! They should try breeding a few pairs on a reserve somewhere then release them back into the wild. It would be a shame to lose such a beautiful little creature.



I agree, sadly there's no conservation program in place for this little guy, which surprised me if it's endangered. Maybe since it's so hard to photograph, it's also very hard to find to capture to put into a breed and release program?



posted on Mar, 22 2015 @ 10:36 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Night Star


They should try breeding a few pairs on a reserve somewhere then release them back into the wild.

Leve the critters alone. They made it this far without meddlesome humans.

Now 10,000 tourists will flock there and be the first to get one on camera and sell it to Nat Geo … stressing out the few that are left.

Wildlife should remain wild.



I understood what she was saying Intrptr, these Ili Pika, are dwindling without our help or interference. They will continue to dwindle. Her idea is to try and bring the numbers back up to what they were, which is understandable. Perhaps if they reach a certain level, scientists may just do a breeding program, but for now are taking a "wait and see" approach.



posted on Mar, 22 2015 @ 10:47 PM
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originally posted by: Autorico
So sweet
Is this where Pikachu comes from?



Why yes I believe it is!




posted on Mar, 22 2015 @ 11:03 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Night Star


They should try breeding a few pairs on a reserve somewhere then release them back into the wild.

Leve the critters alone. They made it this far without meddlesome humans.

Now 10,000 tourists will flock there and be the first to get one on camera and sell it to Nat Geo … stressing out the few that are left.

Wildlife should remain wild.

That's great, until they are all gone, and you say damn why didn't we breed some when we had the chance.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 12:45 AM
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The rare Himalayan rabbit-puppy.
Most vicious beast known to man.
Don't let the cuteness fool you.
edit on 23-3-2015 by skunkape23 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 03:00 AM
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These 'Coneys' or Pikas look real cute. Never really thought about where the word 'Pikachu' came from... now I know!



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 03:22 AM
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They are in the rabbit 'family", helps make them cuter(yes, I'm biased!).

For the preservation.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 07:43 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04


That's great, until they are all gone, and you say damn why didn't we breed some when we had the chance.

You mean chase them down, put them in cages and charge people to see them at zoos, right?



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 07:51 AM
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Tanukis ! Anyone has seen Pompoko ?



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 08:42 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: OccamsRazor04


That's great, until they are all gone, and you say damn why didn't we breed some when we had the chance.

You mean chase them down, put them in cages and charge people to see them at zoos, right?



No one said anything about putting them in zoos. Some of us are concerned about the dwindling numbers and some kind of conservation program would be to the animals benefit. They would eventually be released back into the wild in greater numbers.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 08:59 AM
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originally posted by: Night Star

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: OccamsRazor04


That's great, until they are all gone, and you say damn why didn't we breed some when we had the chance.

You mean chase them down, put them in cages and charge people to see them at zoos, right?



No one said anything about putting them in zoos. Some of us are concerned about the dwindling numbers and some kind of conservation program would be to the animals benefit. They would eventually be released back into the wild in greater numbers.

I know you mean well, Night Star.

Captive bred animals don't usually survive when released into the wild.

Its a death sentence for them because they were bred and raised captive.

Ultimately they are sold to zoos and other animal venues for profit and caged for life.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: skunkape23

Funny, I thought the same thing. Sure it looks cute, but will probably eat your face off.


And as far as trying to save them, wouldn't the best idea be to create a preserve, around the area they are known to be in, and just not let anyone in there?

Set up cameras around the perimeter and let them be.



posted on Mar, 23 2015 @ 01:24 PM
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I saw that photo and thought I was looking at something straight out of the Jim Henson creature shop.

But I know why it's endangered ... it's learning the hard way that you cannot "cute" things to death to defend yourself.




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