It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Curiosity rover may have found fatty acid on Mars in "wet chemistry" experiment

page: 1
9

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 20 2015 @ 09:42 AM
link   
We have water , methane spikes and now a possible discovery made be NASA scientists courtesy of Curiosity's SAM instrument of a long-chain carboxylic acid, or fatty acid which is exciting scientists because fatty acid is a key component that makes up cell membranes , although they have been quick to point out that there are other non-biological explanations for the result.

Nevertheless it comes as interesting news for those of us who believe life did and still does exist on the red planet , small steps lead to giant leaps.

The results come from Curiosity's SAM instrument, and were presented at the 46th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) in Texas.
Nasa scientist Daniel Glavin described the results from the first "wet chemistry" experiment carried out by Curiosity.
A long-chain carboxylic acid, or fatty acid, was a good fit for one of the data peaks detected in a mudstone called Cumberland, he told an audience at the meeting. A form of alcohol molecule may also be among the compounds analysed.
www.bbc.co.uk...



edit on 20-3-2015 by gortex because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 20 2015 @ 09:59 AM
link   
a reply to: gortex

Yay Drunk alien Vomit !!!!

were there any alien pizza, or dorrito molecules found too? IF so they maybe closer to us than we think.....

LOL

In all seriousness though, what if life is like a photon? In a state of all states until it's observed... Then it begins to thrive, and flourish? When it develops it's own consciousness it can become it's own catalyst.



posted on Mar, 20 2015 @ 10:39 AM
link   
a reply to: gortex

It is such a long and winding excursion for them to take us on to acknowledge the fact that the Viking experiments in the mid-1970s already found evidence of life on Mars. But that would have been too soon. I'll bet many of the younger set here have no knowledge of that fateful mission. But then, that was before they got serious on the subjected and embarked on finding remote planets that are earth-like, etc. It is all a carefully orchestrated plan, folks, done in safe incrementals. They could tell you tomorrow the whole truth of UFOs and related details if they were inclined. But the time isn't right just yet. You are not quite ready.
edit on 20-3-2015 by Aliensun because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2015 @ 03:43 PM
link   
a reply to: gortex

I am glad too that they seem now to be keeping an open mind and not like so many on ATS that keep shouting "LIFE WITHOUT WATER IS IMPOSSIBLE!" There could be many other ways for life to exist than what we are used to here on earth we need to look for all.



Only Earth is known to host life, and life on our planet requires water. Though life could conceivably evolve without relying on this precious liquid, scientists can only work with what they know.

www.space.com...



Although it's conceivable that azotosomes could be produced amid Titan's cryogenic conditions, the real point of the research is to suggest that planets beyond our solar system need not have water to have life.

www.nbcnews.com...



posted on Mar, 20 2015 @ 04:03 PM
link   

originally posted by: gortex

Although they have been quick to point out that there are other non-biological explanations for the result.


Aren't they always quick to point that out?


I guess we're more and more being confronted with the fact that some form of life once existed on Mars and - perhaps - still exists there today ... somewhere, isolated, perhaps underground. I wouldn't even be too surprised if one of these days something like that would make headlines (although it would be major news, no doubt about it).

Interesting topic, I will certainly keep an eye on this - thanks for sharing!



posted on Mar, 21 2015 @ 02:22 AM
link   
a reply to: gortex

Interesting times fellow Knight !

Expedience in the reporting of significant finds - to us plebs ... ?

Maybe later?


Dunno ...



posted on Mar, 21 2015 @ 02:46 AM
link   
Not to be "that guy" but isn't that a little too convenient?



posted on Mar, 21 2015 @ 05:18 PM
link   
a reply to: Thorneblood




isn't that a little too convenient?

How so ?
From my understanding of the article they have a reading that could indicate the presence of a fatty acid although there are other possible explanations for the result , they aren't saying it's one or the other just it's an interesting result.

Personally I'd like to think that it is an indication of biology but until they eliminate the other possible causes we can only guess , hope and wait for more data.


edit on 21-3-2015 by gortex because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2015 @ 08:04 PM
link   

originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: gortex

It is such a long and winding excursion for them to take us on to acknowledge the fact that the Viking experiments in the mid-1970s already found evidence of life on Mars. But that would have been too soon. I'll bet many of the younger set here have no knowledge of that fateful mission. But then, that was before they got serious on the subjected and embarked on finding remote planets that are earth-like, etc. It is all a carefully orchestrated plan, folks, done in safe incrementals. They could tell you tomorrow the whole truth of UFOs and related details if they were inclined. But the time isn't right just yet. You are not quite ready.


After that debacle Viking experiment, that probably did find evidence of life on Mars, it was obvious that the equipment needed for future experiments needed to replace it, so that there would be no doubt as to the result of the experiments.
What was needed to be sent on the subsequent missions was a state of the art, automated SEM (Scanning Electronic Microscope) and a much more capable and sophisticated Gas chromatography tool. These are what we use on Earth to prove that a given object or material was, or is currently alive. It astounds me that this still has not been done, irregardless of the expense, as the major existing expense is in the science, mechanics and logistics of just getting the package on the planet.


Q

posted on Mar, 21 2015 @ 09:06 PM
link   
Awesome.

Who wants to get in on the ground floor of the amazing opportunity that is Q's Martian Lard Mining Corporation? QMLMC is poised to become the premier provider for the insatiable terrestrial demand for exoplanetary triglycerides.

Better hurry, Fat Cats - there are a limited number of seats on the board still available, and they're going fast!

We are also offering deep discounts of up to 72% on our 'everyman special' - that's right! No longer do you have to be a member of the rich and famous to take advantage of the latest advancements in Crisco Perchlorate Astroscience. QMLMC is 100% committed to accepting all known forms of monetary compensation, no matter the denomination or economic system of origin!*

Don't miss your chance to get in on this revolutionary opportunity! Call now! Operators are standing by!



*All currencies subject to 5.4x nominal exchange rate excise tax, plus shipping, handling, processing, notarization, activation, early termination, regulatory cost recovery, ATM, setup, underwriting, appraisal, luggage and licensure fees. Late fees may apply to any delay in application processing determined not to be due to fault of QMLMC upon authority of QMLMC executive investigation findings. All fees are subject to 24.3695% daily compounded cumulative interest rates. Triganic Pu unfortunately cannot be accepted due to spatial limitations beyond our control (we did accept a single Ningi once, only to discover to our great dismay that it would not fit through the vault doors to our corporate money bin). Flanian Pobble Beads are indeed accepted, although we can only guarantee the exchange of other Flanian Pobble Beads as opposed to any presumed non-terrestrial tallow.



posted on Mar, 21 2015 @ 11:26 PM
link   

originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: gortex

It is such a long and winding excursion for them to take us on to acknowledge the fact that the Viking experiments in the mid-1970s already found evidence of life on Mars.

False. Non-biological explanations can account for Viking. That means Viking did not find life. Life is AN explanation for the findings, but as long as other explanations are valid life can never be assumed to be the cause.



posted on Mar, 21 2015 @ 11:27 PM
link   

originally posted by: charlyvIt astounds me that this still has not been done, irregardless of the expense, as the major existing expense is in the science, mechanics and logistics of just getting the package on the planet.


Please drop that word from your vocabulary. It's not a real word. Stick with the actual word, regardless.



posted on Mar, 22 2015 @ 01:06 AM
link   

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: gortex

It is such a long and winding excursion for them to take us on to acknowledge the fact that the Viking experiments in the mid-1970s already found evidence of life on Mars.

False. Non-biological explanations can account for Viking. That means Viking did not find life. Life is AN explanation for the findings, but as long as other explanations are valid life can never be assumed to be the cause.


I'd add that while life is one explanation for Viking's findings it is not even the best one given other things we learned about Mars since that experiment such as the amount of perchlorates in the soil and other factors which might fool such an experiment.

The Viking experiment was many ATSers think provided evidence of life on Mars werenever repeated for a very good reason: It was too simple and easily fooled by things which had nothing to with life.

And beyond that, the more we learned about Mars throughout the 80s, 90s and 00s. the less likely a single, simple experiment like the ones done with the Viking landers would be conclusive enough to make any sort of bold statement on whether life exist on Mars.

Instead it made more sense to see if the conditions for life ever existed on Mars and if so for how long, where and what places on Mars could perhaps have preserved life and how can we design better, more comprehensive experiments to look not only for present life but extant life as well.



posted on Mar, 22 2015 @ 01:12 AM
link   
a reply to: JadeStar

I agree. It's going to be a while before we get enough evidence to say one way or another, and will take many different experiments.



new topics

top topics



 
9

log in

join