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Will too many coats of paint be detrimental to the resale value of my house?

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posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 06:53 AM
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I plan on selling my home soon, hopefully within the next year. I have lived here for 31 years. I'm concerned that I have harmed the resale value by painting the interior too much. I paint every room a different color 5 times a month (I have OCD. Don't you dare judge me) and every time a coat of paint is applied the room technically does get smaller.

Being the fastidious person that I am, but unable to do basic math ever since a chemistry accident in high school involving ether fumes, I wanted to figure out exactly how much space I've lost, so I took out my trusty Casio® calculator and got down to crunching numbers.

I paint each room 60 times a year. That's 1,860 times in 31 years. Although that doesn't include last December when I forgot to take my Clomipramine and had an OCD attack, which subsequently resulted in a frenetic and sleepless painting frenzy over the next four days. So that should bring the total to 1,972 from what I remember. I apply two coats every time, and I don't use primer. Primer is just another scam, like car insurance, or sunscreen (Melanoma is just a myth perpetuated by Coppertone and other leading brands).

Anyways, I digress. 1,972 at two coats each time brings us to a total of 3,944 coats. The average coat of paint is 0.005 inches thick (thanks Wikipedia). 3,944 x 0.005 = 19.72 inches. I paint all four walls, and the ceiling, which means that a total of five surfaces are growing larger. 19.72 x 5 = 98.6. Each room has lost 98.6 inches of space in total. Will I have to reduce the price? I'm thinking that if I knocked $20 off for every inch lost I would only lose $1,972.




posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 07:02 AM
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a reply to: Xaphan

I think it more hurts the resale value from the fact that there thousands of coats of paint as opposed how much they reduced the square footage.

I had seven to ten coats of paint on all the woodwork in our Victorian and that was still a massive undertaking to remove them. I would not even contemplate buying a house like yours.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 07:02 AM
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I don't think wall thickness is taken into consideration when measuring square footage of a home for sale, to be honest.

edit:
how the heck do you afford that much paint? I painted a small room last year and I seem to recall it wasn't cheap.
Primer isn't a scam, though- it's quite useful when your previous coat of paint was 30 years ago. It helps even out the surface texture and color for the top coat.

edit on 18-3-2015 by lordcomac because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 07:04 AM
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originally posted by: lordcomac

I don't think wall thickness is taken into consideration when measuring square footage of a home for sale, to be honest.


Correct. It is the external measurements that are used during an assessment.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 07:05 AM
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First things first...

Could you post a pic of the 18+ inch recesses you now have around your windows?



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 07:06 AM
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Man, That's a lot of time and money. I painted a picture of you...a reply to: Xaphan

hope you like it.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 07:39 AM
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a reply to: Xaphan

I think you need a vacation to clear your head.

How about coming down here to Florida for a bit? You can stay here and we can have a paint party


I am being serious. Hey, I will even get out of your way and you can paint all you want. Think about it because it has been around 87 degrees every day and I have a pool.
edit on 18-3-2015 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 07:45 AM
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originally posted by: Xaphan

Anyways, I digress. 1,972 at two coats each time brings us to a total of 3,944 coats. The average coat of paint is 0.005 inches thick (thanks Wikipedia). 3,944 x 0.005 = 19.72 inches. I paint all four walls, and the ceiling, which means that a total of five surfaces are growing larger. 19.72 x 5 = 98.6. Each room has lost 98.6 inches of space in total. Will I have to reduce the price? I'm thinking that if I knocked $20 off for every inch lost I would only lose $1,972.


Actually, your calculations are incorrect.

On an average sized room (10x10) you lost over 16 square feet per wall if the paint is actually protruding from the wall over 19".



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 08:06 AM
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Don't lower your asking price but be a little more flexible during the negotiation process.

Good Luck! Moving is a stressful time so I hope you have some good support to get through it.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 08:11 AM
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*thousand yards stare out of the window*

Do I dare make a joke? No.
Do I dare to inquire what those 2000 linings might look like if cut? Why not, could be a piece of art.

And yes, I do try to stop imagining how a room like that might look like, if you would take a grinding machine to work at a wall.

I really hope that you didn't use just boring plain white paint for every layer...



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 09:00 AM
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originally posted by: ManFromEurope
*thousand yards stare out of the window*

Do I dare make a joke? No.
Do I dare to inquire what those 2000 linings might look like if cut? Why not, could be a piece of art.

And yes, I do try to stop imagining how a room like that might look like, if you would take a grinding machine to work at a wall.

I really hope that you didn't use just boring plain white paint for every layer...


I too hope that the OP decides instead to carve into these layers and create a psychedelic masterpiece.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 11:23 AM
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a reply to: XaphanAs a real estate agent would look at your house overall. The big question would be WHY? The next question would be how much are you willing to spend to correct all the mistakes, so you can sell the house. Personally I would not buy a house in that condition. Your OCD cost you a lot of money. Your outlet should not have been your home. Painting is relaxing to the artist. Maybe you should have started with a smaller canvas. Possibly selling them over the last years.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 11:38 AM
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originally posted by: Ceeker63

Maybe you should have started with a smaller canvas. Possibly selling them over the last years.


I suppose they could always detach the 19 inches of paint from each wall and ceiling, slice them into manageable cross sections, mount them, attempt to sell them as art and use any proceeds to remediate the house while looking for a new property.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 11:55 AM
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Is this for real?

Can't tell.


One thing is for sure, if your interior is painted many different colors, it won't show well and will be harder to sell. And if there are aesthetic anomolies due to over-painting, that won't help either.
edit on 3/18/2015 by kosmicjack because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 12:37 PM
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Grind it out and the psychedelic masterpiece will set you free of your ocd.
I also would like to see a pic of the massive ledges that surround the windows, those must be obvious to anyone buying the house



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 01:32 PM
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originally posted by: kosmicjack
One thing is for sure, if your interior is painted many different colors, it won't show well and will be harder to sell. And if there are aesthetic anomolies due to over-painting, that won't help either.


It's a good point. A consultation with a Realtor where they come to your home and give you a price evaluation should uncover any problems they are going to have selling it. The OP might want to hire a reno company to fix up some issues the Realtor tells them about.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 04:23 PM
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He paints the interior of *every* room a different color *five* times a month.
who cares if every room is a different color today? They'll all be yet another color in six days...

If the paint is truly that thick, I'd be worried about the structural integrity of the walls.

Think about it. You estimate nearly 20" of paint- that's 2880 cubic inches of paint *per square foot* of wall. A gallon of paint only has ~230 cubic inches in it- which means you've got 12.5 gallons of paint per square foot of wall. How much does a gallon of paint weigh?
My guess is more than water, even when completely dried. Water is ~8lbs a gallon- that'd be 100lbs per square foot of wall.

a 10x10 floor with no windows or doors, no ceiling, and 8' walls would weigh 32,000lbs in paint alone.

I'm guessing your estimate on paint thickness is wrong...



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 04:26 PM
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a reply to: lordcomac

Don't forget the ceiling too.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 05:13 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: Xaphan

I think it more hurts the resale value from the fact that there thousands of coats of paint as opposed how much they reduced the square footage.

I had seven to ten coats of paint on all the woodwork in our Victorian and that was still a massive undertaking to remove them. I would not even contemplate buying a house like yours.



Agreed, same deal when we bought our home, we knew there was beautiful woodwork under all the paint and we knew it was going to be work. What we didn't know was that is was going to take a year plus to get to the actual woodwork. Then add on 6 months of sanding and finishing and about a million pounds for paint and wood fibers in the air...Never Ever again would we consider a home like that.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 07:35 PM
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I'd be worried about the long term consequences of inhaling that much paint fume/VOC over the years.



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