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Ted Cruz Wants Common Core Repealed

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posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 09:35 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

And you have proof that Common Core is a better way of instructing?

I asked the question earlier, do you have evidence?




posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 09:38 PM
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originally posted by: beezzer
a reply to: Annee

Universal standards?

Either everyone gets it, or only a few do, because not everyone is as smart as everyone else.

So common core teaches to the lowest common denominator.

So "everyone" wins!

Imagine if clothing was designed the same way common core is utilized.

Everyone would wear the one size that fits everyone.


One of the primary goals in any educational system isn't to try and teach so that those at the top get it, but so that those at the bottom do. It has nothing to do with dumbing things down either, the people at the top are going to learn it regardless. Creating better methodology so that more students can learn is how you increase the general knowledge base of the population.



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 09:39 PM
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originally posted by: beezzer
a reply to: Aazadan

And you have proof that Common Core is a better way of instructing?

I asked the question earlier, do you have evidence?


Only anecdotal, however I am very good at math, I'm practically a human calculator. I know what techniques I use, and from experience I know how others solve things (the people I hang around with do a lot of math, as do I). The ones who are most capable use the techniques they're attempting to teach with common core. The ones who are less capable don't.
edit on 16-3-2015 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 09:47 PM
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originally posted by: Annee

But, you're a parent that teaches.

I admit we're only in kindergarten AND my grandson is high functioning mildly Autistic.

He taught himself to read at 3, but couldn't have a 2 way conversation. He's mainstreaming from assisted kindergarten in a second year of regular kindergarten. They think maturity will help his focus.

Academically he's about 3rd grade, but testing is a challenge.

In a sense I'm also homeschooling. I print Common Core work sheets off the web that I think will challenge him. I send them in as homework and the teacher checks them. They work with me.

Many of the moms complain that they have to do school work with their kids.

If I think I need to speak with someone, I make an appointment. It's been a Win Win for me.



I wasn't schooled in the US so I don't have a complete understanding of the American educational system, but as a parent, we try to encompass everything, and we do it, albeit, old-school (forgive the pun).

We use flashcards for everything.

We have him work on penmanship, cursive, oral presentations as well as structural formats to writing.

He's nearly twelve and already doing advanced math.

Education is an investment.

You only get out, what you put in.

Put in a little, and well, look around.

Put in a lot and the world can be your oyster.

I believed your questions sincere, hence the reply.
edit on 16-3-2015 by beezzer because: f



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 09:55 PM
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a reply to: beezzer

I don't want you to think I skipped out on an answer because I like you Beez. I honestly don't have an answer for you. The caliber of the graduates could only, in my mind, be found through testing. Their ability to conceptualize and think of an answer to a question they haven't previously studied based only on they way they look at a problem.

I really feel like all the anti-common core rhetoric started with Glenn Beck back in his 'government is everywhere and trying to kill you' days. Common Core has very little to do with the federal government and everything to do with states and appropriate educational representatives.



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: links234

Common Core, in my opinion, is a one-size-fits-all approach to education.

My personal opinion is that it will retard excelling students and make them mediocre.



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 10:06 PM
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originally posted by: beezzer
a reply to: links234

Common Core, in my opinion, is a one-size-fits-all approach to education.

My personal opinion is that it will retard excelling students and make them mediocre.


Exactly, since everyone has to get a concept in the classroom before the class moves forward there are two ways to do it - the teacher either sets a pace and leaves kids behind who do not get it (this is how the teacher my middle nephew has it doing and he is getting left behind because of his attention and speech issues) or the teacher waits for every kid to get it before moving forward which bores the kids who got it right away so you lose them. After all, you cannot teach to the brightest because it will leave all the rest behind and fail most of the classroom.

However, with the vicious testing schedule, it sort of precludes the idea of waiting until everyone is ready to go forward ... so kids at the top and bottom are getting shafted. But the kids at the bottom get hurt most of all, and there is no flexibility for trying to reach the ones who could get it if you had the chance to try to tailor things just a bit to fit their needs.

It's apparent that Common Core was designed by so-called Captains of Industry in Corporate America. It is very corporate, top to bottom.



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 10:13 PM
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Regardless of the educational platform used, be it Common core, NO Child...

When class size is increased, educational funding cut, quality teachers quitting a bloated BS bureaucratic mess,
and education generally the red headed stepchild of government; you get what you pay for....


Educational standards will continue to drop and the US will continue to fall far behind ......



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 10:15 PM
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a reply to: beezzer

I have no comment on your intellect; off topic.

You're only asking questions but have nothing you're willing to contribute based on your own experiences.

No one's asked you for any confidential information on your family, just your general knowledge of the issue, but again.


So ... really not much here from you that is on topic. That's a personal sadness, I enjoy your contributions when you decide to make them.

I see you decided to share some info later for another member. Good deal.

edit on 22Mon, 16 Mar 2015 22:20:11 -050015p102015366 by Gryphon66 because: (no reason given)

edit on 22Mon, 16 Mar 2015 22:30:20 -050015p102015366 by Gryphon66 because: (no reason given)

edit on 22Mon, 16 Mar 2015 22:30:38 -050015p102015366 by Gryphon66 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 10:16 PM
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a reply to: beezzer

We seem to actually be in agreement on education
, or at least the importance of.

My little guy is 7. His small motor isn't great -- so I taught him to type. Well, he's still learning, but he can now use the right fingers on the right keys during practice. He loves creative writing.

Common Core homework usually comes home with an explanation of what needs to be learned and why. Also, with instructions to use aids, such as flash cards. They do suggest though that it's good to vary methods.

I could change my mind as we advance in grades. But, I'm happy and understand Common Core for now.
edit on 16-3-2015 by Annee because: Spelling



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 10:18 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

IF it were corporate in nature, would it be preparing the nation's youth to, I dunno, work in Corporate America?

Would that be a bad thing IF that were true? Particularly since Regressives are so intent on reminding us at every opportunity that the Captains of Corporate America are the JOB CREATORS?

Admittedly, those are big IFs ...
edit on 22Mon, 16 Mar 2015 22:29:12 -050015p102015366 by Gryphon66 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 10:28 PM
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originally posted by: beezzer

originally posted by: Gryphon66

Do you have any answers to those questions? Don't keep us in suspense.


Nope, jut posited some questions.



I took your questions as legit.

They are good questions.



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 10:37 PM
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originally posted by: Annee

originally posted by: beezzer

originally posted by: Gryphon66

Do you have any answers to those questions? Don't keep us in suspense.


Nope, jut posited some questions.



I took your questions as legit.

They are good questions.


Thank you.

Ideally, you could have a sack of turnips teaching children, and with the right parents (grandparents) along with the right materials, still provide a good education.

But it has to be tailored to the individual.

You can't expect everyone to learn or achieve at the same pace or make the same achievements.



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 10:42 PM
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originally posted by: Gryphon66
a reply to: ketsuko

IF it were corporate in nature, would it be preparing the nation's youth to, I dunno, work in Corporate America?

Would that be a bad thing IF that were true? Particularly since Regressives are so intent on reminding us at every opportunity that the Captains of Corporate America are the JOB CREATORS?

Admittedly, those are big IFs ...


Current educational standards don't really teach people how to do jobs, the philosophy is more about how to give people the basis to create new ones. Whether that's right or wrong I'm not really sure, but that's how they teach.

To rephase that: It teaches the why something is done a certain way rather than teaching how to do it a certain way.
edit on 16-3-2015 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 10:45 PM
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originally posted by: beezzer

originally posted by: Annee

originally posted by: beezzer

originally posted by: Gryphon66

Do you have any answers to those questions? Don't keep us in suspense.


Nope, jut posited some questions.



I took your questions as legit.

They are good questions.



But it has to be tailored to the individual.



Good in theory, but not realistic.

30+ kids, one teacher, hopefully a paid aide, and volunteer parents.

That's just fact.



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 10:47 PM
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originally posted by: Annee

originally posted by: beezzer

originally posted by: Annee

originally posted by: beezzer

originally posted by: Gryphon66

Do you have any answers to those questions? Don't keep us in suspense.


Nope, jut posited some questions.



I took your questions as legit.

They are good questions.



But it has to be tailored to the individual.



Good in theory, but not realistic.

30+ kids, one teacher, hopefully a paid aide, and volunteer parents.

That's just fact.


And that's why we have issues with education.



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 10:51 PM
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When I was growing up the thing talked about was how teachers graded on a curve.

Seems to me the education system has always had its pitfalls.


Somehow Ted Cruz graduated and made it to a science committee. This nation definitely has its problems.



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 10:55 PM
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originally posted by: beezzer

originally posted by: Annee

originally posted by: beezzer

originally posted by: Annee

originally posted by: beezzer

originally posted by: Gryphon66

Do you have any answers to those questions? Don't keep us in suspense.


Nope, jut posited some questions.



I took your questions as legit.

They are good questions.



But it has to be tailored to the individual.



Good in theory, but not realistic.

30+ kids, one teacher, hopefully a paid aide, and volunteer parents.

That's just fact.


And that's why we have issues with education.


We have issues with every thing.

Parents are the realistic key to educated kids. No matter the method used.

Parents need to stop blaming the schools/teachers, and understand they are being presented an education structure that they, as parents, need to be responsible for executing to it's full potential.



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 10:55 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

I have no dispute at all with your observations.

The educational system in this country has been in a current state of diminishing for at least 40 years.

Standards have been lowered.

Facts are no longer taught.

Critical thinking is no longer encouraged.

"Common Core" is just a lightning rod for "divide et impera."



posted on Mar, 16 2015 @ 11:16 PM
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originally posted by: Grimpachi
When I was growing up the thing talked about was how teachers graded on a curve.

Seems to me the education system has always had its pitfalls.


Somehow Ted Cruz graduated and made it to a science committee. This nation definitely has its problems.


Curves still exist today, sometimes they're merited and sometimes they aren't and a lot of curves these days are political atleast at a college level. Education funding for colleges requires that the colleges graduate students, if the students fail out or drop out the school loses federal funds in addition to the tuition. This creates a situation where a lot of professors are simply unable to fail their students because it will put them out of a job.

That's college though, I've never heard of a high school or earlier grading on a curve but I suppose it's possible. I know my school didn't, but I went to a private school with it's own grading curve of 90% as the cutoff for a D-. They clearly had no problem failing people either.

That said, private school was the best thing my parents ever did for me. It was pre common core, but I still got a damn good education out of it. My public school peers just tried to not get stabbed while walking down the hallway.

As far as Ted Cruz graduating goes, he went to Harvard and Princeton. The Ivy Leagues may sound impressive but their educations are anything but and the proof is in the rates they retain students. They're all over 99%, that means under 1% of people who attend them fail out (most drop out because they got a job offer). The top schools are absolutely notorious for giving people C's to get them through the program (back to the grading curve). Lookng at it, Cruz has a do nothing degree, from a university not known for failing people. That said he seems to be a very good lawyer, it's too bad that most of his interest has to do with science and economics... things he's not quite so well versed in.

In the end that's just another example of there being too many lawyers in DC and not enough others. Imagine if congress were 535 polymaths all interested in politics but each in 2-5 other fields as well.



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