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California has about one year of water left. Will you ration now?

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posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:03 PM
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After reading this article I feel that not only Cali but every other state should start being wiser with their water I feel that lack of responsibility has put the USA in this predicament and some thing needs to be done.

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Given the historic low temperatures and snowfalls that pummeled the eastern U.S. this winter, it might be easy to overlook how devastating California's winter was as well.

As our “wet” season draws to a close, it is clear that the paltry rain and snowfall have done almost nothing to alleviate epic drought conditions. January was the driest in California since record-keeping began in 1895. Groundwater and snowpack levels are at all-time lows. We're not just up a creek without a paddle in California, we're losing the creek too.




Data from NASA satellites show that the total amount of water stored in the Sacramento and San Joaquin river basins — that is, all of the snow, river and reservoir water, water in soils and groundwater combined — was 34 million acre-feet below normal in 2014. That loss is nearly 1.5 times the capacity of Lake Mead, America's largest reservoir.




Right now the state has only about one year of water supply left in its reservoirs, and our strategic backup supply, groundwater, is rapidly disappearing.


I've said it before water is one of the most precious commodities and it's running out...not good..



Finally, the public must take ownership of this issue. This crisis belongs to all of us — not just to a handful of decision-makers. Water is our most important, commonly owned resource, but the public remains detached from discussions and decisions.


It talks of the public taking responsibility does that include the Rich and famous that have Lucious green lawns or pools that constantly need filling??

I'm a bit concerned as stated in previous threads water is a Resource that is becoming scarcer and scarcer..
edit on 14-3-2015 by ATF1886 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:15 PM
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a reply to: ATF1886

OK not to sound less concerned but you have a huge ocean at your despense and theoretically if all the water ran out distillation and disalination could take place on a large scale to curve such a threat. we don't loose the water it circulates in different forms around this planet



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:18 PM
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a reply to: TechniXcality

Desalinization for irrigation? Pricey.
Drinking water? California is working on it.
www.mercurynews.com...



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: Phage

I was specifically referencing drinking water(and truthfully was not thinking about crops).But its almost unfathomable that the whole of the state become a barren land over night. Rain will fall. The weak el nino though I don't believe officially declared has proved well for Texas this year.
edit on 14-3-2015 by TechniXcality because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:25 PM
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Related article on the Cali gov't efforts to curtail excessive water use:


California water-wasters elude fines as drought persists

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California water regulators, alarmed by slack conservation three years into a crippling drought, took the unprecedented step last summer of establishing statewide restrictions and gave communities a hammer to enforce them: a $500 fine for excessive watering of lawns, hosing down driveways and running decorative yard fountains with drinking water.

The drought persists, but most local water departments have been reluctant to crack down on water-wasters. Warning letters are unusual. Small fines are rare. And the $500 hammer is virtually never wielded.

Still, the State Water Resources Control Board is voting Tuesday on adding more restrictions even while acknowledging it's not sure how— or whether— Californians are following existing rules.


Seems to me if you are lax on enforcing existing conversation laws, it makes little sense to pass more strict demands...

Enforce the law on the books, otherwise this appears to be the "boy who cried wolf" syndrome... no?



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:27 PM
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Desalinization is not only expensive but a long process..a reply to: TechniXcality



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: TechniXcality

The agricultural water used in California (that which it doesn't steal from elsewhere) comes in great part from snowmelt, not rainfall. And that's the problem. No snow, and ground water is a limited resource.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:29 PM
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Definitely agree with you but it seems no one is enforcing it seems like they're just crying wolf until it runs out then what... reply to: JacKatMtn



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:34 PM
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Finally caught your humor..😂😂 back to the topic so no snow and ground water not an option so what do you see as a viable or renewable source of water do we start digging into the bergs in the antartic and hope that it lasts I mean the process just is not a cheap viable source.. reply to: Phage



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: ATF1886

California has no viable or renewable source of water and certainly nothing cheap. They are in big trouble. The longer the drought persists...



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:43 PM
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So then theyre F"d with a capital F so then mass exodus out of Cali..??a reply to: Phage



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:44 PM
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They will not give up watering their lawns, even, until it's too late.

It's the american way!

My guess is they'll talk the gooberment into national action, pumping fresh water clear across the country to water their lawns with- and then our tax dollars will cover the expense.
It'll "create jobs!" and stuff.
edit on 14-3-2015 by lordcomac because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:47 PM
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If things got extremely bad, the state, and possibly the federal government, would have to spend the funds necessary to desalinize seawater, unless some other alternative was on the table. Perhaps directing water from far-reaching sources, water that is not being utilized by other regions. Theoretically you could bring water from other states even, again, granted that a nearby state had huge water sources they are not using. It would not be the ideal situation, but if things got bad enough all solutions would be on the table. I think it would come down to two main things: effectiveness and price. I am not sure of the long-term price of desalinization plants, but I would think that a piping system, even a very long one, would be cheaper in the long run. But this is not my area of expertise by any means.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:48 PM
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It's doubtful California will ask for rationing. Americans don't believe in rationing or conserving anything.

It will only be after they run out that they finally realize they have a problem, and start to do something about it.

Maybe when the City of Los Angeles has a few hundred thousand people protesting that they have no water when they turn on their taps, California legislators will sit up and say "oh, who can we ask for help?"

In the meantime, Republicans will still be denying that there is a problem, and will be saying that their faith will pull them through.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:49 PM
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Is it too late to give it back to Mexico?





posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:50 PM
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a reply to: JacKatMtn
You know, I bet they haven't taken into account a vast store of water in northern California.

Marin county hot tubs.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:52 PM
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a reply to: Phage

shhhh... The folks in Northern Cali don't like being lumped in with the irrigated south...



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:56 PM
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edit on 14-3-2015 by ATF1886 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 08:04 PM
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This was posted yesterday (or the day before) and I'm not being that person that rudely points it out for no reason, but after reading that thread I couldn't stop thinking. The comments about spending billions to build high speed rail instead of desalination plants.

Its like the story about Egypt being warned of a coming famine and storing the grain. Real or not, its a great lesson learned (listen to the"crazy guy"). I think the story a month or so ago about NASA predicting a major drought period for the entire century should've been the straw that broke the back. Build the plants, move the cities, survive. But unfortunately, it seems like it may be almost too late. almost....



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 08:08 PM
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Yea ill take that title any day im trying but it seems t he louder i scream the lower the volume of the scream..a reply to: DuckforcoveR



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