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Boy Attacked by Virginia Beach Police Dog During Hotel Search (VID)

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posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 12:00 PM
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Graphic shots in the vid folks. Just a warning.

So who can be held accountable? The dog? The cop?

The dog is considered a police officer with all the rights that go with the status (crazy as it sounds). The handler is responsible IMO as the dog should be considered a weapon and NOT an officer.




www.blacklistednews.com...
Police say that they brought in the K9 unite to search for the Wells Fargo robber(s). They thought they might have been at the America’s Best Inn location, but as the K9 team moved in, a young boy came down the hallway of the hotel. The dog freaked out and attacked the youth, ripping into his back. The boy was taken to the hospital where he received stitches, but he is still very shaken up and scared according to his family.


Now the boy is physically scarred and will most likely come away with a fear of dogs for the rest of his life. The fear of cops might not be a bad thing tho.

Jude11




posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 12:06 PM
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a reply to: jude11

If the dog got away from the cop, then it's the cops fault for not having a good grip on the leash, IMO.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 12:10 PM
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originally posted by: Autorico
a reply to: jude11

If the dog got away from the cop, then it's the cops fault for not having a good grip on the leash, IMO.


Even if he was on the leash, it's the cop's responsibility to control his 4 legged weapon.

If a citizen with a dog had that same situation even while on a leash the dog would most likely be put down.

Peace


+2 more 
posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 12:11 PM
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Poorly trained dog to attack a random kid that way , which in turn means a poor trainer. Common enough among PDs, standards of training are poor to non-existent. You injure a police dog they charge with you assaulting an officer, dog tears up an innocent kid they call it an "accident". They won't take responsibility for it, calling it an accident is proof of that. Horrible double standard at play here with the kid on the losing end of it.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 12:14 PM
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originally posted by: jude11

originally posted by: Autorico
a reply to: jude11

If the dog got away from the cop, then it's the cops fault for not having a good grip on the leash, IMO.


Even if he was on the leash, it's the cop's responsibility to control his 4 legged weapon.

If a citizen with a dog had that same situation even while on a leash the dog would most likely be put down.

Peace


totally agree.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 12:15 PM
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An untrained Police Dog is a loaded weapon.

It is foreseeable that children and other innocents will be there.

Very lucky it was not worse...I blame the person that unhooked the leash.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 12:25 PM
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35 years ago, the military police would use drug dogs to search the barracks. One of my buddies was attacked for having a his lunch (a bologna sandwich) in his pocket. That was the last time they made us remain in our rooms while the dogs were going through.

Dogs are dogs. They're not cops ... they're unpredictable animals. As others have said, these particular animals are trained weapons. You point weapons at people and there's going to be a regrettable accident sooner or later. To ever refer to a dog as an 'officer' was a mistake IMVHO. I had no idea they could affirm an oath of office.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 12:40 PM
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originally posted by: Snarl
35 years ago, the military police would use drug dogs to search the barracks. One of my buddies was attacked for having a his lunch (a bologna sandwich) in his pocket. That was the last time they made us remain in our rooms while the dogs were going through.

Dogs are dogs. They're not cops ... they're unpredictable animals. As others have said, these particular animals are trained weapons. You point weapons at people and there's going to be a regrettable accident sooner or later. To ever refer to a dog as an 'officer' was a mistake IMVHO. I had no idea they could affirm an oath of office.


When they started referring to dogs as officers it was like saying their dogs were in a higher class than us lowly citizens.

Peace



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 01:20 PM
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a reply to: jude11

We can't even keep the human cops under control so this is no surprise.

I guess that's one dog who's going to get paid leave at a doggy resort. Maybe they are catching on to the ole' instant vacation trick.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 01:58 PM
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The police kill our dogs for much less. I'd say putting the dog down and terminating the officer's employment should be sufficient. The city is already paying for the medical bills according to the police chief.



the boy's hospital bills will be paid for by the city "as they should be."


Source



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 02:08 PM
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a reply to: jude11

Well trained police dogs stand down at command. They also attack on command and can take different postures on command. This either wasn't a well trained dog or the handler wanted to see his dog in action. Neither is the dogs fault.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: jude11

i want to know what the procedure is for unleashing a dog. in a motel full of guests is it allowed to unleash the animal to roam until it finds someone to bite? does the officer have to be line of sight before unleashing the animal? was the boy standing between the officer and the suspect? wrong place at the wrong time?

at the very least the K9 policy needs to be reviewed.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: subfab

The dog was never off the leash. It was on a short leash when the boy came running around the corner. The dog, still on the leash, reacted by lunging at the boy and biting him in the back. The officer told the dog at least 8 times to release before it finally did.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 02:29 PM
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originally posted by: jude11

So who can be held accountable? The dog? The cop?


No doubt the evil child leaked his contaminated putrid civilian body fluids onto the fine Hero Officer, thus committing a vicious assault by body fluid on a protected class. I'm sure the perpetrator resisted being bitten, too.

Therefore, the "child" should be immediately arrested and imprisoned for felony assault and resisting arrest.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 02:33 PM
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a reply to: FraggleRock

8 times!!??
i thought the dogs were trained to obey the command at the first issue.
there have been times when i drive to get a coffee and a K9 car parks next to mine. the dogs always bark and act aggressively when i exit and enter my vehicle. i don't trust dogs any farther than i can throw them.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 02:33 PM
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originally posted by: jude11
When they started referring to dogs as officers it was like saying their dogs were in a higher class than us lowly citizens.

Peace


It's the truth! Anything associated with LEOs is automatically elevated to a higher plane of existence. A LEO's used hankie outranks you, you vile pre-perpetrator.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 02:43 PM
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originally posted by: FraggleRock
a reply to: subfab

The dog was never off the leash. It was on a short leash when the boy came running around the corner. The dog, still on the leash, reacted by lunging at the boy and biting him in the back. The officer told the dog at least 8 times to release before it finally did.


The handler should have killed the dog to stop the attack after he failed to release the first time.

The dog should be euthanized, preferably with a machete in front of the handlers, and the handler himself should face felony charges for failure to intervene.

I love how they try to put the onus back on the kid.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 03:44 PM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: FraggleRock
a reply to: subfab

The dog was never off the leash. It was on a short leash when the boy came running around the corner. The dog, still on the leash, reacted by lunging at the boy and biting him in the back. The officer told the dog at least 8 times to release before it finally did.


The handler should have killed the dog to stop the attack after he failed to release the first time.

The dog should be euthanized, preferably with a machete in front of the handlers, and the handler himself should face felony charges for failure to intervene.

I love how they try to put the onus back on the kid.


Or at the very least he could have tazed the dog.

If it was a citizen...well, you can guess what might come next if the first command isn't obeyed.

Jude11



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 03:46 PM
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originally posted by: subfab
a reply to: FraggleRock

8 times!!??
i thought the dogs were trained to obey the command at the first issue.
there have been times when i drive to get a coffee and a K9 car parks next to mine. the dogs always bark and act aggressively when i exit and enter my vehicle. i don't trust dogs any farther than i can throw them.


Depends...

What are you throwing? A St. Bernard or a Chihuahua?

Going for distance or quality?

A lot of factors in throwing a dog.


Peace



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 04:01 PM
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originally posted by: jude11

Or at the very least he could have tazed the dog.


You get weird reactions with animals. It might have become even more out of control than it was. There was at one time a specialized Taser for critters but I don't know if it still exists.

A fast whop to the head with a PR24 or a round through the neck would have done.

If MY dog attacked a LEO's kid, and all I did was stand there and say "no fluffy down fluffy" whilst equipped with a baton and pistol, I guarantee you that more would happen than my insurance company offering to cover the bills out of the goodness of their heart, after all, the cop's kid shouldn't have run by my dog so it's really his fault. It would start with the death of my dog and proceed to my arrest tout suite.

And I wouldn't have the option of barricading myself in the house and issuing press releases that I had investigated the dog and my own actions, and found them to be within guidelines, so go away.



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