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California ... About One Year of Water Left

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posted on Mar, 17 2015 @ 01:54 AM
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a reply to: BeefNoMeat

I currently live three minutes from the 4th biggest and fifteen minutes from the 6th biggest reservoirs in California. There is definitely enough water for another 5 years. I would give it about three years until MAJOR water restrictions are in place. Right now where I live there are very minimal water restrictions in place.

And your part about San Diego is invalid because they recieve 60% of their water from the Colorado River. Not from California.

Again I encourage you to read up on the ARkStorm, and what its impact would mean.

Until then I would advise against listening to the media outlets centered in metropolitan areas.

Thank you.




posted on Mar, 17 2015 @ 03:10 AM
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a reply to: mOjOm

The country would learn to do without California agriculture.....It is needed. The California experiment is failing and will continue to do so.....Not enough water in the desert.



They should start looking west instead of east for water it is the only logical long term solution. Problem is California is filled with pie in the sky minded progressives who's ideals float on the wind like a paper bag.
edit on 17-3-2015 by SubTruth because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-3-2015 by SubTruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 02:39 PM
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If I lived in SoCal right now I would be taking whatever steps I could to increase my self-sufficiency. I would not feel comfortable trusting others for the deliverance of desal plants, the deportation of illegals, or the wise, efficient and fair execution of conservation regulation. My view of the services and agencies tasked with providing our basic needs is so cynical that I don't have any expectation that America will make it through this escalating bottle-neck without looking to various means of Americans taking care of themselves.

Rather than be victimized by poor city planning (densely populated concrete jungles built in the desert that evacuate abundant rainwater into the adjacent sea via large flood channels), I would purchase a rainwater collection tank and install my own gutters for its diversion. If I owned any size property I would encourage the water to soak into the soil via earthworks that slow down the evacuation of rainwater. I would begin to plant drought-resistant food forests (any scale) that I could rely on in the event that the agricultural infrastructure collapses. I would buy local and encourage more tree planting in my area to absorb the abundant sun and maintain a higher degree of moisture above and below ground. I would pour my energy into this kind of work for a thousand prudent reasons applicable to any region under any circumstance before I would wait on the municipalities to care for me in one of the most inhospitable inhabited regions of this country.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 02:52 PM
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I remember a few years back when GA was having the same problems, we got our water supplies so low that it was becoming dangerous, wells were getting dry and the lake that supplies most water to the south and Florida was dangerous low.

I remember that Florida started to complain because GA was holding back the water so Florida streams were getting dry, we almost got legislation to stop GA from holding back water to protect the wildlife in Florida, it became a big deal during that time.

The irony after two years of water conservation and fines for watering the lawn, now we are having flash flows.

Nature is funny, but eventually it will fix itself, it always do.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 03:24 PM
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Still so much water right next to California! LOL

They'll never run out. If anything the forecasts call for some rising sea levels..meaning even better access and MORE water.

The catch? about $100-$400 mill per desalinization plant.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 03:31 PM
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originally posted by: greencmp
a reply to: Sremmos80

Because unions necessarily decrease jobs as do minimum wage laws.

And that is neither a theory nor an accident of process, it is a primary function of such policies.


well yeah...if businesses only had to pay 1.00 dollar an hour, there would be a lot more job creation, but, what's the point if you are living 10 people to a dirt-floored, one-room, shanty.....oh yeah, that is what right-wingers dream and lust after.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 06:22 PM
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a reply to: amazing

I think you hit the nail in the spot here, what better way to push taxes to finance and build a desalination plant with scaring people that they will be waterless and become thirsty in a couple of years, people will be begging for the plant and will open their wallets to the taxes.

Meanwhile those behind the profits will be singing in their way to the bank.

Yes, I remember that the topic of building a plant in California has been in the making for a while, but the money is the problem.

Nation's largest ocean desalination plant goes up near San Diego; Future of the California coast?

www.mercurynews.com...

The problem with the project and why is taking soo long is that is more cons than pros, first it will required incredible amounts of power for the plant to work, then the price is so high that water will become as expensive as gold, this will put a dent on Californians home budgets and still who will pay for the water of those that could not afford the hike in prices.

Then to change sea water into drinkable water will required incredible amounts of sea water to be sucked up into the plant causing a possible ecological disaster in the coast as the water is sucked up with any fish of marine life.

A desalination plant is not cheap and is not as clean as people think.

But it is on the making already and all it needs is enough money to get finished.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 07:22 PM
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originally posted by: marg6043
a reply to: amazing

I think you hit the nail in the spot here, what better way to push taxes to finance and build a desalination plant with scaring people that they will be waterless and become thirsty in a couple of years, people will be begging for the plant and will open their wallets to the taxes.

Meanwhile those behind the profits will be singing in their way to the bank.

Yes, I remember that the topic of building a plant in California has been in the making for a while, but the money is the problem.

Nation's largest ocean desalination plant goes up near San Diego; Future of the California coast?

www.mercurynews.com...

The problem with the project and why is taking soo long is that is more cons than pros, first it will required incredible amounts of power for the plant to work, then the price is so high that water will become as expensive as gold, this will put a dent on Californians home budgets and still who will pay for the water of those that could not afford the hike in prices.

Then to change sea water into drinkable water will required incredible amounts of sea water to be sucked up into the plant causing a possible ecological disaster in the coast as the water is sucked up with any fish of marine life.

A desalination plant is not cheap and is not as clean as people think.

But it is on the making already and all it needs is enough money to get finished.



But remember that money always shows up somehow. Think the 1.7? Billion or so they put up in 2006 I think, for the viaduct or aquaduct work. I don't remember the specifics but it was 1 and a half billion roughly 10 years ago...That's at least 20 desalinization plants they could have built and equiped them all with solar panels/farms to offset the power cost. Just saying. I don't think Cali manages money or resources very well. The water is there.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 07:41 PM
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a reply to: amazing

That's no all, it seems that back in the 80s California build its first desalination plant, by the government at a very high price to the consumers, by 91 was operational, It only lasted 4 months, by then the drought was over and it was cheaper to go back to the old fashion water plant

This time is a big interest involved and the desalination has nothing public in it is all privately invested and with a promise of return, at the expenses of the consumer.

The debacle is how long will it last before the population goes on a rioting mode, because the high prices.




posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 07:58 PM
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a reply to: FarleyWayne

Solution - Raise Taxes AGAIN and Build more Desalination Plants like the one in Carlsbad for a Mere 1 Billion Dollars . Plenty of Sea Water on the Left Coast , Reverse Osmosis is their Only Viable Option Right Now . Or Move to New Jersey where the Largest Aquifers in the World are Located Under the Pine Barrens .


edit on 18-3-2015 by Zanti Misfit because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 08:07 PM
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Easily solved.

Export the illegal aliens, their decendants and the people who moved here who did not have a job waiting for them, then the government cubicle workers. and ratchet back the population to 1974 levels which was the last time that this state built water storage reservoirs.

Anyone who wasn't here to pay taxes back then, don't let the door hit you on the way out. You weren't planned for when they built the infrastructure.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 08:31 PM
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You can almost smell the fear from the deniers on this thread and trying to blame a specific group of humans. There has been plenty of warning given.

None of that matters now. It is here. If we do not adapt and spend the money for adaption, we are going to perish.

The farmers on the Palouse in Wa state have started to adapt. This year they had the fields planted the beginning of March. My husband's family has farmed the Palouse since 1866 and none of the old timers have heard of planting that early. By June it is blazing hot here for past 3 or 4 years when we use to get rain. June rain was a million dollar crop, as they say.

Too bad all our money goes to foreign wars and foreign politicians. We had such promise and could have done so much but I am preparing for a great great depression as these changes force people to move or adapt.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 08:41 PM
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Think of all the H-1B visas that could be granted to build water plants !!!




posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 09:29 PM
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originally posted by: SubTruth
a reply to: mOjOm

The country would learn to do without California agriculture.....It is needed. The California experiment is failing and will continue to do so.....Not enough water in the desert.


Good luck with that. California’s agricultural abundance includes more than 400 commodities. The state produces nearly half of U.S.-grown fruits, nuts and vegetables. I don't think it would be that easy just to pick up the slack, but go ahead and try.


They should start looking west instead of east for water it is the only logical long term solution. Problem is California is filled with pie in the sky minded progressives who's ideals float on the wind like a paper bag.


They are and plants are in the works. I still say they should ditch that damn High Speed Rail BS and use the funds for this instead. But that is where the corrupt politics come in so that's that.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 10:40 PM
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a reply to: markosity1973

Death valley is below sea level. If an air tight pipeline was build that started 50 feet+/- deep, then that pipeline would act like as a siphon and the water pressure would drive the water into the valley. (obviously there would have to be a pumping system to help get it started as well as some clever engineering to get it going). After a few years and possibly multiple pipelines we would have a large salt water lake that would affect the local climate.

It could work.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 11:12 PM
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A well written article from Victor Davis Hansen about the water problem in this State,well worth the read:

victorhanson.com...



posted on Mar, 19 2015 @ 11:01 AM
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a reply to: jrod

You would just have another Salton Sea disaster in 80 years. It seemed a good thing for a few decades then it went to pot.

en.wikipedia.org...
lostamerica.com...



posted on Mar, 19 2015 @ 11:07 AM
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The DWP in los Angeles should not be telling the residents to take 5 gallon showers while their crappy pipes break every other week.

www.bing.com...



posted on Aug, 28 2015 @ 04:01 PM
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its so dry out here this year.. wonder how bad it will be next year? like ethiopia drought and famine? ppl will riot and likely kill each other off in the southern half of this state at least!



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