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Bird flu's back and it's brought friends

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posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 02:17 PM
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H5N1 bird flu has been spreading across Eurasia and into Africa since 2003 - now it's in North America. H7N9 seems to be following the same path, and H5N2, H5N5, H5N6 and H5N8 might just be tagging right along. Research shows that H5N1 and H7N9 spread by transport (trade), not bird migration - and that they both got key genes from H9N2. Viruses may not mate but horizontal gene transfer (recombination) is far more efficient - these little buggers are sharing genetic material like rabbits on steroids.

Needless to say, the world is not ready for a flu pandemic. But one is definitely on the way. Sooner or later.


Threatwatch: Bird flu's back and it's brought friends

H5N1 bird flu burst out of China in 2003 and stormed across Eurasia and into Africa three years later. It's been there ever since and this week its victims are Egyptians. Now another strain of bird flu, H7N9, is spreading in China and the signs are that it might soon rampage across the continent just like H5N1.

Meanwhile, H5N1 is swapping genes with other flu strains and migrating still further with its duck carriers. In December hybrid progeny of H5N1 reached the UK, and for the first time ever, North America. These strains are spreading fast: this week one reached two turkey farms in Missouri. The viruses carry the H5 surface protein that makes them lethal to poultry.

Neither H7N9, H5N1 nor its progeny pass readily from person to person, although they can kill us. But they are evolving rapidly, and the World Health Organization warns that this surge of diversity in global flu could trigger a pandemic for which the world is not prepared.

....H5N1 has also been shuffling genes with other flu strains to spawn H5N2, H5N5, H5N6 and H5N8, which have spread across Eurasia. All kill poultry, and H5N6 has caused serious illness in people. And in December, H5N8 and H5N2 managed what H5N1 never did: they hitched a ride with migrating ducks to the West Coast of North America.

...more....








edit on 13/3/15 by soficrow because: link, clarity




posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 02:39 PM
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Okay.
So now we are supposed to run out and get inoculated for every type of flu.(which is impossible because influenza mutates.)

"Your government wants to inoculate you."

Isn’t it a little too convenient considering the measles outbreak at Disneyland?


edit on 13-3-2015 by highfromphoenix because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 02:50 PM
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a reply to: highfromphoenix

Erm, no. You're right - flu mutates so it's not possible to vaccinate for every type. So this is not about vaccination - it's about how the way we live accelerates flu evolution (and in other viruses, bacteria, fungi too) - and about how we're not prepared, at all, for what's coming at us.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 03:01 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

Okay but what good does it do to run around and say the sky is falling if you don't provide a solution? I understand people have the right to know but creating a panic, even at a low level, is irresponsible.


edit on 13-3-2015 by highfromphoenix because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 03:02 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

Argh, not again.

S&F for the info mate



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 03:08 PM
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Oh rats, now this might jeopardize the chickens from the woman I get my eggs from. Although, if they get the flu, then all their eggs are like flu shots without side effects. I can't take a flu shot but I can eat eggs.

I'm not worrying about this, I can't take the shots if I wanted to unless they were to kill my immune system.

They are trying to talk my brother into that because of his spondylitis, but he isn't even having problems with his spondylitis anymore. He quit taking the calcium supplements and it quit progressing. Now all he has to do is let the buildup reverse, it will take about five years. I went through that, took calcium supplements for about a year and had some bad side effects in my joints and bones.

Have you read this yet Sofi? www.sciencedaily.com...
edit on 13-3-2015 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 03:13 PM
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originally posted by: highfromphoenix
a reply to: soficrow

Okay but what good does it do to run around and say the sky is falling if you don't provide a solution? I understand people have the right to know but creating a panic, even at a low level, is irresponsible.



Ignorance causes panic, why is it the responsibility of everyone else to shut up about science and nature simply because some are too stupid to pick up a book?

It's not "irresponsible" to be scientific and conduct research, write papers, prepare for likely scenarios or try to educate the public about risks and mitigation of them. It's irresponsible for people to stick their heads in the sand because they don't want to learn anything, or they expect the state to think for them.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 03:13 PM
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I was terrified when I read through the opening post. Luckily I remembered that I am not a bird and thus unlikely to get infected. Immeasurable relief I can tell you.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 03:16 PM
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This...


originally posted by: rickymouse
www.sciencedaily.com...


Is actually very interesting.

Ah, the OP even made a thread about it back in 2012:

www.abovetopsecret.com...


Now that scientists are looking for evidence of cross-species gene transfer, they're sure finding a lot of cases. Here's another one - a bacterial gene goes into an insect - and yes, it’s functional.



edit on 13-3-2015 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 03:19 PM
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originally posted by: DPrice
I was terrified when I read through the opening post. Luckily I remembered that I am not a bird and thus unlikely to get infected. Immeasurable relief I can tell you.


Actually some avian flu viruses can affect humans:


Most avian influenza viruses do not infect humans; however some, such as A(H5N1) and A(H7N9), have caused serious infections in people.


www.who.int...



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 03:23 PM
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originally posted by: Rocker2013

originally posted by: highfromphoenix
a reply to: soficrow

Okay but what good does it do to run around and say the sky is falling if you don't provide a solution? I understand people have the right to know but creating a panic, even at a low level, is irresponsible.



Ignorance causes panic, why is it the responsibility of everyone else to shut up about science and nature simply because some are too stupid to pick up a book?

It's not "irresponsible" to be scientific and conduct research, write papers, prepare for likely scenarios or try to educate the public about risks and mitigation of them. It's irresponsible for people to stick their heads in the sand because they don't want to learn anything, or they expect the state to think for them.


You are the only person who accused another of being stupid.

Which says much about your nature.

Have a good day.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 06:24 PM
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a reply to: highfromphoenix

I don't see how you can claim that information sharing can be construed as intentionally inciting fear and panic. I don't see anyone panicking over this and I appreciate the fact that this information is being provided just to enlighten us to what is happening. Providing this information might even save a few lives.
edit on 13-3-2015 by CharlesT because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 08:42 PM
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a reply to: highfromphoenix

If you're looking for a magic pill, that's not a solution. The real solution involves cleaning up the mess we've already made and STOP dumping things into ourselves and our environment that change the biological basis of life on this planet. Give us so-called "advanced" lifeforms a chance to catch up with the microbes. Easy peasy.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 08:52 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
Oh rats, now this might jeopardize the chickens from the woman I get my eggs from. Although, if they get the flu, then all their eggs are like flu shots without side effects. I can't take a flu shot but I can eat eggs.


But cook thoroughly.




Have you read this yet Sofi? www.sciencedaily.com...


Thanks for that! I love it when research supports what I’ve been saying here for years. And this is not the only research to show horizontal gene transfer between species/families/etc. From your link:



Many animals, including humans, acquired essential 'foreign' genes from microorganisms co-habiting their environment in ancient times, according to research published in the open access journal Genome Biology. The study challenges conventional views that animal evolution relies solely on genes passed down through ancestral lines, suggesting that, at least in some lineages, the process is still ongoing.

The transfer of genes between organisms living in the same environment is known as horizontal gene transfer (HGT). It is well known in single-celled organisms and thought to be an important process that explains how quickly bacteria evolve, for example, resistance to antibiotics.

….."This is the first study to show how widely horizontal gene transfer (HGT) occurs in animals, including humans, giving rise to tens or hundreds of active 'foreign' genes. Surprisingly, far from being a rare occurrence, it appears that HGT has contributed to the evolution of many, perhaps all, animals and that the process is ongoing, meaning that we may need to re-evaluate how we think about evolution.”

[comment: We DO need to re-evaluate how we think about evolution.]



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 09:05 PM
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a reply to: swanne

Thanks swan. S&
Did a quick search, found one of my earlier threads about this from 2007. (Not one response. lol)

Crossing Super-Kingdom Barriers


And here's a quick overview I posted in 2013:




Cross-Domain

the Mv1751 gene was able to complement an essential gene in another domain of life. It is rare to find two genes from different domains of life, especially essential genes, that are interchangeable. Because of the conservation of many aspects of the N-linked glycosylation systems in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, the deciphering of the roles and interchangeability of various components may be advanced by consideration of the use of cross-domain complementation."

Cross-Kingdom

Putative cross-kingdom horizontal gene transfer in sponge (Porifera) mitochondria

…We suggest that the horizontal gene transfer of a mitochondrial intron was facilitated by a symbiotic relationship between fungus and sponge. Ecological relationships are known to have implications at the genomic level. Here, an ecological relationship between sponge and fungus is suggested based on the genomic analysis.
Polypurine (A)-rich sequences promote cross-kingdom conservation of internal ribosome entry

…Presumably, such IRES elements can overcome kingdom-specific barriers to translation of the second gene because of their unique capability to exploit only those translation initiation factors and noncanonical transacting proteins that are able to express their function universally in different types of cell. It is possible that the ribosome per se, as the most conserved element of the eukaryotic translation apparatus, is responsible for cross-kingdom IRES activity.

…Analysis of European Molecular Biology Laboratory databases showed that the 5′UTRs of numerous cellular mRNAs contain PARSs that could be regarded as putative plant IRESs. Our preliminary results indicate that two additional mRNAs of this type, i.e., those encoding the tobacco poly(A)-binding protein (43) and 48-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase (44), also promote internal translation. The approach could thus be used to identify IRES elements in eukaryotic genomes.
A bacterial cell–cell communication signal with cross-kingdom structural analogues

Extracellular signals are the key components of microbial cell–cell communication systems. … As prokaryote–eukaryote interactions are ubiquitous, such cross-kingdom conservation in cell–cell communication systems might have significant ecological and economic importance.

Cross-Phylum

Cross-phylum regulatory potential of the ascidian Otx gene in brain development in Drosophila melanogaster.

The origin of molecular mechanisms of cephalic development is an intriguing question in evolutionary and developmental biology. …These results support the notion that basal chordates such as ascidians have the same molecular patterning mechanism for the anterior structures found in higher chordates, and suggest a common genetic program of cephalic development in invertebrate, protochordate and vertebrate.
Conserved genetic programs in insect and mammalian brain development

These studies also show that the genes of the otd/Otx family can functionally replace each other in cross-phylum rescue experiments and indicate that the genetic mechanisms underlying pattern formation in insect and mammalian brain development are evolutionarily conserved.
…a novel family of proteins of presumably nuclear localization, with a characteristic highly basic motif, KRR-R, transcends various phyla, and plays an important role in cellular processes. We propose to call this essential gene KRR1.

Cross-Class

To hard to search quickly due to over-abundance of research reports on genetic modification.

Cross-Order

CRISPR loci reveal networks of gene exchange in archaea

Spacers reveal gene transfer events across species boundaries

….This work demonstrates that there is much gene exchange within and between archaeal genera, and that anti-viral spacers, especially cross-protective ones, are preferentially retained. While the primary role of CRISPR/Cas systems appears to be to provide immunity against invading DNA, many spacers that are acquired can target ran- dom, presumably harmless, genes, just as vertebrate immune systems often recognize harmless antigens.





edit on 13/3/15 by soficrow because: fix quote links and quote



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 11:09 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

I read in an Australian science article on Science daily quite a while ago that if a chicken gets the flu, it passes on immunity to the chicks in the egg and we can benefit from that. The article stated that they could give an infection to the chicken, and the chicken recovered, every egg it layed and every chicken after that seemed to have immunity and passed it off in their eggs. Of course, pharma would not like that, and also you would not need a doctor or nurse to give you the vaccination. It will never be accepted here in America.

The egg doesn't contain the live virus, it contains something that triggers the body to fight the virus. Sort of like antigen builders. There is probably a name for that, but I don't know what it is.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 08:38 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

As a child, I recall hearing from the old farmers that the earth "cleaned" our environment of diseases - first the soil, then the plants, then the animals. Supposedly, each "pass through" made the disease less lethal to those of us at the end of the chain. This idea might be (part of) the basis for the whole "eat local" movement. Makes sense to me.

...Epigenetic research is moving towards proving this idea imho - starting with the recognition that epigenetic mechanisms all down the line respond rapidly to environmental change.



PS. S&







edit on 14/3/15 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 12:02 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

The problem with them shipping things all over the world is that those who cannot adapt as fast will get ill. If their ancestors were conservative with dietary changes and ate locally grown foods, then they are more susceptible and the new foods and microbes can also cause unknown psychological effects that their epigenetics cannot compensate for. Most times it is a doping effect. sometime it can lead to psychosis if ones body cannot compensate for the difference in the secretions of the microbes.

The elite have been acquiring food from all over for many generations, which means that they are less susceptable to these effects. The common people will take the brunt of the problems. When someone from a poorer family gets money somehow, they change their foods they eat many times. This leads to problems from changing the diet and accompanying microbia too fast. See, changing diet can change the microbia dependent on certain foods and in turn alters body chemistry. With the article from Science Daily I read, I see that this can cause change in each generation, this explains how it takes about three generations to adapt to new foods correctly. If the microbia changes, it changes genetics and things level out.

When you are young, you readily repair and replace cells, so most younger people, especially in their teens to twenties, can eat a lot of different foods and can fix things. The problem is that this takes a hit on the telomeres and this lowers the lifespan later. We have been doing this for many generations. Abusing our bodies by eating new foods, kids do it in defiance or just because it's considered evil by their parents. Their parents did it also. People capitalize on this defience and sell stuff to these kids that is bad for them. With the 50,000 approved chemicals to add to food in this country you see that someone at the top of the FDA is not very good at comprehending this kind of stuff. Not much testing is done by the FDA, usually third party testing using only parameters set by the manufacturer is required with the inclusion of an insurance policy for the first seven years or so.

People have to understand that we evolved with microbes and most times they are not our enemy if they are compatible to us. Everyone's balance is difference, and these microbes to have an effect on us in many ways. Food is all psychotropic, finding the balance that keeps you within the normal of your society while keeping us healthy is necessary. I have tested many foods to see how they effect my mood, paying attention is all that is needed. I am not afraid of microbes, they may be like a wild animal and attack you if you attack them or take control if you fear them.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 08:49 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse




People have to understand that we evolved with microbes and most times they are not our enemy



Well said. AND. We are made of microbes. That's just how life works.

Cool, isn't it?










edit on 14/3/15 by soficrow because: hate that auto-correct



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