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Jasper the cat is overcome with emotion after being apart from her dog buddy for 10 days

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posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 04:36 PM
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originally posted by: graceunderpressure
As much as I would like to see a cat "hugging" a dog because he missed him, what I really see is a cat exhibiting overstimulated behavior, expressed by latching on and probably biting poor Jasper. Cats and dogs don't think in terms of "I haven't seen you since last Tuesday. 'Sure did miss you." They're very much in the here and now.

Sorry, I don't mean to spoil anyone's lovely vision. It's just that when we can stop anthropomorphizing animals, they'll be much happier and so will we.


You must not own pets.




posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 04:37 PM
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originally posted by: Bilk22
a reply to: graceunderpressure

My response was in regard to this statement of yours.


It's just that when we can stop anthropomorphizing animals, they'll be much happier and so will we.
Animals do feel and exhibit the emotions portrayed in the video and suggested by the owner. There are plenty of examples of this and also examples of this between species as well. So I'm not sure why you believe there's a problem with ascribing human emotions to actions we see our pets exhibiting and why that would be a problem or make anyone, including our pets, unhappy. That is all.

It's the automatic assumption that an animal means the same thing as a human means, without reading the animal's body language that I find problematic. Why is it a problem? Because we're often the animals' caretakers and it's up to us to avoid mistreating them. Yes, they often can and do experience the same emotions as humans, and there's nothing wrong with observing that similarity when it occurs.

BUT, this video is a prime example of a failure to read animals' body language -- more for the dog than the cat. The dog begins with a yawn. Unlike a human yawn which indicates sleepiness or boredom, a dog's yawn often signals that he's uncomfortable. As the "hug session" progresses, the dog backs up and wags his tail in nervousness. He's obviously ill at ease. Meanwhile, all the owner can think of is "Isn't it cute the cat is hugging the dog and I can't wait to post this on FB."

Carry the scenario further and imagine that it continues to happen, which is not far-fetched if the owner rewards the "cute" cat behavior with attention. Someday, this very chillaxed dog might just have enough and take a bite out of "hugging cat." Unhappy animals. Clueless owners.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 04:38 PM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic

I have to disagree, my cat used to hug me all the time, he'd nuzzle under my chin with his arms over my shoulders, usually with his claws being used for extra leverage to pull himself closer.

Also, when I lived at home with my parents he used to go sit by the door not long before I'd get home from work each day and wait for me.



edit on 13/3/15 by Chadwickus because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 04:41 PM
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originally posted by: Metallicus
You must not own pets.


Quite the contrary. I have lived with pets (dogs, cats, horses, rabbits, fish and others) all my life, and currently both a dog and a cat share our home. I love them dearly. That's why I take the time to learn the language they speak instead of assuming they have the exact same feelings, thoughts and experiences that I do, all the time.

If you don't understand the notion of being sensitive to nonverbal messages from another sentient being, you must not have a wife.
(Kidding!)



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 10:44 PM
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a reply to: graceunderpressure

Cats (and other animals) certainly are capable of hugging for affection. I think you clearly don't know what you're talking about on that end. However, I would agree with your assessment. I thought the same thing when I watched the video. It probably has more to do with having animal friends than not, I'd wager; so I think the people saying you must not have pets are jumping the gun a good bit.

I live alone with two cats. I work from home and am fairly antisocial. I know these cats better than most people I've known. You definitely start to pick up on body language, even different tones to their voice. While the video appears cute, it's not. I don't think it's anything particularly troubling either, though. In my experience, cats act strange after time away from each other. Usually, there's a brief show of dominance or nervous excitement upon returning. I usually have to yell at my older cat a time or two after the vet. Then, they're buds again. It has to do with scent, no? Smelling a little different upon return? Meh. Just my two cents.
edit on 13-3-2015 by thektotheg because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 10:51 PM
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originally posted by: graceunderpressure

originally posted by: Bilk22
a reply to: graceunderpressure

My response was in regard to this statement of yours.


It's just that when we can stop anthropomorphizing animals, they'll be much happier and so will we.
Animals do feel and exhibit the emotions portrayed in the video and suggested by the owner. There are plenty of examples of this and also examples of this between species as well. So I'm not sure why you believe there's a problem with ascribing human emotions to actions we see our pets exhibiting and why that would be a problem or make anyone, including our pets, unhappy. That is all.

It's the automatic assumption that an animal means the same thing as a human means, without reading the animal's body language that I find problematic. Why is it a problem? Because we're often the animals' caretakers and it's up to us to avoid mistreating them. Yes, they often can and do experience the same emotions as humans, and there's nothing wrong with observing that similarity when it occurs.

BUT, this video is a prime example of a failure to read animals' body language -- more for the dog than the cat. The dog begins with a yawn. Unlike a human yawn which indicates sleepiness or boredom, a dog's yawn often signals that he's uncomfortable. As the "hug session" progresses, the dog backs up and wags his tail in nervousness. He's obviously ill at ease. Meanwhile, all the owner can think of is "Isn't it cute the cat is hugging the dog and I can't wait to post this on FB."

Carry the scenario further and imagine that it continues to happen, which is not far-fetched if the owner rewards the "cute" cat behavior with attention. Someday, this very chillaxed dog might just have enough and take a bite out of "hugging cat." Unhappy animals. Clueless owners.
Well I don't disagree with you on those points. I also don't disagree that the dog may be uncomfortable. I really didn't make an assessment of that one way or another before, but looking at it again, I can see your point in that. I was merely responding to what I posted earlier.

More likely than not, the dog and the cat will settle into what ever arrangement they held before he was absent. And as you or someone else pointed out, the cat was "owning" the new presence of the dog. My cats do that as well when people bring stuff into the house. As the saying goes, we live with cats and not the other way around. ~ or something to that effect



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 12:46 AM
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a reply to: graceunderpressure




(notice the licking after the first bite to spread his scent)


Um yeah,since when do cats lick to spread scent? They lick to remove scent and they do it quite well if given enough time. But to spread scent they wipe using their bodies and particularly their heads.There are scent glands in front of their ears.



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