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Bigelow Aerospace has created the next human habitat for space - MUST SEE

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posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 12:37 AM
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Bob Bigelow has been pouring his own money into inflatable habitats for space exploration and colonization through his company Bigelow Aerospace for years, today he achieved what no one I've ever heard of ever has...

He met a NASA deadline!


I'm quoting my friend George Knapp who is one of the only journalists Bigelow has ever let in for an interview:

The road to space...to the moon..to Mars...now leads through Las Vegas...strange as that might seem.


Somehow it seems appropriate to me that Las Vegas would end up being the gateway to the technology that allows our future generations to escape the bounds of Earth...

In any case, here's the video that proves it:
www.8newsnow.com...

Say what you will about Bigelow and his various interests into our wide ranging topics, but, I know nobody else has poured the funds into these strange things in the hope of finding the truth, whatever that truth may be, like Bob Bigelow has and for that he has my utmost "put your money where your mouth is" respect.



edit on 3-13-2015 by Springer because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 12:47 AM
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a reply to: Springer

This is very cool. I remember reading about this a while back and was hoping he would come through. It should be an interesting new wrinkle in space exploration in the coming years.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 01:06 AM
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I respect Mr. Bigelow very much. Even though he funds most of his projects with his own money I just wish he would be a little more forthcoming with the data collected.

I would really like to see his habitats on the moon and Mars in the near future.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 06:14 AM
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a reply to: Springer

This always struck me as the simplest and most doable earth mars human transit solution.

Until we figure out a way to develop an effective magnetic shielding system, water is the best shield and bags like this surrounding the vessel would be the way to do it.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 06:26 AM
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Nice I really hope we get footage of it inflating when they attach it to the station. I do wonder how strong it is compared to normal solid built parts. Wish they gave more tech specs when they reported on it. I also hope we get footage of what it looks like inside it once it's fully inflated.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 06:54 AM
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Surely it's a feat but I still think remote controlled robots are the way to go. Robots should be paving the way for human colonization and be used for space experiments. No need for expensive habitats, no risk of losing precious astronauts, robots can mine resources and once it's a profitable endeavour they can create habitats.
edit on 13-3-2015 by johnnyjoe1979 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 07:26 AM
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Thanks for posting this ... It was good to see George looking peachy Keen in the news segment.

I have only seen one interview with the secretive Bob Bigelow and from what I heard and saw he is the real deal.

Thanks again.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 08:46 AM
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Fantastic idea realized. Its appearance even looks like a leap forward
compared to the metal panel ships we are accustomed to.
As a bonus I love that NASA has to smile while a giant alien logo
looms above them when working at Bigelow.
As a matter of fact, a two story Grey Alien logo will look great on the ISS.

edit on 13-3-2015 by UnderKingsPeak because: clean up



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 10:15 AM
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a reply to: johnnyjoe1979

I respectively disagree. A robot can not think or wonder. Man is an explorer and as such has a knack for seeing things that some observer sitting in an easy chair might miss because he just took a bite of some chips. Nothing beats a hands-on approach when it comes to investigating the unknown.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 10:43 AM
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Awesome news. Under budget and on time. Why isn't he running NASA?


In compact pre expanded state. It is about 13 feet long and 11 feet wide and will catch a ride on the Space X rocket.




Called the BEAM, for Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, will be launched, then attached to ISS in September. The craft is inflated with oxygen and nitrogen once it is in orbit.....the collapsed spacecraft will be attached to the International Space Station, where it will be inflated to its full 16 cubic meters and then studied by ISS astronauts for a two-year trial period to see how it holds up.


The pics don't do it justice so watch the video if possible.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 10:49 AM
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a reply to: Springer

Looking forward to seeing it attached to ISS in a few months. I'm working on getting back up on the horse of ISS tracking with a few modifications to my rig to make it Windows 7 compatible. Here's the first "before" picture of ISS without the BEAM module:

I'll be doubling the magnification on my next attempt in April so that I can get enough resolution to clearly view the difference when BEAM is attached. BEAM will present its side profile as seen from the ground based on where they're attaching it to the Tranquility module.

Mostly this mission is a durability test. The hatch will be closed off to BEAM except for a few times per year to record the readings inside. They're going to test the leak rate and radiation levels. Still, it's one step closer to an operational inflatable space station. It's definitely a symbiotic relationship for Bigelow and NASA.
edit on 13-3-2015 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)

edit on 13-3-2015 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 11:52 AM
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Dunno much about bigelow, but from the looks of it, it is an impressive feat
a reply to: Springer



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 01:08 PM
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If I ever get the chance to own one. I'm writing on the outside someplace The Great Ship Jiffypop.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 04:25 PM
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Cool to see this ready for flight. Love the logo!



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 06:30 PM
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a reply to: Springer

I really hope these inflatable habitats work,they could be the next big step to cheaper space capabilities.
What worries me are micro meteorites-what will the inflatable skin be made of?

Multilayer graphene/carbon/kevlar composite or something like that?

Will that be enough to take the punishment of micro meteors?

I hope so-I want to see this working.




posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 06:32 PM
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originally posted by: greencmp
a reply to: Springer

This always struck me as the simplest and most doable earth mars human transit solution.

Until we figure out a way to develop an effective magnetic shielding system, water is the best shield and bags like this surrounding the vessel would be the way to do it.


Magnetic shielding has been done - even a low strength magnetic field is enough to deflect high-energy cosmic rays. They may be coming in fast, but even a small magnetic field is enough to deflect them out of the way.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 06:53 PM
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Would they still need to find a way to make oxygen on the moon to keep this filled? (If it were a moon base)?

Inside is only going to be a "hall" no floors, equipment etc. not sure what it's future use would be unless you can fit out the insides, and then you still need to carry structural materials for floors and stairs and shelves?

Maybe it could be used, if possible to get it see through as a large greenhouse, allows the plants to grow and be used as some type of oxygen maker / co2 cleaner.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 06:59 PM
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originally posted by: stormcell

originally posted by: greencmp
a reply to: Springer

This always struck me as the simplest and most doable earth mars human transit solution.

Until we figure out a way to develop an effective magnetic shielding system, water is the best shield and bags like this surrounding the vessel would be the way to do it.


Magnetic shielding has been done - even a low strength magnetic field is enough to deflect high-energy cosmic rays. They may be coming in fast, but even a small magnetic field is enough to deflect them out of the way.


But it isn't just radiation and high energy particles that we have to protect against, we need something that can deflect micrometeoroids or absorb them and heal after their impact.



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 07:08 PM
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the ISS Bounce House is gonna fly! You know them astronauts wanted a bounce house for birthday parties. XD



posted on Mar, 13 2015 @ 09:25 PM
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a reply to: Springer

Well I have to tell you that I read your OP as soon as you posted it last night and roared with laughter, then promptly fell asleep on my keyboard. That's a first for me.

I finally connected to the video and am amazed and excited. Bigelow fulfills the old Hopi prophecy about putting colonies in space.

I just wonder though if the lexicon can include one more type of space BEAM. We're confused enough to begin with, lol.




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