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Why did we kill them . And for what . The Thylacine .

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posted on Mar, 29 2015 @ 01:14 PM
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originally posted by: hutch622
a reply to: Kangaruex4Ewe

Here is just a few seconds of hope .



That's from the movie "The hunter".

A very good movie by the way.




posted on Mar, 29 2015 @ 10:34 PM
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a reply to: hutch622
The first picture looks like it is a fake. I read about this species on wikipedia and am discouraged yet again by another extiction on the Earth,...



posted on Mar, 29 2015 @ 10:38 PM
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a reply to: agenda51

Actually, if you start breeding Kangaroo's over volcanic rocks you can start reviving their souls.



posted on Mar, 29 2015 @ 10:56 PM
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a reply to: hutch622



We killed these animals off for sheep , and chickens , really , what were we thinking .


Like you I'm saddened by any species going extinct needlessly. "Mother Nature" herself has caused the vast majority of extinctions however and I think you need to judge peoples actions, based on the time and circumstances of when this happened.

Those sheep and chickens were their food supply. It in large part happened due to the need to survive themselves. That is far different than say killing for fancy fur coats and its a bit unfair to condemn them for it. If your own children were in danger of going hungry and a predator was killing their food supply, you may have done the exact same thing.
edit on 3/29/2015 by Blaine91555 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2015 @ 12:08 AM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

Yet the photo of a Thylacine with a chicken most likely had to be staged . It cant be proven but you have to admit it is a pretty good photo considering the time taken , did the Thylacine just sit there and pose .When it boils down to it , we , us , humans have a habit of destroying things , and we are very good at it . Maybe they were on their way out , we will never know .



posted on Mar, 30 2015 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: hutch622

I mean, yeah, the chicken in the mouth is a pretty hoaxy image. Why people even bother about staging those photos is beyond me, says alot about humans as a species though. Did you read about what I said about breeding kangaroos over volcanic rocks? That's an intuition I had to start reviving their souls, but, I admit it's a pretty hopeless image since they no longer have bodies to inhabit the Earth in. It's just sad to me. I hope one day us humans get to suffer the same fate all those extinct animals have to suffer.



posted on Mar, 30 2015 @ 12:24 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
a reply to: hutch622



We killed these animals off for sheep , and chickens , really , what were we thinking .


Like you I'm saddened by any species going extinct needlessly. "Mother Nature" herself has caused the vast majority of extinctions however and I think you need to judge peoples actions, based on the time and circumstances of when this happened.

Those sheep and chickens were their food supply. It in large part happened due to the need to survive themselves. That is far different than say killing for fancy fur coats and its a bit unfair to condemn them for it. If your own children were in danger of going hungry and a predator was killing their food supply, you may have done the exact same thing.


Pretty much this. Mother nature is the master killer and we will never be on par with her, with time we will be next species to be wiped out by here.

Anyway, as far as i'm concerned, the Thylacine was not the responsible for the cattle hunting, but other animals instead he was blamed for that.



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 08:28 AM
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originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: hutch622

Sad very sad they would have been an impressive species......and with that wish full thinking i worked years ago for a fellah whom told me a story of being in the Tasmanian bush with his 2 German shepherds sometime in the 90s,he told me that all of a sudden both dogs just stopped and freaked out and became very submissive and he himself saw what he described as a tassie tiger about a hundred feet away just standing on a rock staring at them.....interesting that the dogs reacted the way they did..like they were in the presence of predator higher up on the food chain....

Sadly a second hand story is all i have ...would be way cool if there was any truth to it


JUst like the guys saying they have seen them in WA, there heaps of people here in Central Victoria who swear they have seen them too. I think the species here doesnt have the stripes because there are a lot of reports of big cats in the same area.

The reason I quoted your post is that the same reaction is had by dogs here too. I know trustworthy people who have said their dogs go all scared, freak out, cower wimper, hide etc, when that thing is around. I wonder if it emits a specific odour that freaks the dogs out.



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 12:30 PM
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originally posted by: Spaceweevil2


The film The Hunter (www.imdb.com...) without ruining the story - it's about the search for the last Thylacine.



It's on Netflix too! Woo hoo!



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 09:55 PM
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a reply to: Scrabbydoo98

It seems they have not shown the movie in Australia, is it really that bad?



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 12:27 AM
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originally posted by: Cinrad
a reply to: Scrabbydoo98

It seems they have not shown the movie in Australia, is it really that bad?


I thought it was pretty good to be honest.



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 02:14 AM
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Just goes to show my ignorance, thought these guys were still alive :/ I heard these things were really tough too, like they could stand up to something the size of a smaller bear if they really had to. Similar to the badger.



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 11:13 AM
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originally posted by: Cinrad
a reply to: Scrabbydoo98

It seems they have not shown the movie in Australia, is it really that bad?


Every country's Netflix is different. Personally I think GeoBlocking is NLBS.



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 02:37 AM
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a reply to: OfManAndWolf

Yes it seems they were so dangerous we had to wipe them out . But seriously if they were like a grown up Tasmanian devil you would not want to screw with them .



posted on Jan, 4 2016 @ 12:33 AM
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a reply to: hutch622
www.themercury.com.au...
Well it seems the Tasmanian tiger myth just wont go away It seems one has been sighted in the Gippsland area of SE Victoria so i guess that would make it a Victorian tiger .



But sightings of the animal have been prevalent ever since, particularly along the Gippsland coast where it is believed a breeding pair of Tasmanian tigers were released at Wilsons Promontory just after WWI.


Kind of strange since the last one supposedly died in 1936 . Lets just hope this was not misidentification .



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 04:44 AM
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I cant remember if it was on this thread or another one, there was footage of a thylacine (or not) running through a caravan park or car park at a national park or something, it only lasted about 5 seconds and it was taken in the 70s I think. Does anyone know which one I am talking about?



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 05:03 AM
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I read your thread with interest. I tend to think that given the Tassy wilderness the tiger may not have been hunted to extinction. Very difficult country out there and methinks that farmers or settlers would not have bothered venturing into this country to totally wipe out the tigers.

Where I live we have many dingoes, cross breed dogs etc, But I would not go over hill and dale to seek and sort them out. Tassy has more difficult terrain and a few have died in that geography just bushwalking let alone hunting.

My heart says the tiger still exists.

Kind regards,

Bally



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 06:09 AM
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originally posted by: Irishhaf
I believe they are still out there... I have no proof I can only offer what I saw in Florida, with the Florida panther.

Till around the 90's when the do-gooder left screwed things up, the panther survived in a heavily populated state.

I would say the odds are decent a small population is still there if inbreeding hasn't finished them off.


I personally have seen one, (Florida panther that is.) I know they survived. Me and a former wife were going to visit her mother when one ran across the highway. I was stunned, but we were elated nonetheless. It is not everyday someone gets to see one down here.



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 06:12 AM
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Not being Australian I wouldn't tell them how to spend their money, but it would be nice if there was a large scale operation to try to track down a few, and at least attempt to repopulate in some way.



posted on Mar, 24 2017 @ 08:05 PM
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Sad to think the last tassie tiger died from neglect and freezing to death. Humans suck sonetimes




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