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Col. Corso, still perplexed...

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posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 06:54 PM
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a reply to: Tangerine

Born in 63' and witnessing the moon landings and watching Star Trek and the TV series UFO and the like, I was quite caught up in it. It took several years of living for my intelligence to get to a level that allowed me out of a fantasy world of 'They are coming to save/conquer Earth'... So the answer I guess was, just fantasising as young Men will do.




posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 07:09 PM
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originally posted by: vance
a reply to: Tangerine

Born in 63' and witnessing the moon landings and watching Star Trek and the TV series UFO and the like, I was quite caught up in it. It took several years of living for my intelligence to get to a level that allowed me out of a fantasy world of 'They are coming to save/conquer Earth'... So the answer I guess was, just fantasising as young Men will do.


Same here, birth year and all.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 07:29 PM
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originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed


Corso never needed and never embellished his career. When you are cabinet level material like he was, why would he need to embellish?


"Cabinet level material"???? Corso? He was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Army, an O-5. I hate to tell you this, but that is not "cabinet level" by any stretch of the imagination. It's a mid-level officer at best. The only thing remarkable about this is that he failed to make full colonel, even though he went through WW II when opportunities for advancement were plentiful. A normal in-band career would have made him a full colonel with assignments commensurate with the rank before he retired. In my opinion, he was probably discriminated against because of his rather strange looks and small stature, which is hardly his fault, but it is also a perfect scenario for embellishing.

Now, the "cabinet level" issue is usually claimed because HE claimed, himself, to have been "on the National Security Council." when, in fact, he was on THE STAFF of the National Security Council, i.e.: A Gofer with ZERO policy-level input. Apologists for Corso will frequently point out that "that's what he meant" and he was 80, so he misspoke and it's no big deal.

And this leads to the claim that Bill Birnes, the ghost-writer for Corso's book, is the one who embellished things and that he simply made up things that Corso knew weren't true and put them in the book without Corso's knowledge or permission. This has the effect of making Birnes out to be the bad guy by displacing the book's exaggerations from Corso onto Birnes.

But when you actually look at the claims, they make little sense. The basic idea was that he salted alien technology into industry so industry could claim the inventions. What ones exactly? Two of the most famous were the integrated chip and night vision goggles. The problem with these is that they both have a well-documented history of their invention that DOES NOT REQUIRE alien input. The basic design of the integrated circuit, for example, is the fifth generation of the same design that goes back to the 1890's. That's when the basic design was implemented. It then went through an electronic phase, a vacuum tube phase, a transistor phase, and finally the whole idea was ported to integrated circuits. In other words, the invention of the integrated circuit was an incremental evolution that has been well documented and started well before Corso came on the scene. The idea and design did not just suddenly appear. It may seem like that to someone who was not paying attention the the growth of technology, but it simply was not a giant leap forward. It fits right in with Moore's Law, including the timeline.

So the basic idea that you NEED a Corso-like individual for this stuff is fundamentally flawed to begin with.

But it doesn't stop there. Here Lt. Col. Corso is wandering around industry salting stuff to GE and the like and he JUST HAPPENS to come across ALIEN BODIES that he was shown clandestinely. Here you have what is supposedly the most closely-guarded secret of all time and Corso just shows up at the right place at the right time and is asked, "Hey, you wanna see something really cool?" and the Lt. Col. gets access just like that. If you will remember General Goldwater (the Senator) was hotly denied access when he asked General Curtis LeMay if he could see the bodies (so the story goes) and was given a direct order to never bring up the subject again. But Lt. Col. Corso? Why, he just waltzes right in.

But it doesn't even stop there. Corso tells the story of driving alone in the desert and making contact with an alien being who begged him to turn off the base radar which was interfering with the operation of his spaceship. All this takes place telepathically. So Corso calls up his base, orders that the radar be turned off, and the alien is able to fly away. Once again, Lt. Col. Corso "just happens" to be there and see all this, and fix it in the nick of time.

So when you add all this stuff up the total of the work just doesn't make sense. Salting the technology is ridiculous and unnecessary, then we get to personal encounters that strain credulity.

If you guys want to believe this tripe by all means feel free, but what we really have here is a little, not so very successful guy with a lot of big stories that don't hold up. The onus of "proof" here is on YOU, not on people who can so easily point out the ridiculous aspects of these stories.

edit on 3/8/2015 by schuyler because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 08:03 PM
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a reply to: gortex





I linked a piece from Brad Sparks who is a reputable UFO researcher who has exposed the holes in the story told by Corso


There's a lot of "reputable" UFO researchers out there! For every UFO case, there is always someone out there ready to refute eyewitness testimony no matter how credible the witness or incident. People are hired by government agencies to repute UFO sightings, that's what project Blue Book was all about.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 08:42 PM
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I wonder if Corso agreed (or was pressured) into these fabrications by his superiors a la 'Mirage Men'? (MM is a recent book that speculates that UFO buffs were controlled by US gummint / Air Force people for disinformation purposes.)
Corso's is either the story of the era, or a collection of huge lies. (Or a disturbingly creative imagination.)



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 10:36 PM
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originally posted by: AthlonSavage
a reply to: vance


Corso always came across to me as genuine. Please highlight clearly the piece of evidence that proves hes a liar?



Everything in the book about spaceflight, my professional specialty, is imaginary. Specific examples here:

www.jamesoberg.com...



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 10:40 PM
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originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed....


James Oberg Quote: \"People see things at the limits of their vision and fill in the details from their imaginations..from their fears. Most idiotic of all responses and nobody could be dumbed down enough to believe that one except maybe Pha.g.e\\\".


Jeez, I have no idea what this means either, it was a sentence grabbed from a long interview with "NASA's Unexplained Files" dropped into an entirely different segment. You can't always believe what they show you on television. Aim and fire at stuff I've written that I have editorial control over, please.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 11:18 PM
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what a gullible breed

0.0041666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 11:28 PM
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originally posted by: vance
a reply to: Tangerine

Born in 63' and witnessing the moon landings and watching Star Trek and the TV series UFO and the like, I was quite caught up in it. It took several years of living for my intelligence to get to a level that allowed me out of a fantasy world of 'They are coming to save/conquer Earth'... So the answer I guess was, just fantasising as young Men will do.


Makes sense. I suspect that people who aren't chronic liars have a hard time understanding those who are. In my experience, chronic liars feel a compulsion to lie even when there's no logical reason for them to do so. In other words, they lie because they're liars.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 11:28 PM
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originally posted by: AthlonSavage
what a gullible breed

0.0041666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666


Cat loose on the keyboard again?



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 11:30 PM
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originally posted by: draknoir2

originally posted by: vance
a reply to: Tangerine

Born in 63' and witnessing the moon landings and watching Star Trek and the TV series UFO and the like, I was quite caught up in it. It took several years of living for my intelligence to get to a level that allowed me out of a fantasy world of 'They are coming to save/conquer Earth'... So the answer I guess was, just fantasising as young Men will do.


Same here, birth year and all.


Yeah, I think many of us went through that, just like with religion. Then there are those who never get beyond it. They're 50 years old and still waiting for Santa to come down the chimney with a pony.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 11:36 PM
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originally posted by: WeRpeons
a reply to: gortex





I linked a piece from Brad Sparks who is a reputable UFO researcher who has exposed the holes in the story told by Corso


There's a lot of "reputable" UFO researchers out there! For every UFO case, there is always someone out there ready to refute eyewitness testimony no matter how credible the witness or incident. People are hired by government agencies to repute UFO sightings, that's what project Blue Book was all about.


Seventy years and not one iota of testable evidence that extraterrestrials exist, visit earth and abduct people. Not once in all that time did a "saucer" crash in Nitpick, Arkansas in someone's back field and someone found it and hauled an alien body back home and tossed it in Ma's freezer or took a piece of the crashed saucer home and hid it in the barn. Nope.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 11:39 PM
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originally posted by: works4dhs
I wonder if Corso agreed (or was pressured) into these fabrications by his superiors a la 'Mirage Men'? (MM is a recent book that speculates that UFO buffs were controlled by US gummint / Air Force people for disinformation purposes.)
Corso's is either the story of the era, or a collection of huge lies. (Or a disturbingly creative imagination.)


It probably wouldn't have required pressure or persuasion. He probably fit the ideal personality profile needed by psyops to spread disinformation: gullible, eager to impress, looking to inflate his ego, and well-practiced in spinning yarns. You know how there are people you know are lying but are so good at telling stories that you want to listen anyway?

All it would have taken was for fake secret information to "fall" into his hands and for him to "accidentally" witness staged events. His basic nature would have provided the rest.
edit on 8-3-2015 by Tangerine because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 11:52 PM
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originally posted by: vance
a reply to: Tangerine

Born in 63' and witnessing the moon landings and watching Star Trek and the TV series UFO and the like, I was quite caught up in it. It took several years of living for my intelligence to get to a level that allowed me out of a fantasy world of 'They are coming to save/conquer Earth'... So the answer I guess was, just fantasising as young Men will do.


I was born a few years earlier, and remember reading a George Adamski book, and peering out my window looking for a UFO... ah, when we were children. However some never grow up!



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 11:55 PM
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originally posted by: hellobruce

originally posted by: vance
a reply to: Tangerine

Born in 63' and witnessing the moon landings and watching Star Trek and the TV series UFO and the like, I was quite caught up in it. It took several years of living for my intelligence to get to a level that allowed me out of a fantasy world of 'They are coming to save/conquer Earth'... So the answer I guess was, just fantasising as young Men will do.


I was born a few years earlier, and remember reading a George Adamski book, and peering out my window looking for a UFO... ah, when we were children. However some never grow up!


I read the same book and did the same thing.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 11:56 PM
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originally posted by: Tangerine.... All it would have taken was for fake secret information to "fall" into his hands and for him to "accidentally" witness staged events. His basic nature would have provided the rest.


When I was on active USAF duty at a high security military facility in the Rockies [and a division security officer] there were several events that looked to me to be security tests placing 'tracer' rumors into the population to see how fast and far they spread.

Then there was a buddy who ran a 'Broken Arrow' team. He never had a real weapon accident to handle but deployed on field exercises once a year or so. The rule was, DON'T get the locals worked up over RADIATION [this was not long after the Palomares accident in Spain], even though you had to let local law enforcement take part in perimeter control. He developed a plan that worked every time, since of course the whole corner of the state knew there were military guys sniffing around -- but nobody EVER later reported radiation scares. It was because he told the local sheriff they were guarding his team's retrieval of a crashed flying saucer. Mission accomplished. No, he never told me where the exercises took place, but it was in 1970-2 or so.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 11:58 PM
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originally posted by: Tangerine...

I read the same book and did the same thing.


Me too, and with friends I tried to decode the mystery written message the Venusians had left behind. I was like 12-13 in the mid-1950s.



posted on Mar, 9 2015 @ 03:37 AM
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a reply to: Tangerine

You've obviously never seen one.



posted on Mar, 9 2015 @ 05:15 AM
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originally posted by: ItCameFromOuterSpace
a reply to: Tangerine

You've obviously never seen one.



I've never seen what? A UFO? Yes I have. UFO means unidentified flying object. Unidentified. It does NOT mean extraterrestrial spacecraft.

Let me know when you have testable evidence proving that UFOs are extraterrestrial craft.
edit on 9-3-2015 by Tangerine because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2015 @ 05:17 AM
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originally posted by: JimOberg

originally posted by: Tangerine.... All it would have taken was for fake secret information to "fall" into his hands and for him to "accidentally" witness staged events. His basic nature would have provided the rest.


When I was on active USAF duty at a high security military facility in the Rockies [and a division security officer] there were several events that looked to me to be security tests placing 'tracer' rumors into the population to see how fast and far they spread.

Then there was a buddy who ran a 'Broken Arrow' team. He never had a real weapon accident to handle but deployed on field exercises once a year or so. The rule was, DON'T get the locals worked up over RADIATION [this was not long after the Palomares accident in Spain], even though you had to let local law enforcement take part in perimeter control. He developed a plan that worked every time, since of course the whole corner of the state knew there were military guys sniffing around -- but nobody EVER later reported radiation scares. It was because he told the local sheriff they were guarding his team's retrieval of a crashed flying saucer. Mission accomplished. No, he never told me where the exercises took place, but it was in 1970-2 or so.


Very interesting.



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