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There May Not Be Even One "Biological" Physical Alien In Our Universe !

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posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 02:03 PM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

Your argument is invalid. If there isn't we will plant it - yes we will give life to another place in space, once we see an organism that survives a more hostile nature of another planet. Thus, this planet won't be the only one. It may be already happening if mars rovers have not been placed sterile and brought some organisms with themselves.




posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 03:20 PM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

I think we're too enmeshed in the Anthropic Principle to have many certainties about life elsewhere. We're only (at least) an outcome of circumstances in play on this planet. We can, and should, listen to the varied views of astrobiologists, physicists, anthropologists, molecular biologists, futurists etc and allow ourselves to speculate within shifting boundaries.

I mean, it's not that long ago when it seemed reasonable to imagine practical interstellar travel and now it's potentially an insurmountable problem. Until very recently we knew there was no water on the Moon and now we know there is. It's only when we have tried and failed at something, or gained evidence, that we can offer certainties.

Drake equations, Fermi paradoxes, 'great silences' and even the 'great filter' are just plausible perspectives until more data comes in.

Do you know that feeling when you're alone in an empty building at night? Have you ever called out 'Hello?' Nothing there? There's that unsettling sensation that comes naturally to humans when we feel alone. At this moment in time, I think that scenario represents our place in the Cosmos. We're listening carefully and there might be nothing out there at all.

It gives me an existential anxiety attack to consider that all the noise we make down here is echoing into the silence of space. It's not so much a momentary anxiety pinned to this period of time either. *If* we're alone, the idea that we've been sentient for such an infinitesimal flash amidst the dazzle of billions of years gives me vertigo. I mean, how uniquely precious might life on Earth be if it's the only rendering of sentience since our universe began?

You and I are here for our 'three score and ten' and thousands of previous generations went to their deaths with no more understanding about the probabilities of LIFE elsewhere. Setting aside Drake's equations, the one statistical probability we all face is that we'll meet death without ever knowing if life exists in other places. Pass the whiskey...sigh...



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 05:20 PM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

Great post, this is the type of response I was hoping for in this thread.



I mean, how uniquely precious might life on Earth be if it's the only rendering of sentience since our universe began?

I have seen interviews from scientists that believe wholly in evolution, but believe the quoted statement as well, and have expressed that humanity has no clue of the moral obligation it really has to keep as many species of creatures alive including ourselves. A moral obligation to the universe, that if all biological life ended on earth, it ends in the entire universe.

That is a sobering thought for our blue planet and the people on it, for those capable and wanting to mediate on it.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 05:24 PM
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Aliens are everywhere and this planet is in quarantine. We have massive egos and little intellect. The human race is little more than a joke.
To think this universe only gave conscious awareness to the savages on this plant is beyond laughable.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 05:34 PM
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a reply to: starwarsisreal




or what if we were the last surviving intelligent species on the universe?



Or even more likely, what if we are the first?

a reply to: Christosterone




The arrogant nature of people proclaiming our existence as being singular in the universe is unfathomable.


Why go on the attack so immediately. This is all speculation purely
and It has nothing to do with arrogance. A closed mind is arrogant.

Chill
edit on Rpm30815v482015u59 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 05:38 PM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

If we are the only ones out there...then help us we're all doomed...and a pretty poor excuse for humanity...no matter how many eyes, arms, legs, and skull sizes we have....




posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 05:42 PM
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The universe as we observe it is unimaginably huge.

There could only be one single intelligent civilisation in each galaxy, and the universe would still be teeming with life.

Think about that.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 06:03 PM
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The whole universe?

Not buying it. It's way too big.

I have often wondered though about a few things.

Take a look at our Planet where we know life formed and eventually produced a intelligent tool using species.

Now go back and take a look at Earth's history. Specifically: Extinction Level Events.

How many times has this happened with our world? Until eventually we came around.

Just how "Lucky" are we?

Think about a cylinder of space, with the solar system at the middle. Give the cylinder a diameter of about 5000 light years, and make the height of it about 1000 light years.

Now think about all the starts located in there.

But now start thinking about this list:

1) Hyper nova
2) Rogue Star
3) Rogue planet
4) Unstable orbit
5) Planetary collision.
6) Comentary collision.
7) ELE level asteroid collision
8) Super Volcanoes
9) War (using WMDs)
10) Aggressive pandemic
11) Runaway technology (the Nanobots got loose and ate everyone)
12) Severe Carrington Event (massive Flares that produce CMEs that destroy their electrical grids all the time).
13) Their own version of AGW

Several of those can wipe out any kind of life. Some would just keep life very limited, and others would keep life very low tech.

For some of those, think about the Earth, and especially if some of them were to of happened in the past 10,000 years.

I firmly believe their is other intelligent life out there. I also firmly believe that the chances of it happening here in our galaxy alone is quite high.

What I worry about is: that list up there. Lot of chances for those things to happen too.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 06:17 PM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

Would that mean that the universe is up for grabs?

I want the closest star to Earth with inhabitable planets so that I can monopolize on a way station.

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
edit on 8-3-2015 by FalcoFan because: greed



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 06:20 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

We have to spray humans across the stars.

Only way to survive.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 06:23 PM
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This topic has been posted so many times. So God created life on Earth and some extremophiles on a few planets and moons in our Solar System? That seems kind of funny don't you think? I bet God could create life throughout the Universe, quite easily, and so does the Pope.

I don't see any reason why humans won't advance to deep space travel. Our increasing level of science and technology should help us avoid an extinction level event.

The Great Filter is really a cover-up. We have been visited.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 06:32 PM
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a reply to: randyvs



or what if we were the last surviving intelligent species on the universe?
Or even more likely, what if we are the first?


Interesting question, that I actually believe. I don't think all those planets out there in the Goldilocks Zone as Goldilocks Planets that can support life, do support life, I think they will support life in the future.
Will it be human, perhaps. Will new and exciting creatures that we have never seen before, be there, even more probable. I just don't think they happen to exist yet, but I think they will in the future, and they will only be native to those planets, just like places such as Australia has it's own unique animals.

Imagine being able to visit a planet that is designated a "ZOO" planet sanctuary, teaming with all different life forms, no humans allowed to live there permanently only visit and observe, a sort of planetary safari. Now imagine a thousand of those spread out through our galaxy, I think the future is going to be pretty cool.

edit on 8-3-2015 by Blue_Jay33 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 06:56 PM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

The different life forms on this planet is emmense in numbers.
One is sentient, one uses language and is capable of speech.
Only one.

Think about that.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 07:06 PM
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There May Not Be Even One "Biological" Physical Alien In Our Universe!


Considering the size of the 'observable' universe, and the fact that we do not know how much more it continues where our instrumentation can't see, the probability of intelligent life existing elsewhere in the universe is quite high.

Our own galaxy is stated as being somewhere in the region of 100,000 to 120,000 light years across. That is 100,000 times the distance light can travel in 1 earth year. Our galaxy is just 1 in billions and billions of galaxies, all of differing sizes, but certainly only measurable in light years. When we talk about the observable universe, we are discussing it not as a flat linear plane, but as an expanding bubble, that at the outer-edges of which, we assume there to be no more galaxies and stars. We base this scenario on the premise that our farthest observations in any direction is roughly the same.

Nevertheless, between our galaxy and the farthest reaches we can observe, are billions of galaxies that could in theory be lined up in a linear plane. Now suppose each galaxy was roughly the size of our own Milky Way? That would give us billions of galaxies, each 100,00 light years across. As you know, they tell us that the universe is only 13.5 billion years old. So, if the distance of our limit of observation is roughly the same in all directions, we are saying we can only observe 13.5 billions years of the universe's existence in any direction, and we are also stating that the diameter of the universe (assuming it to be a uniform bubble) is 27 billion years across. To illustrate this, the following 14 dots (each a billion years in size) '..............' represent what we are able to observe in any direction from earth. Whereas the following 27 dots (again, each a billion years across) '...........................' represent the distance from one side of the observable universe to the other in a straight line.

The thing is, if we travelled 13.5 billion years in a straight line to the outer edge of the universe, we would only be able to look back 13.5 billion years, even though the universe continues on for another 13.5 billion years to the other edge of the bubble. Obviously, the 'Big Bang' did not occur where our planet is...we are not in the middle of the universe, so the age we are told the universe to be is only a guestimate based on the weak available light reaching us from the furthest reaches we can see...13.5 billion years in any direction from earth. The point I am making is that we have to consider the sheer scale of the universe when we ask the question about the chances of life having formed on other suitable planets elsewhere. Due to the sheer size of the universe, there is plenty of time for other civilisations to have come forward and bloomed, and to colonise their local star system, which would be the destiny of all intelligent civilisations that survived their infancy and adolescence into a mature and technological civilisation.

Planets are only temporary incubators of life, they have a finite span of existence. A highly evolved civilisation would travel through space and would only use planets within stable star systems as temporary stop points for necessary resources.

We can take the speculation even further. A truly, extremely evolved race would create for themselves synthetic bodies as close to their original bodies as possible, with all the senses and a brain, and as each body reached its limit, they would download all memory content to a new body...a form of immortality ideal for travelling around the universe.

As they travelled around, they would come upon planets where life was evolving, and probably would have adopted a 'non-interventionist' strategy, but would certainly study all the life forms, making sure to avoid contact completely. Only a less-developed civilisation might make contact with an evolving intelligent life form on a planet?



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 07:07 PM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33
The Drake Equation is what you decide to make of it since it's based on a series of probabilities that you provide (at least once you get past the basics of how many stars/ planets are out there). A much older civilization might very well have "uplifted" itself to the Singularity and become virtually immortal. They might not care about creatures like us anymore. Younger civilizations obviously couldn't reach us. So, this lends new meaning to the "Goldilocks Region" since not only do planets have to be a certain optimal range from their stars in order to provide life as we know it, but the civilizations also have to be not too young and not too old to really give a damn about us.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 07:13 PM
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Actually, the diameter of the universe is approximately 93 billion light years, placing the edge of the universe some 47 billion light years...just checked. It's a big place!



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 07:16 PM
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StanSchatt

Younger civilizations obviously couldn't reach us. So, this lends new meaning to the "Goldilocks Region" since not only do planets have to be a certain optimal range from their stars in order to provide life as we know it, but the civilizations also have to be not too young and not too old to really give a damn about us.


Fully agree with this sentiment. Good observation.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 07:22 PM
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originally posted by: Blue_Jay33






Interesting question, that I actually believe. I don't think all those planets out there in the Goldilocks Zone as Goldilocks Planets that can support life, do support life, I think they will support life in the future.
Will it be human, perhaps. Will new and exciting creatures that we have never seen before, be there, even more probable. I just don't think they happen to exist yet, but I think they will in the future, and they will only be native to those planets, just like places such as Australia has it's own unique animals.

 


this line of thought fits nicely with religious dogma...
the 'fallen Angels' came to pester humans because there are no other life forms/Aliens in the universe

~or else~

the 'fallen Angels (Annanuki) came to pester humans because Adamic-Man is the creation experiment of the God-in-Heaven and the 'fallen Angels' completely disregard other sentient beings scattered all through the universe...(just to provoke Man's creator = God, who is in conflict with Lucifer)






Imagine being able to visit a planet that is designated a "ZOO" planet sanctuary, teaming with all different life forms, no humans allowed to live there permanently only visit and observe, a sort of planetary safari. Now imagine a thousand of those spread out through our galaxy, I think the future is going to be pretty cool.

 


Your second line of thought still follows the 'exclusivity of Man/Humans' because it supposes that Man will eventually do it's panspermia protocol after humans jump ahead of the status of Angels (as promised by scriptures)Mankind will supposedly populate the whole universe with devotees/believers who sing the Praise of God... in between the necessary upkeep-maintenance-shepherding of all these ZOO-Worlds

if the choices are eternal life of singing 'Praise-God' or being a planetary zoo attendant... that prospect would be Dismal and not be an energizing Reward for rejecting Satan



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 07:27 PM
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originally posted by: Blue_Jay33
Why do I say that ?

If you read the "Rare Earth Hypothesis" with the "Fermi Paradox", you could come to that conclusion.

Rare Earth Hypothesis

Fermi Paradox

Now we are all biased in one way or another based on our previous education and personal belief system.
For example I do believe there are Aliens strictly by definition but they don't have physical bodies, they don't live on any planet, and they live in a spiritual dimension, different from our physical one. Some are good and some are bad, you can probably figure out who I am talking about here, but that is a different topic.

But what I find fascinating is that some of those that believe that life can just spontaneously create itself, also seem to think, it's such a rare event that it is possible this is the only planet it might have occurred on.
This is brought out in "The Great Filter"
The Great Filter


I think you are right, sentient intelligence could by definition inhabit any form of matter in the universe. It is in us and we are on the face of it just base matter, replicating by cellular division. In our ignorance we think that all sentient beings should look like us. Where we may be so limited, by the physical constraints of our nature, we might have a hard job even identifying, sentient life, and be totally unable to define it.

When you look at any animal, its defined by its niche, and most probably thinks just like we do, and not just our genetically close primates. We are defined by our niche, we think it is wider than the other animals. But none the less limited, by physicality. That's what physicality does, it defines you, but the mind isn't defined by it, but is anchored by it, until its purpose is done. So yes the aliens are inter dimensional beings, that may or may not have once been us. That's not saying regarding our habitual ignorance, we might not be the most intelligent beings on this planet, but because of our centrism, fail to understand that its a high possibility.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 07:40 PM
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If intelligent life could exist in the outer planets where the temperature runs at -200 Kelvin their idea of the Goldilocks zone would be quite different. They would immediately reject anyplace with liquid water! Much too hot for life as they know it. That's another key to life and intelligence is not restricted to where we expect it.
It is the only example we have to work with so that explains the bias we and they have to apply to the question.
Another question is based on the speed of life. Our 3 score and ten might be anothers 1000 years or more. Life knows no limits.
The odds of us being the only intelligent species that exist in the galaxy is very low. The odds against us meeting aliens are either very remote or they are already here. More likely to be remote than to have a humanoid type creature visit this little insignificant planet.



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