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Workers’ Comp Benefits: How Much is a Limb Worth?

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posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 07:15 PM
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If you have any plans to loose an arm or a leg, don't do it in Kansas, Rhode Island, Massachusetts or Alabama.

The average compensation for one arm, leg, hand or whatever.

projects.propublica.org...

edit on 7-3-2015 by CharlesT because: huhn




posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 07:20 PM
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a reply to: CharlesT



NOTE: Compensation for the loss of certain body parts is only one part of a larger system. States may be more or less generous in other aspects of their workers' comp benefits.


Now I have no way of knowing what the other parts of the Workers' Comp are, but the bald amounts for the limb itself are only part of the whole picture as this note at the bottom of the page admits.



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 07:21 PM
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wow Oregon's forking out $80k for a pinky.
KAAACHING!



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 07:30 PM
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My little brother lost an eye. He only has two so that 50% disabled. He had a cornea replacement so his eye looks normal but, he can't see out of it. Workers comp caused this due to the anti rejection Rx being very expensive and there were times the Rx wasn't filled.

He describes this eye as being for others. You have to pay really close attention to notice my brother will only sit in certain spots or will pretend to he occupied with something so the people around him don't notice he has a huge blind spot. However he was traumatized by the way people were looking at his damaged eye and even the eye patch so he finds this to be better.



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: CharlesT

Dominant hand/arm or not? A bit more if so!

Actually the real money starts to flow with the psychological damage that the loss of limb causes. The injured worker should fall into a depression linked to the limb loss. Keep those symptoms long enough for the psychological component to be declared permanent. That boosts the compensation.

I use to argue injury cases for a large company against it's workers...in a previous life. I'm a much better person now.



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 07:37 PM
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originally posted by: CharlesT
If you have any plans to loose an arm or a leg, don't do it in Kansas, Rhode Island, Massachusetts or Alabama.

The average compensation for one arm, leg, hand or whatever.

projects.propublica.org...



Seems like Nevada is the state to have anything chopped off, or amputated due to injury. You'll get paid more there generally. Whelp! Looks like I have to pack up my apartment in PA and move to Nevada. I'll let you guys know when I get to the Gambling City Of Light! LOL





posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

You may be entirely right about that but I just ran across this article and considering that I am a relative newbie here, I thought this would be a good lighthearted simple post just to get me started. I'm still learning many of the ropes around here.



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 10:58 PM
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a reply to: CharlesT

You werent by chance listen to this radio show called the mens room were you?



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 03:48 PM
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a reply to: American-philosopher

Have no idea what you are talking about.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 04:03 PM
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a reply to: CharlesT

Hmmm. A number of years ago my husband got paid for a serious laceration he got at work. As I recall, the dollar amount was based upon the length of the cut. We live in RI, so now I'm wondering how much he would have been compensated if we lived in another state! I had no idea it varied so widely.

To be honest, although more money would've been nice, it wouldn't have really been necessary. His medical bills were covered, as was any missed salary, plus some extra for his troubles.




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