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Atlanta garbage man spends 30 days in jail for going to work too early

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posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: DenyObfuscation

Yeah. I'm not sure how the whole crew (usually at least 2 people) got out there that early.

Also not sure his attorney worked the agency angle. It doesn't seem to me the company is off the hook here. www.hg.org...




posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity

So you want him fired? If the employer is "On the hook" for his actions, which may have violated what they told him to do, what else should the employer do?

ETA:


Yeah. I'm not sure how the whole crew (usually at least 2 people) got out there that early.

Who knows how early they start? In many areas they pick up at 5 or earlier, if there aren't restrictions.
edit on 7-3-2015 by DenyObfuscation because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 04:48 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Anyafaj


So chances are, he didn't just decide to get up at 3 or 4 in the morning to pick up their garbage at 5. I mean let's face it, who would?
You are making an assumption. I get up early myself. If I could start earlier I'd be fine with that since it would mean getting home earlier.


I mean let's face it, who would? 9 times out of 10, dispatch scheduled him in those hours, so if the residents were ticked, they should have taken it up with WM, NOT the employee
The residents took it up with the authorities, not the employee. The company had been fined previously. It didn't work.

But we don't really know what his route or schedule was, do we?



I will admit, we don't. But the residents should have taken it up with his employer. His employer could have reprimanded the employee, suspended him, (which they claim they did), even fired him and hired an employee who would have followed the rules. They could have retrained him and made him realize that just because there was construction did not mean he could start early, and suspended him for a certain period of time, and had him personally apologize to the residents. Jail time was harsh though. I do think a fine might have been more appropriate.



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 04:48 PM
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originally posted by: DenyObfuscation
a reply to: ~Lucidity

So you want him fired? If the employer is "On the hook" for his actions, which may have violated what they told him to do, what else should the employer do?

How the hell did you interpret that as wanting him fired? Weird.



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 04:55 PM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity


How the hell did you interpret that as wanting him fired? Weird.

I didn't. I did ask a question, however. A question that might follow from the logical outcome.

What do you expect from working the agency angle?



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 04:56 PM
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a reply to: DenyObfuscation

Just what it says. That the company is probably not off the hook and his attorney sucked.
edit on 3/7/2015 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 04:56 PM
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a reply to: Anyafaj



Jail time was harsh though.

As I have previously said, I agree.



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 04:59 PM
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originally posted by: nonspecific
Although I feel sorry for the guy I think I have to commend the judge in this case.

The company is obviously breaking the rules and paying the fines as it is benifical to them.

By punishing the employee it gives other employees good reason not to work out of hours and stop the company breaking the rules in the first place.

As I said it's a bummer for the individual but looks like the judge took the only way they could see to stop it happening.


Or they could throw the CEO in jail for ignoreing the fines?

O wait you cant jail rich people in America.....



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: crazyewok



Or they could throw the CEO in jail for ignoreing the fines?

The fines were ignored?



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 05:01 PM
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Well if they had been driving a Silent Pack 4000 totally electric garbage truck....we wouldn't be having this conversation. But since it hasn't been invented yet...we are. Anyways I think our judicial system has hit an all time low when it throws even the garbage man in jail. I think they should have allowed the "offended" neighbors to call the garbage man's house at 5 am the following Sunday just to even the score and call it good. Or better yet they could have driven over to his house and threw a bunch of empty garbage cans on the ground at 5am...then they could have gotten a good laugh and went about their lives without the garbage man spending the next 14 wks of his free time in jail.



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 05:01 PM
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originally posted by: ~Lucidity
a reply to: DenyObfuscation

Just what it says. That the company is probably not off the hook and his attorney sucked.

How does the "Agency angle" help McGill?

If he did what he was told to not do?



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 05:06 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: crazyewok



Or they could throw the CEO in jail for ignoreing the fines?

The fines were ignored?


Well they were being issued fines but still allowing drivers to collect trash early.


So the fines were not working.

Hence the owners of the company should be brought to court for that.



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: DenyObfuscation

Where I work, we have employees and contractors who do what they were told not to do all the time, even when we had agreements signed and training records, and we are still liable for their actions. I think Waste Management pulled a fast one. I could be wrong.



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 05:16 PM
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originally posted by: crazyewok

originally posted by: nonspecific
Although I feel sorry for the guy I think I have to commend the judge in this case.

The company is obviously breaking the rules and paying the fines as it is benifical to them.

By punishing the employee it gives other employees good reason not to work out of hours and stop the company breaking the rules in the first place.

As I said it's a bummer for the individual but looks like the judge took the only way they could see to stop it happening.


Or they could throw the CEO in jail for ignoreing the fines?

O wait you cant jail rich people in America.....


Good point, here in the UK we jail rich people all the time.

I'm glad our system is so uncorrupt



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 05:16 PM
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a reply to: crazyewok


Well they were being issued fines but still allowing drivers to collect trash early.
Not according to the company. The company says the drivers were instructed not to do so.




Hence the owners of the company should be brought to court for that.

On what charge?



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 05:31 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Same charge as the guy who ended up charged.

At the end of the day they handed him the keys to drive the truck.

They also could of taken discaplinary action.



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 05:32 PM
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originally posted by: nonspecific

originally posted by: crazyewok

originally posted by: nonspecific
Although I feel sorry for the guy I think I have to commend the judge in this case.

The company is obviously breaking the rules and paying the fines as it is benifical to them.

By punishing the employee it gives other employees good reason not to work out of hours and stop the company breaking the rules in the first place.

As I said it's a bummer for the individual but looks like the judge took the only way they could see to stop it happening.


Or they could throw the CEO in jail for ignoreing the fines?

O wait you cant jail rich people in America.....


Good point, here in the UK we jail rich people all the time.

I'm glad our system is so uncorrupt


Good point

But we dont go around saying we are "the land of the free" and pretending we have some sort of superior system to the world



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 05:34 PM
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a reply to: crazyewok

Same charge as the guy who ended up charged.
Except that the CEO was not disturbing the peace. The driver was, after having been instructed to not do so. Should the CEO get cited if the driver was busted for speeding?


At the end of the day they handed him the keys to drive the truck.
Beginning of the day. But unless he was not qualified to drive it, so what?


They also could of taken discaplinary action.
Yes, they could have. So what?


Yes, the sentence was harsh. Is that a reason to try to put the blame elsewhere?
edit on 3/7/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 05:47 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: crazyewok


Well they were being issued fines but still allowing drivers to collect trash early.
Not according to the company. The company says the drivers were instructed not to do so.




Hence the owners of the company should be brought to court for that.

On what charge?


You don't get out of the yard without the dispatch.

Peace



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 05:49 PM
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originally posted by: jude11

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: crazyewok


Well they were being issued fines but still allowing drivers to collect trash early.
Not according to the company. The company says the drivers were instructed not to do so.




Hence the owners of the company should be brought to court for that.

On what charge?


You don't get out of the yard without the dispatch.

Peace


I have to agree with this, I live in a different country but cannot imagine a company "allowing" drivers to turn up early and just drive off without signing out with permission.

Do you not have tacho's in the US?




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