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Scientists Have Discovered Another Earth With Probable Life!

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posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 12:39 PM
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There is a world similar to Kepler-186f which was discovered more recently, much closer to us. I created a thread about it when it was announced but I suspect the OP of this thread didn't see it either so I'll repost this:

Epic Win! - Revived Kepler "K2" Mission Bags Nearby Habitable Planet




NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, despite being hobbled by the loss of critical guidance systems, has discovered a star with three planets only slightly larger than Earth. The outermost planet orbits in the "Goldilocks" zone, a region where surface temperatures could be moderate enough for liquid water and perhaps life, to exist.

The star, EPIC 201367065, is a cool red M-dwarf about half the size and mass of our own sun. At a distance of 150 light years, the star ranks among the top 10 nearest stars known to have transiting planets. The star's proximity means it's bright enough for astronomers to study the planets' atmospheres to determine whether they are like Earth's atmosphere and possibly conducive to life.

"A thin atmosphere made of nitrogen and oxygen has allowed life to thrive on Earth. But nature is full of surprises. Many exoplanets discovered by the Kepler mission are enveloped by thick, hydrogen-rich atmospheres that are probably incompatible with life as we know it," said Ian Crossfield, the University of Arizona astronomer who led the study.

The three planets are 2.1, 1.7 and 1.5 times the size of Earth. The smallest and outermost planet, at 1.5 Earth radii, orbits far enough from its host star that it receives levels of light from its star similar to those received by Earth from the sun, said UC Berkeley graduate student Erik Petigura. He discovered the planets Jan. 6 while conducting a computer analysis of the Kepler data NASA has made available to astronomers. In order from farthest to closest to their star, the three planets receive 10.5, 3.2 and 1.4 times the light intensity of Earth, Petigura calculated.

"Most planets we have found to date are scorched. This system is the closest star with lukewarm transiting planets," Petigura said. "There is a very real possibility that the outermost planet is rocky like Earth, which means this planet could have the right temperature to support liquid water oceans."



The difference is that unlike Kepler 186f, EPIC 201367065d is close enough to us that it's atmosphere may be able to be studied by the James Webb Space Telescope. Kepler-186f is too far for that at over 1,500 light years away (10 times as far as EPIC 201367065d).

The other difference of course is size. Kepler 186f made news because it is very similar in size to the Earth (1.2 Earth radii) and was the first Earth size planet discovered in a habitable zone, where as EPIC 201367065d is slightly larger (1.5 Earth radii).

The most important takeaway regarding this thread is that Kepler-186f isn't even the most habitable extrasolar planet known. Those were announced recently (in January) at the AAS meeting here in Seattle.



Click here for a list of habitable zone exoplanets ranked and organized by their similarity to Earth or Earth Similarity Index (ESI) number - (spoiler: Kepler 186f ranks #25 on the list).
edit on 8-3-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: JadeStar

Good posts

edit on 8-3-2015 by OnionHead because: Posts not post



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 12:50 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: BigBrotherDarkness
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

"Why is it depicted as being dry and dusty when it's possible that it has water and a thick atmosphere?" Very good question... as sources come in? Change is inevitable some prefer to keep their diaper full from past abuse. Pangaea, is one hell of a state.

Mars once had an ocean... news or something a Viking once said?


I really don't get your point. Sure -- It seems likely from the data collected over the years that Mars was once a very wet planet. For example, the rover Curiosity has found signs of ancient stream beds and ancient lake beds, and the rover Opportunity has found gypsum, which is thought to only form in wet environments.

However, what does that have to do with what I said? I was only replying to the person who asked "why are they showing Kepler 186F as being Earth-like when it could possibly look Mars-like?" My answer was that if they showed it as being mars-like, then people would ask "Why are they showing it as Mars-like when it could be Earth-like".

My point was that no matter how they showed it, someone would complain that we don't know enough about it to be sure it looks that way.



I wonder why the original poster didn't use the original graphics which were presented by NASA at the time of discovery which kind of made that point? Like you said, we do not know the density of Kepler-186f. Without even knowing this basic fact it is near impossible to imagine what the planet might look like.







edit on 8-3-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-3-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 12:54 PM
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a reply to: JadeStar

Its what I have been sating over and over in this thread.

We cant really have any idea on Kepler-186f suitability to known life until we get more data on its chemical composition.
edit on 8-3-2015 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 12:58 PM
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originally posted by: Blue_Jay33
But is it really a class M Planet ?
Do we know for a fact ?
Or do we just think it might be a "M" class?


It is an M-class planet on a list of M-class and other planets.

The M classification is a thermal one.



Based on what we know about the star it orbits Kepler-186f is a Warm Terran or M-Class planet and there are plenty of others M-class planets and M-class planet candidates, some having a 94% Earth Similarity number





If you have not read the "Rare Earth Hypothesis", it's an interesting read.

Rare Earth Hypothesis


Yeah, but more and more the Rare Earth Hypothesis is looking like the Flat Earth Hypothesis.



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 01:02 PM
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originally posted by: crazyewok
a reply to: JadeStar

Its what I have been sating over and over in this thread.

We cant really have any idea on Kepler-186f suitability to known life until we get more data on its chemical composition.


Exactly.

One of the things that makes me cringe is when people jump the gun on stuff like this and try to steal tomorrow's potential headline as if it already happened.

Kepler 186f might be some lush world similar to Earth or the moon in the movie Avatar, but it could just as easily be an icy desert like Mars or Hoth from Star Wars.

We simply don't know. Without knowing what kind of density it has and what kind of atmosphere it has it is impossible to know. But based simply on thermal absorption if it had a similar composition as Earth it might be a lush world.

We might someday know, but it will take much better instruments in space to even begin to know due to its 500 light year distance.

I am more excited about the worlds we're finding much closer to home, within 200 light years and especially within 100 light years because these are the worlds we will be able to get density numbers on, be able to closely study their atmospheres and sometime soon be able to take direct images of and eventually map.
edit on 8-3-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 05:27 PM
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originally posted by: BigBrotherDarkness


Then read your own post?


Jeezus, A little defensive eh? Which post, I posted a few times?


it was in response to your own statement.


Which statement??? Do you not know how to use the quote button?


I asked for clarity and you came back confused? where's your head it? here now there? or spinning everywhere? stop drop and roll. Deny ignorance or else you're a troll. I bow to ewoks.


No, actually you came back with a rude response for no reason whatsoever, and you still have not managed to simply quote or tell me what you're asking? A little slow are you?

Anyway, by looking at your epic failure of a thread, and your endless irrational babbling whenever you respond to anyone, it's not a surprise you come up with such nonsense. You really should listen to what a lot of people here are trying to explain to you, because they have much more knowledge on the subject than you do. Good luck! ~$heopleNation



posted on Mar, 8 2015 @ 07:07 PM
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originally posted by: nerbot

Drake's Equation is so out of date and now seems obsolete. Me thinks a few more factors need to be added (constantly).


I agree that more variables could be accounted for in that particular equation, which may serve to make it more accurate, but the bottom line is that most added variables will only increase the number of potential alien civilizations. Any variables that actually decreased the number of postulated alien civilizations in the universe would not really matter much however, because the number of such civilizations would still be astoundingly large. So at the end of the day, any equation similar to the Drake equation will undoubtedly arrive at a hypothesized number of alien civilizations that is still very large. However, I think it is a mistake for any scientist to assume that life can only exist on planets with earth-like characteristics.

Life, and even intelligent life, could exist on planets that would be uninhabitable for humans. For instance, respiration could potentially occur in intelligent life despite the absence of oxygen. Perhaps on some planets water is not even needed for life. It is hard for us to imagine intelligent life developing under conditions extremely different from what we experience on earth, but given the billions of years of evolution that may have occurred on these planets, life could have adapted and then thrived into present times.

So while we disregard certain planets, maybe because they are not in the habitable zone and thus are either too hot or too cold, and instead focus on planets similar to our own, we could be skipping over life on such planets, while the earth-like planet has no life present whatsoever. But it is actually easier to find intelligent life than non-intelligent life, because intelligent life forms who have advanced to at least our level of technology, or maybe have surpassed it, will likely leave signs that we should be able to detect at some point in the future. Of course it does make sense to look for earth-like planets, because we are going off of what we know...that life exists only on earth. Thus look for earth-like planets. When a planet is so far away however, there is not really any way to spot surface life, or even the presence of technology. The distances are just too great. Plus, we are seeing the planet as it existed 500 light years ago, so by the time we got around to being advanced enough to detect the life that may be there, it could be gone.

So while the presence of life is likely to be found all over the universe, detecting such a presence is something that will be a long time in coming in my opinion. In fact, it seems much more likely to me that any intelligent life we discover will be more advanced than we are, therefore THEY should be the ones looking for us, and will likely find us first. I am not one who is keen on establishing contact with alien civilizations. I just feel that the dangers are too great. We are hoping the ET's will be benevolent, but is this a risk worth taking? Especially if they are so advanced that they could take over our planet if they felt so inclined. I just think the risk is too great. And if aliens already are visiting earth, as some believe, what have they done to help us? Abducting people, which scares and traumatizes the abductee, without conferring any benefit to them whatsoever, is something that points directly to the malevolent nature of any ET's visiting earth. If alien believers are right about the aliens visiting earth and accounting for eyewitness reports, then they are probably right about the abductions as well. And again, does it not seem that there has been much more negativity than positivity associated with the UFO phenomenon? I give everyone this warning: stay away from aliens. They cannot be trusted.



posted on Mar, 9 2015 @ 07:29 AM
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Watch we'll run in to another life-form from another planet and it'll end up having all the same problems as us, with the same hopes that some of us have, that aliens would have solution to our problems.

Aliens: so you solve this problem yet?
Us: Nope
Us: You solve this one?
Aliens: Nope



posted on Mar, 9 2015 @ 07:32 AM
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originally posted by: ObjectZero
Watch we'll run in to another life-form from another planet and it'll end up having all the same problems as us, with the same hopes that some of us have, that aliens would have solution to our problems.

Aliens: so you solve this problem yet?
Us: Nope
Us: You solve this one?
Aliens: Nope


If there is any life in our local 100 light year neighborhood its likely non sentient or pre industrial as chances are we would have picked up signals by now.

If they are pre industrial us humans will likely be the evil aliens.



posted on Mar, 9 2015 @ 09:56 AM
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originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: BigBrotherDarkness

originally posted by: JadeStar
a reply to: BigBrotherDarkness


You realize this story is not news right? Did you do a search for Kepler 186f before you posted? I think not.

Hello and welcome to LAST SPRING:

NASA Announces First Earth Twin in Habitable Zone Discovered by Kepler - posted on Apr, 17 2014 @ 01:10 PM


Try reading the whole thread...


Did you try reading this year old Kepler 186f thread created when it was ACTUALLY discovered before creating yours?

I have read this thread and the whole thread is still based on your laughable premise that:

A) Kepler 186f is a NEW discovery when in reality it's a year old.

B) That Kepler 186f probably has life when in reality we do not know that and have no way to know that in the near term due to it's distance.


So just how is your thread different from the one I started a year ago or any of the other threads on ATS talking about Kepler 186f?

Try using the SEARCH function before starting threads.

Kepler 186f is an exciting world but it is not news. Just news to you.


I am sorry JadeStar I used the search function... as others will tell you it is lacking. I give you full credit to bringing this exo-planet that George Takei shared talking about a discussion he and a friend were having. Having no search returned of it mentioned, I decided to honor him to continue the discussion so if he was to see it as a thanks and a sorry he lost a dear friend... thank you for adding your hard worked for information to it... I have not been studying this topic... I shared in the op what I knew, battled a torrent of probability bots, a MIB flashing and have made it this far.

I do not wish to continue on with it and since you are the expert on this particular planet and it looks like other ones... then please by all means continue on as if it were JadeStars thread. The post stars and alert flags mean nothing to me, please give the ones you have given here to myself to JadeStar instead please, if that doesn't happen then posters pease go to JadeStars posting and show her some love.

JadeStar may you live long and prosper as someone this thread is dedicated to was known for saying, some would say there is no death, and some would say being alive, with water and food and shelter from the storm is prosperous enough. Sabai! the Thai word meaning not some massage business. It's all good the toe step was an unintentional. Accident, Springer the Kudos you gave via PM please give those to JadeStar instead. I shall go clean my bowl and sorry for the $h!£ I left on your floor. This dog knows mu tricks.



posted on Mar, 9 2015 @ 11:04 AM
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originally posted by: BigBrotherDarkness

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: BigBrotherDarkness

originally posted by: JadeStar
a reply to: BigBrotherDarkness


You realize this story is not news right? Did you do a search for Kepler 186f before you posted? I think not.

Hello and welcome to LAST SPRING:

NASA Announces First Earth Twin in Habitable Zone Discovered by Kepler - posted on Apr, 17 2014 @ 01:10 PM


Try reading the whole thread...


Did you try reading this year old Kepler 186f thread created when it was ACTUALLY discovered before creating yours?

I have read this thread and the whole thread is still based on your laughable premise that:

A) Kepler 186f is a NEW discovery when in reality it's a year old.

B) That Kepler 186f probably has life when in reality we do not know that and have no way to know that in the near term due to it's distance.


So just how is your thread different from the one I started a year ago or any of the other threads on ATS talking about Kepler 186f?

Try using the SEARCH function before starting threads.

Kepler 186f is an exciting world but it is not news. Just news to you.


I am sorry JadeStar I used the search function... as others will tell you it is lacking. I give you full credit to bringing this exo-planet that George Takei shared talking about a discussion he and a friend were having. Having no search returned of it mentioned, I decided to honor him to continue the discussion so if he was to see it as a thanks and a sorry he lost a dear friend... thank you for adding your hard worked for information to it... I have not been studying this topic... I shared in the op what I knew, battled a torrent of probability bots, a MIB flashing and have made it this far.

I do not wish to continue on with it and since you are the expert on this particular planet and it looks like other ones... then please by all means continue on as if it were JadeStars thread. The post stars and alert flags mean nothing to me, please give the ones you have given here to myself to JadeStar instead please, if that doesn't happen then posters pease go to JadeStars posting and show her some love.

JadeStar may you live long and prosper as someone this thread is dedicated to was known for saying, some would say there is no death, and some would say being alive, with water and food and shelter from the storm is prosperous enough. Sabai! the Thai word meaning not some massage business. It's all good the toe step was an unintentional. Accident, Springer the Kudos you gave via PM please give those to JadeStar instead. I shall go clean my bowl and sorry for the $h!£ I left on your floor. This dog knows mu tricks.



Hey, it's ok, we all make mistakes. And I understand you wanted to honor the passing of Leonard Nimoy now. I too was moved by Leonard Nimoy's passing. May you live long and prosper as well and if you ever want to collaborate on an exoplanet thread or just learn more about them send me a U2U. I'd be happy to help.


edit on 9-3-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2015 @ 08:46 PM
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a reply to: JadeStar

if you want to help, empty your cup... the stars runneth over.



posted on Mar, 10 2015 @ 01:29 PM
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originally posted by: Elementalist
Basically this logic of seeking for another life-supporting planet is bias and flawed IMO.

"Look for planets that look like earth, hold water en mass, and carbon-5-based beings with semi or more intelligence.

Your looking for only what you belive humans can be supported, in terms of planetary environment.

God forbid their may be beings made of different biology systems and chemicals/elements. Who could survive or FLOURISH in enviromental conditions Man cannot.


I've long been of this opinion. There's no limit to the possibilities, but we insist on putting limits on life.



posted on Mar, 10 2015 @ 01:47 PM
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originally posted by: UFGarvin
Life is not 'probable' there. It's statistically un-probable. Highly so.


Your world must be so rigidly satisfying.



posted on Mar, 10 2015 @ 01:48 PM
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originally posted by: jordan77

originally posted by: Elementalist
Basically this logic of seeking for another life-supporting planet is bias and flawed IMO.

"Look for planets that look like earth, hold water en mass, and carbon-5-based beings with semi or more intelligence.

Your looking for only what you belive humans can be supported, in terms of planetary environment.

God forbid their may be beings made of different biology systems and chemicals/elements. Who could survive or FLOURISH in enviromental conditions Man cannot.


I've long been of this opinion. There's no limit to the possibilities, but we insist on putting limits on life.


Science fully understands that there in fact probably is lots of "life as we don't know it", but science has no idea how to test for that life. We may not know it even if we find it. Therefore, they look for the type of life that they could spot more easily, which is "life as we know it".

Could there be life that uses methane instead of water? Sure. However, scientists analyzing the spectra of an atmosphere where that sort of life thrives may not even be able to tell, because they don't understand the life processes of that type of life. They do, however, understand the life processes of our type of life, and they think they could spot those processes by analyzing the spectrum of an exoplanet atmosphere.

Mainstream science knows that "life as we know it" is NOT the only possible life out there; it's just the kind we know how to spot when we find it. Here is a post from page 2 of this thread that discusses some of NASA astrobiologist Chris McKay's ideas about "life as we don't know it" possibly living on Saturn Moon's Titan:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

So it is NOT true that science is putting limits on possibilities -- it seems to be a strawman argument to suggest that they are limiting their ideas of "life". Science knows about other possible forms of life, and are actively researching to possibilities of those non-earth-type forms of life -- such as the investigation into the possibility of a methane-based organism consuming acetylene and hydrogen on Titan I mention in my previous post that I linked above.


edit on 3/10/2015 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2015 @ 01:06 PM
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This latest XKCD comic sums it up so nicely...


xkcd.com...



posted on Apr, 28 2015 @ 01:16 PM
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Is it just me, or does it appear the entire planet is still covered in water? I believe planet Earth was once covered in water. Maybe it's younger than Earth? Or has thriving but only aquatic creatures. (I can't watch the vid today). : (

In any event, great thread.



posted on Apr, 28 2015 @ 01:22 PM
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originally posted by: jordan77
I've long been of this opinion. There's no limit to the possibilities, but we insist on putting limits on life.

We don't do it. Nature does. Too much heat. Too much cold. Too much radiation. A few degrees either side of a very narrow margin.

Yeah, it might not limit some forms of life we might consider "exotic" like crystal matrices or vapor creatures or energy beings, but for the most part we look at life as a structure that moves with a reason and reproduces using material from its local environment. Cold halts activity and heat destroys structure. Show me life that thrives in boiling magma or in the dark cold of interstellar space.

edit on 28-4-2015 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2015 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: pauljs75
This latest XKCD comic sums it up so nicely...


xkcd.com...



That's pretty awesome isn't it?


For those who haven't gone there....






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