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I saw a light in the sky the other night, what was it?

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posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 06:01 AM
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Hi ATSers, thought that the guys on this forum might know what I saw the other night. It was either the 3rd or the 4th, cant be quite sure now as I have been hectically busy this week. I was looking at the sky and I saw a light that looked like a bright start appear and disappear in the space of 2 seconds. Its brightness and size wasnt as bright as the brightest stars but close.

I thought it was a plane but the light did not reappear and it was white not red or green. Or maybe it had turned its landing lights on and I happened to be in line with them but I live 100km from the nearest airport and if it was a small plane I would have seen it or heard it. Or, I thought, maybe it was a satellite catching the sun's rays and reflecting them back to me, the sun had completely set about 1 and half hours earlier.

It was positioned about a third of the way from Orion's belt and the northern horizon, the belt almost pointing to it. It was about 10:30 at night and I live in the Australian Eastern Summer Time zone. I was between 36 30' and 37 degrees south at the time.

Any ideas what I saw?




posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 06:04 AM
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a reply to: Cinrad

Sounds like an Iridium flare.

If you can recall the exact date we should be able to tell if this was the case or not.



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 06:08 AM
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I believe you saw a light up there. I see them too sometimes. Dont be afraid you are not alone.

usually if i see one i pretend its an alien spacecraft. its more fun than just seeing some dumb old satellite. next time your outside listen music score for the old INVADERS tv show. Then you will get the full experience.



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 06:09 AM
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I think you saw a very remote satellite glint briefly in the sun. Such satellite flares are fairly common, if you known when and where to look. The brightest ones, caused by Iridium satellites, are the most impressive and can outshine Venus.

You can find out about satellites flying over your location at heavens-above.com...



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 06:22 AM
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I agree, it sounds like you got a quick glimpse of a satellite, or possibly the ISS. If you can remember when you saw it, and what direction you were facing, you should be able to verify it, and even identify what satellite it was.

Out here in the desert at night, with clear skies you can often see several of them passing from one end of the sky to the other. They would seem unusual, though, if you didn't know what they were.



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 06:24 AM
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originally posted by: AdmireTheDistance
I agree, it sounds like you got a quick glimpse of a satellite, or possibly the ISS. If you can remember when you saw it, and what direction you were facing, you should be able to verify it, and even identify what satellite it was.

Out here in the desert at night, with clear skies you can often see several of them passing from one end of the sky to the other. They would seem unusual, though, if you didn't know what they were.



Typically the ISS will be visible for over minute or more. I love seeing satellite flares. My wife and i regularly go onto our balcony to watch em.



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 06:25 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Never heard of iridium flares, interesting. I had a look at the animation of an iridium flare and it wasnt like that, it was stationary, like I said, the whole thing was over in 2 seconds, maybe 1 second. It wasnt quite a flash, it brightened and dimmed but very quickly.

As for the date, I am leaning towards tuesday 3rd

I think it might have been an uncontrolled satelite flare from the description in the link


These satellites are also described as "tumbling". This category includes a lot of rotating rocket bodies, some failed Iridium satellites, ALOS satellite (which can produce flashes up to −10 mag), etc. The most important and valuable information about tumbling satellites is a period of flashes. It can vary from 0.3–0.5 seconds (rapidly rotating objects) to a minute or more (slowly rotating objects).


edit on 6/3/15 by Cinrad because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 06:39 AM
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originally posted by: Cinrad
a reply to: wildespace

Never heard of iridium flares, interesting. I had a look at the animation of an iridium flare and it wasnt like that, it was stationary, like I said, the whole thing was over in 2 seconds, maybe 1 second. It wasnt quite a flash, it brightened and dimmed but very quickly.

As for the date, I am leaning towards tuesday 3rd

I think it might have been an uncontrolled satelite flare from the description in the link


These satellites are also described as "tumbling". This category includes a lot of rotating rocket bodies, some failed Iridium satellites, ALOS satellite (which can produce flashes up to −10 mag), etc. The most important and valuable information about tumbling satellites is a period of flashes. It can vary from 0.3–0.5 seconds (rapidly rotating objects) to a minute or more (slowly rotating objects).



Could have been a meteorite falling towards you. You would see it as a bright flash. Ive seen a few of those during the Perseids.



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 07:04 AM
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posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 08:09 AM
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originally posted by: Cinrad
a reply to: wildespace

Never heard of iridium flares, interesting. I had a look at the animation of an iridium flare and it wasnt like that, it was stationary, like I said, the whole thing was over in 2 seconds, maybe 1 second. It wasnt quite a flash, it brightened and dimmed but very quickly.


Some iridium flares can seem to barely be moving. Perhaps it moved so little, and didn't have any point of reference directly adjacent to it, that you didn't notice the motion aspect of it:



edit on 3/6/2015 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 08:12 AM
link   

originally posted by: Cinrad
a reply to: wildespace

Never heard of iridium flares, interesting. I had a look at the animation of an iridium flare and it wasnt like that, it was stationary, like I said, the whole thing was over in 2 seconds, maybe 1 second. It wasnt quite a flash, it brightened and dimmed but very quickly.

As for the date, I am leaning towards tuesday 3rd

I think it might have been an uncontrolled satelite flare from the description in the link


These satellites are also described as "tumbling". This category includes a lot of rotating rocket bodies, some failed Iridium satellites, ALOS satellite (which can produce flashes up to −10 mag), etc. The most important and valuable information about tumbling satellites is a period of flashes. It can vary from 0.3–0.5 seconds (rapidly rotating objects) to a minute or more (slowly rotating objects).



I suggest you find out when a -8 magnitude flare is going to happen where you live (go to heavens above website and make sure to set your viewing location first)...They are a wonder to behold. FAR brighter than Venus, its incredible to see. I once saw two -8's seconds apart and literally on top of each other. Stunning.




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