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Researchers create world's first 3D-printed jet engines.

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posted on Mar, 5 2015 @ 11:42 AM
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Because this is in the line of my work, someone sent me an email containing this link, and it is real amazing! I had no idea that 3D printing was this advanced! I mean I work with 3D printers, but never knew that you can use it to print Jet Engines!






Working with colleagues from Deakin University and CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation), researchers from Australia's Monash University have created the world's first 3D-printed jet engine. While they were at it, they created the world's second one, too. One of them is currently on display at the International Air Show in Avalon, Australia, while the other can be seen at the headquarters of French aerospace company Microturbo, in Toulouse.

A team from the Monash Centre for Additive Manufacturing and spin-off company Amaero started with an older gas turbine engine contributed by Microturbo (Safran). Still in working order, the small engine was used for auxiliary power in aircraft such as the Falcon 20 business jet.

Led by Prof. Xinhua Wu, the team proceeded to take the engine apart, and scan all the individual components. Using computer models obtained from those scans, a laser was then utilized to selectively melt metal alloy powder, building up two copies of each component in successive layers. When those parts were subsequently assembled, two metal replicas of the original engine were produced.

The project took a year to complete, and received funding from multiple groups including the Australian Research Council. It has reportedly resulted in a number of aerospace companies expressing interest in developing components at the university – using 3D printing, components that previously would have taken months to design and manufacture could be made in weeks.





www.gizmag.com...



How many of you has had the opportunity to work with 3D printers?




posted on Mar, 5 2015 @ 11:50 AM
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a reply to: IndependentOpinion

Very cool!

Though, I must admit, I wouldn't want to be in the room when it is tested.




posted on Mar, 5 2015 @ 11:51 AM
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3d printers will replace factories shortly after china will be eliminated as a place for fabrication. All things will be printed in the future and we will laugh on how backwards we used to do it.



posted on Mar, 5 2015 @ 11:55 AM
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a reply to: greencmp

Thats true. But I would like to see the test.



posted on Mar, 5 2015 @ 12:09 PM
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a reply to: Shadow Herder

I disagree.

3D printers are great for one offs and small runs.

However when you have to produce a few million of something in a month. 3D printing will not be able to keep up with demand.

Personally I'd like to see them do a stress test with the parts. Create an engine and run it continuously for as long as possible.



posted on Mar, 5 2015 @ 12:10 PM
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It makes sense to do this with old air turbines. The problem is that to construct a replacement engine, you have to keep all the old component molds, smelting furnaces along with the water and air cooling systems and the entire support infrastructure active; engineers, technicians, managers. And they might be busy doing other projects.

If they can replace all of this with a 3D printing system that just requires some geometry data files, a printer and a source of metal, then an engine can be constructed when needed.



posted on Mar, 5 2015 @ 12:58 PM
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originally posted by: IndependentOpinion
never knew that you can use it to print Jet Engines!
I've still seen no evidence that you can. What I see are things that look like Jet engine components, but there's no claim it's actually a jet engine. The woman in the video says testing on a working engine won't begin for another two years.

If you look at a much simpler mechanical object, a 3D printed gun, most of the claims I've seen for those claim they will fire a limited number of shots, but won't be as durable as a normally manufactured gun.

Given the operating temperatures of jet engines, material stresses, and so on, I think making a 3D printed jet engine that is good for anything more than a demonstration test is probably more than 2 years off.



posted on Mar, 5 2015 @ 01:20 PM
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Nanotech and 3-d printing ...wow! With those two technologies, most human caused destruction is a thing of a dark past... imagine dropping a handful of nanobots onto a dump and reaping the renewed resources and cleaned environment (as they could rearrange industrial waste to any other structure)... not to mention feeding the masses and creating any useful object needed... but it would totally rearrange our command structure.. .which is a darned good thing, imo.

The only only part of the equation (besides efficient nano engines ...but soon if not already for those) that is needed is cheap, clean energy...and the fusion field has apparently mostly solved that, too... .and if not, solar would.. .with nanobots scrubbing the industrial waste left by making solar panels.

So, if these techs are let loose into the gen pop... then skies the limit and the future is bright...as long as we can spread out enough so that the loonies infected with religion (or other destructive programming) can't take us all down, that is.



posted on Mar, 5 2015 @ 02:47 PM
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originally posted by: IndependentOpinion
Because this is in the line of my work, someone sent me an email containing this link, and it is real amazing! I had no idea that 3D printing was this advanced! I mean I work with 3D printers, but never knew that you can use it to print Jet Engines!






Working with colleagues from Deakin University and CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation), researchers from Australia's Monash University have created the world's first 3D-printed jet engine. While they were at it, they created the world's second one, too. One of them is currently on display at the International Air Show in Avalon, Australia, while the other can be seen at the headquarters of French aerospace company Microturbo, in Toulouse.

A team from the Monash Centre for Additive Manufacturing and spin-off company Amaero started with an older gas turbine engine contributed by Microturbo (Safran). Still in working order, the small engine was used for auxiliary power in aircraft such as the Falcon 20 business jet.

Led by Prof. Xinhua Wu, the team proceeded to take the engine apart, and scan all the individual components. Using computer models obtained from those scans, a laser was then utilized to selectively melt metal alloy powder, building up two copies of each component in successive layers. When those parts were subsequently assembled, two metal replicas of the original engine were produced.

The project took a year to complete, and received funding from multiple groups including the Australian Research Council. It has reportedly resulted in a number of aerospace companies expressing interest in developing components at the university – using 3D printing, components that previously would have taken months to design and manufacture could be made in weeks.





www.gizmag.com...



How many of you has had the opportunity to work with 3D printers?



That truly is amazing. Soon all the great production lines will use 3D printers instead of the complicated robot processes they use now. An entire car body will be made in one session and in one piece. I never could've imagined this sort of machine myself.



posted on Mar, 5 2015 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

An entire engine yes. Parts on the other hand are in use in actual engines. Rolls Royce is testing an XWB-97 with a 1.5m front bearing housing holding 48 blades.



posted on Mar, 5 2015 @ 10:12 PM
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Wow cool tech.
Nice find.
a reply to: IndependentOpinion



posted on Mar, 5 2015 @ 10:44 PM
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Truly amazing Technology seems to progress by leaps and bounds now.
I have a couple of questions though.
If this process is to ultimately replace manned factories,what will the millions of no longer needed workers do for a living?There has to be some sociologic consequences that will come with this radical new tech.
Please don't get me wrong as i love my tablet and smart TV as much as the next guy.But when they developed the first atomic bomb did they realize that one day there would be enough to destroy the planet 5 times over?
Nanobytes sound amazing.Almost like transforming reality.Could these things also be used for evil purposes?To be used as weapons?



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 01:34 AM
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a reply to: IndependentOpinion
Was @ Avalon trade & airshow last week, spoke to one of the dudes at that stand... the Alalloy stuff is easy enough (which all this engine seemed to be made from) but the high temp Nialloys etc were the issue at the moment.
GTD111 etc melt temp is pretty high.... would require electron beam or suchlike welding within the printer, also the manufacture of many turbine blades use processes of directional solidification (DS) and single crystal (SC) production methods which greatly increase strength against fatigue and creep by aligning grain boundaries in one direction (DS) or by eliminating grain boundaries all together (SC)... so how would printed turbines achieve that?



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 02:11 AM
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a reply to: CovertAgenda

I was involved in the very first 3d printers in UK aerospace industry, back then it was only capable to make a 'wax'.model which would then be covered in ceramic, heated to cook ceramic and melt wax, resulting ceramic mould was filled with moultern metal, lost wax casting.

Couldn't fit them to military aircraft because the repeat ability wasn't as uniform as that from a 'tool' and therefore couldn't be measured.

Also there was never much strength in castings, I hazard a guess sintered metal powder is even less structural.

You needed to forge and machine turbine components.

Perhaps they have replicated parts, but I doubt they would ever meet aerospace quality controls.

They will do one day though!



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 04:02 AM
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originally posted by: Shadow Herder
3d printers will replace factories shortly after china will be eliminated as a place for fabrication. All things will be printed in the future and we will laugh on how backwards we used to do it.




The printers will be made in China, and the designs will be sent back to China via the internet, even as the item is being printed.



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