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Etymology of "God" in Hebrew

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posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 07:02 AM
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I really want to point out that a lot of words nowadays can be very common. For example, Christianity and Islam both use the word "God" in a generic fashion. Now, my knowledge of Hebrew is extremely limited, but I've noticed a few things. Please note that I'm doing a lot of guess-work here.

El and Al both translate to אל and its use is extensive throughout the Semitic languages. I have a funny feeling that its original meaning is The One or The First. Ah may well be an expression, to form something like Oh, God!. I'm also wondering if Allah might translate to The Voice.

Il isn't directly translating into Hebrew but I did notice איל.

The actual Hebrew word for God, literally speaking, seems to be הוהי. I do have to wonder what might be implied by flipping the word around. Sounds blasphemous, right? As it happens, יהוה translates to Jehovah. That's a bit weird, ain't it? If I translate אל יהוה, I get The Lord. Baal, meaning lord or husband, and Moloch which is king, might refer to either somebody holding a position of esteem or a divine entity which is not God, and therefore Jehovah would surely have a similar connotation.

Now let's look at הוה - this translates to Eve, possibly referring to Eve herself or simply before/first. I'm also considering Passion as a possible meaning, which could itself suggest Life. So what happens if we put two together? אלהוה is translating to The Divine. This is very interesting, I must say. These two words look much more natural than anything else I've seen.
 
edit on 3-3-2015 by VigiliaProcuratio because:  




posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 07:20 AM
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"Ehyeh Asher Ehyeh" - I am that I am.

What is He? He is everything.

I bet that if you keep combining those letters, you will get a fair amount of words.



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 07:24 AM
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Interesting. I think that Jehovah is a title myself, that does not mean that the title and god's name aren't the same though.

Al or la kind of means Related to or relationship of. I came across this conclusion when studying ancient languages for a few months. The sounds of old are hard to translate, as they don't seem to follow the principles of our present way of speaking.

I'm not sure if I am right though, but I have somewhat of an inkling from all the research. Ya or Ja seems to be something like a teacher or guide. It's placement within the word dictates something. Ay, would be the student.

My research is from before modern Hebrew though, the old language. A lot of it may be the same. I also did some looking at all the old languages I could get my eyes on. That confused some things but also cleared up some stuff.



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 07:28 AM
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a reply to: VigiliaProcuratio
My understanding is that YHWH is likely to be derived from a verb meaning "to be, or become, or live".
Depending on the unknown vowels, that could give us "the one who lives" or "the one who gives life". From the worshipper's point of view, they go together anyway.






edit on 3-3-2015 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 07:32 AM
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a reply to: Abednego

That's a statement, not his name. I for one do not need to know the name of my maker, but I do have to use some kind of word so as to refer to him. Different deities have different names and this can overlap in places, possibly causing confusion. Whether or not God really does have a name is not relevant.
 
edit on 3-3-2015 by VigiliaProcuratio because:  



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 07:45 AM
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this is useful. click the root word (etymology) link after you get to the page
www.blueletterbible.org...



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 07:51 AM
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originally posted by: VigiliaProcuratio
a reply to: Abednego

That's a statement, not his name. I for one do not need to know the name of my maker, but I do have to use some kind of word so as to refer to him. Different deities have different names and this can overlap in places, possibly causing confusion. Whether or not God really does have a name is not relevant.
 


pretty much all old testament names were titles not proper names. for example, nimrod meant "the rebel", eve meant "the mother of all living" , and every patriarch had a title equivalent to their interaction with god, such as beloved of god. faithful to god, and so on.



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 08:05 AM
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In those days only the High Priest knew the correct spelling of the הוהי or YHVH. If he did spell it wrong, he just die.
So Hebrews substitute the word for Adonai.

Moses ask God His name in order to control it, but God knew what Moses was trying to do. That is why He said "YHVH". That does not necessarily means that Moses would have gain control of God but God play it on his (Moses) terms.
Knowing God's real name was just for invocation not for control.

From Wikipedia: (yeah I know)
According to practices in folklore, knowledge of a true name allows one to affect another person or being magically. It is stated that knowing someone's, or something's, true name therefore gives the person (who knows the true name) power over them.
edit on 3-3-2015 by Abednego because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 08:12 AM
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a reply to: VigiliaProcuratio

El from what I remember ties in with El Shaddai etc most of these words merely mere Lord as in the boss. Where we get into the ideas of Gods is from the old Pantheon which had Yahweh and Molech and a lot of female goddesses in the 12.

I still think that the concept of God comes really from an invisible force that priests used to give qualify themselves with authority and power over the people eg something that could not be proved but sure could frighten those whose ears they pinned back. The only reference to God having been in the planet is in the early biblical one where he went to tea with Abraham or someone, but if you qualify God as the builder/owner of this planet, then he could have given the so called promised land to his so-called chosen and wouldn't have had people living there on that precious land in the first place, they shouldn't have had to steal it by force. Keeping an open mind on what we have been taught by the religiosity it's so mad and unbelievable its amazing people swallowed it for so long.



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 08:13 AM
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originally posted by: Abednego
"Ehyeh Asher Ehyeh" - I am that I am.



hayah asher hayah

ehyeh (ea) and hayah (ea)
edit on 3-3-2015 by undo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 08:15 AM
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you can trace nimrod by reading the story of enmerkar and the lord of arrata. enmerkar is nimrod.

here's a wiki excerpt from an egyptologist who discovered the connection:


David Rohl has claimed parallels between Enmerkar, builder of Uruk, and Nimrod, ruler of biblical Erech (Uruk) and architect of the Tower of Babel in extra-biblical legends. One parallel Rohl noted is the description "Nimrod the Hunter", and the -kar in Enmerkar also meaning "hunter". Rohl has also suggested that Eridu near Ur is the original site of Babel, and that the incomplete ziggurat found there - by far the oldest and largest of its kind - is none other than the remnants of the Biblical tower.[1]


en.wikipedia.org...


edit on 3-3-2015 by undo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 08:43 AM
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originally posted by: Abednego
In those days only the High Priest knew the correct spelling of the הוהי or YHVH. If he did spell it wrong, he just die. So Hebrews substitute the word for Adonai.

Is it me misunderstanding this or what?

Jehovah and Adonai mean the same thing...Lord. No matter the variation, the Hebrew for this is יהוה. This is clearly not referring to God, quite possibly the opposite actually. What's the problem with writing or pronouncing it properly?

Surely this amounts to blasphemy?
 
edit on 3-3-2015 by VigiliaProcuratio because:  



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 09:01 AM
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originally posted by: VigiliaProcuratio

originally posted by: Abednego
In those days only the High Priest knew the correct spelling of the הוהי or YHVH. If he did spell it wrong, he just die. So Hebrews substitute the word for Adonai.

Is it me misunderstanding this or what?

Jehovah and Adonai mean the same thing...Lord. No matter the variation, the Hebrew for this is יהוה. This is clearly not referring to God, quite possibly the opposite actually. What's the problem with writing or pronouncing it properly?

Surely this amounts to blasphemy?
 

We really don't know the correct spelling.

www.logosapostolic.org...



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 09:13 AM
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God is English not Hebrew, and it comes from old Germanic word Gott.

The broken and extended English we use not even spoken in yhe times of the Hebrew bible.

If we.went back in time to say, 500ad, and spoke our English, we would be laughed at and mocked.

But yea, I believe the Hebrew word was EL:

-angEL
-michaEL
-raphaEL
-gabriEL
- EL/lite

This phonetic has been used and mingled in many languages especially spanish. Or in french the use of "Le" which is just backwords


Fun stuff



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 09:26 AM
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originally posted by: Abednego

We really don't know the correct spelling.

Maybe somebody got confused about writing from right-to-left? הוהי certainly translates better. I honestly don't understand what the big deal is all about.



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 09:30 AM
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a reply to: Elementalist
"Elite" doesn't belong on that list, because it doesn't have a Hebrew origin and doesn't have anything to do with God's name.
It is a French word, the slurring of the Latin ELECTUS, and means "chosen".


edit on 3-3-2015 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 10:22 AM
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ehyeh asher ehyeh has that first and last thing going too.
i've always thought the i am phrase indicated that he was a time lord, in the sense that he had mastery over time instead of time having mastery over him. if something is constantly existent, it's eternal.



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 10:46 AM
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moses uses an asherah pole (serpent wrapped pole) in the desert to show where the people could come to receive healing from serpent bites. jesus refers to himself as the serpent raised on the pole by moses, to bring healing to the people (referring to his crucifixion). the asherah pole was like the symbol for medicine and healing - the tree of life, as it were, and also a reference to the serpent in the tree in the garden. what the creation narrative doesn't reveal is every tree mentioned in the garden has a serpent in it, because it's talking about dna and inheritance
clearly what we've been told about the word "serpent" is missing important details.



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 11:42 AM
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originally posted by: Shiloh7
El ... most of these words merely mean Lord

originally posted by: Elementalist
God is English not Hebrew

Yeah, if I translate God to Hebrew then the result seems to relate to Sir (which might as well be Lord). However, הוהי is not English...but maybe Google is translating it to God for obscure reasons.


originally posted by: Shiloh7
something that could not be proved but sure could frighten those whose ears they pinned back.

That is actually precisely what I thought about that Moses quote.

a reply to: undo

Weren't they used by Asher for sacrificial purposes?

a reply to: Shiloh7

There's a possibility that it means Demons or Blood.
 
edit on 3-3-2015 by VigiliaProcuratio because:  



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 12:02 PM
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a reply to: VigiliaProcuratio

according to wiki, he was originally not an actual entity but a deified form of the city of assur. i ran across a similar concept when i realized that enki-ea's e.abzu temple had been deified in the form of abzu, a god, in enuma elish. since the "temple" was the dwelling of the shekinah of god in the old testament, i'm betting "a deified form of the city" is not quite right. more than likely it was a reference to the temple of the city.

the wiki also says that he (asher) absorbed EN.LIL in northern assyria. so the israelites would've thought of asher as being the same as enlil. the problem is, the translation of asher in the verse, is supposedly "that" or a variety of other words, which i think proves that later translators didn't actually understand why jehovah would call himself asher so clearly that word (asher) would have to mean something else.

in effect, the israelites of the time realized enlil was referring to himself in conjunction with enki-ea, meaning he was saying he was the creator, when, if i understand this correctly, enki-ea was the creator.




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