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Contracting Measles and passing it to others after the vaccine. A new case of interest.

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posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 12:14 PM
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In this case we have a little girl in Ontario that came down with symptoms of Measles. Shock, horror. In 1960 there were an estimated 3.5 million cases and 1:100000 died. But I digress. The point is, how did she get it? According to the MMR meme, it's impossible to contract and be contagious after the vaccination. There are those unexplained cases though --so-called atypical measles. In this case the child never traveled outside North America. Odd. So when they swab her to see what virus they actually has, lo and behold, it's the strain that is in the vaccine. This is where the group think goes into hyper drive. Instead of following the evidence, they declare it as one of life's unsolvable mysteries, book closed.

This is medical group think. It is threat to the ideal of science and a threat to your health. The technocrats want you to stop thinking so much. Please. Leave the heavy lifting to them.

The problem of groupthink by technocrats is inevitable really. They need you to capitulate critical thought first and foremost to cement their decision making authority. It's not personal, it's systematic. They will attempt to shame and humiliate you for trying to think on your own. Yet, you are and always will be the number one advocate for your health. It's wrong on multiple levels.

As some of you know, I don't trust pharma profit machines. I don't hate profit itself, I just don't like the outcomes they offer most of the time because they universally include severe trade-offs. The marketing apparatus and technocrat cohort is designed to prevent you the consumer from getting accurate information about those trade-offs and about the big picture of your health.

In this case, at least they did the viral analysis (missing from most outbreaks in the US) but when they found something that doesn't play by the rules of the meme, they immediately self censor. This isn't science.

If you are going to worship technocrats, stay sharp --they lie.


edit on 2-3-2015 by InverseLookingGlass because: made the mistake thread identical to the one I wanted.

edit on 2-3-2015 by InverseLookingGlass because: (no reason given)



(post by GetHyped removed for a manners violation)

posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 12:27 PM
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a reply to: InverseLookingGlass

fat fingered the post before I was finished. Mods can take down--or not.



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 12:30 PM
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a reply to: InverseLookingGlass

Out breaks amongst the vaccinated are not rare and there is plenty of evidence to show that the un-vaccinated are being infected by the vaccinated.


We conclude that outbreaks of measles can occur in secondary schools, even when more than 99 percent of the students have been vaccinated and more than 95 percent are immune. (N Engl J Med 1987; 316:771–4.)

www.nejm.org...


+4 more 
posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 12:34 PM
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originally posted by: GetHyped
a reply to: InverseLookingGlass

Your rants are getting more and more bizarre. I sincerely think you need help.


I do need help. Can you help me understand the benefits of the Hep B vaccine for a neonate?



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 12:46 PM
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originally posted by: GetHyped
a reply to: InverseLookingGlass

Your rants are getting more and more bizarre. I sincerely think you need help.


I understand what ILG's saying and certainly the communication of a vaccine based strain of a disease is cause for concern, especially when it's "glossed over." What's the tipping point where it becomes of concern? 10 people, a thousand, a million? If it happens once, there is a reasonable probability it will happen again. It makes you wonder if people who don't get vaccinated are targets for engineered infection, trial run maybe? Paranoid as that sounds, it is not inconceivable. A second point is the veracity of denial in situations like these, it does tend to look like "group think" at work trying to maintain a potentially failed ideology.

Big pharma is filled with problems, that's what happens when it comes down to greed/profits over their Hippocratic oath (and the "do no harm"). All of their meds are poisons in one form/strength or another and they pretty much all have side effects, generally requiring the use of other meds to soften the initial side effects but at the same time producing others. Providing quality of life/real health and generating profits have the distinct appearance of being polar opposites when it comes to the Pfizers and GSK's, etc. of this world.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 01:00 PM
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a reply to: InverseLookingGlass

Thanks for posting -- this needs to be known. Believing otherwise creates a false sense of security, which causes its own problems. And that's just one of many problems caused by glossing over facts, no matter how good one's intentions may be.



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 01:06 PM
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originally posted by: bobs_uruncle

originally posted by: GetHyped
a reply to: InverseLookingGlass

Your rants are getting more and more bizarre. I sincerely think you need help.


I understand what ILG's saying and certainly the communication of a vaccine based strain of a disease is cause for concern, especially when it's "glossed over." What's the tipping point where it becomes of concern? 10 people, a thousand, a million? If it happens once, there is a reasonable probability it will happen again. It makes you wonder if people who don't get vaccinated are targets for engineered infection, trial run maybe? Paranoid as that sounds, it is not inconceivable. A second point is the veracity of denial in situations like these, it does tend to look like "group think" at work trying to maintain a potentially failed ideology.


The tipping point isn't a singular number. The tipping point would be a percentage of a population in an area.


Big pharma is filled with problems, that's what happens when it comes down to greed/profits over their Hippocratic oath (and the "do no harm"). All of their meds are poisons in one form/strength or another and they pretty much all have side effects, generally requiring the use of other meds to soften the initial side effects but at the same time producing others. Providing quality of life/real health and generating profits have the distinct appearance of being polar opposites when it comes to the Pfizers and GSK's, etc. of this world.

Cheers - Dave


Eh... All things you put into your body have side effects



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 01:12 PM
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I believe that some vaccines are a good thing to have, but I do not think Measles is actually that bad a disease to warrant the side effects of the vaccine. For many the Flu shot causes serious problems too.

We evolved with the Measles, there may be some good out of catching this disease that we aren't comprehending. The measles have probably been around for thousands of years. But, what do I know, I do not derive my income from administering vaccines nor do I own any stock in Pharma companies. If I did, I might have a different belief in the necessity of these things.

If you keep looking at the bad in viruses and diseases all the time you might miss some good properties. I'm sure there is some good we receive from catching the measles when we are young.
edit on 2-3-2015 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 01:56 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse




I'm sure there is some good we receive from catching the measles when we are young.I'm sure there is some good we receive from catching the measles when we are young.


I came across this the other day and it's probably the best articulation of the medical case for a cautious approach to vaccines.

Inform yourself. Find and read the vaccine package inserts at www.nvic.org



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 03:52 PM
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originally posted by: InverseLookingGlass
a reply to: rickymouse




I'm sure there is some good we receive from catching the measles when we are young.I'm sure there is some good we receive from catching the measles when we are young.


I came across this the other day and it's probably the best articulation of the medical case for a cautious approach to vaccines.

Inform yourself. Find and read the vaccine package inserts at www.nvic.org


What I find quite bizarre is that you don't trust pharma but you do trust their package inserts.
Cherry picking much?

And then you trust someone (Moskowitz) who sells magic water and bases his "articulation" on spurious papers from 2 or more decades ago (look at the dates on the references at the bottom of the page).
And you wish to be taken seriously?

This is scraping the barrel even for you.



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 04:15 PM
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originally posted by: InverseLookingGlass

originally posted by: GetHyped
a reply to: InverseLookingGlass

Your rants are getting more and more bizarre. I sincerely think you need help.


I do need help. Can you help me understand the benefits of the Hep B vaccine for a neonate?


Since you asked so nicely here's an explanation for you.
shotofprevention.com...



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 05:15 PM
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a reply to: Pardon?

Prevention is the key word in that opinion piece. Some of us would prefer a less intrusive means of prevention. Prevention that carries serious side effects per the Hep B insert seems a lazy an uninformed means of protection.

How an infant would contract Hep B before the age of seven (hep B vaccine only protects for seven years) would require a most unhealthy life style that includes unprotected and irresponsible sex, intravenous drug use and surrounding yourself and your baby with other drug and sex addicts. I know many young families that lead holistic and positive lives and are teaching the same to their children. The Hep B vaccine is a case of one size not fitting all. A healthy life style is the best protection one can have.

An infants' liver is not mature for about three weeks after birth, even in the healthiest of babies. If medicine was as responsible as they would like us to believe they would at least wait until an infants organs were fully operational.



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: InverseLookingGlass

I don't always agree with you, but this post is spot on. Unfortunately many here are so overwhelmed by their religion of science they stopped asking questions. Anything that is manipulated by money is corrupt and lies naturally follow.



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 06:49 PM
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a reply to: InverseLookingGlass

That is a very good article. You know, I have known from the time I was 18 that I could not take a flu shot because of the severe reaction to it. I didn't know much about vaccinations all along, believing they knew what they were talking about. Then I started researching how they work and complications of the vaccines, from the sites that actually produced the vaccines and medical sites. I discovered discrepancies, misconceptions, and ignorance of reporting actual reactions by the doctors. The doctors would think the people didn't have the disease because they were vaccinated and then treat them for something else, usually administering antibiotics. This showed me that much of the evidence as to their effectiveness could be flawed because the doctors beliefs overpowered their diagnosis a lot of times. Beliefs created by the people selling the vaccinations and medicines.

I'm glad that I quit my quest to become a doctor. I would have had my license taken away for not playing ball within five years. The doctors do not have the time to research this stuff, so they believe what they are told by those who run the show.



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 09:30 PM
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a reply to: InverseLookingGlass
Your subject is "Contracting Measles and passing it on to others after the vaccine. A new case of interest."

But your source's headline is, "Mystery solved: Northern Ontario toddler didn't have measles, health unit says."

A conundrum! Did someone contract measles from the vaccine, and then pass it on to someone else, or not? The source goes on to quote a Dr. Sutcliffe: "She had a rash and some of the symptoms -- not exactly typical of measles -- but did have symptoms of measles."

So she didn't have all of the symptoms of measles, or typical symptoms of measles. She just had some of the symptoms of measles. OP assumes it actually was measles. Sutcliffe hypothesizes that the child cleared the vaccine measles strain she was exposed to last fall, and was re-exposed by shedding children in day care. OP assumes that hypothesis is correct. So Sutcliffe is ignored when she says it wasn't measles, but her word is taken as gospel when she advances a speculative hypothesis, as long as it supports OP's theory.

As for someone contracting measles from the vaccine then passing it on to someone else, that appears to have been invented. None of the child's contacts are reported to have measles, or the mystery disease that mimics some (but not all) of the symptoms of measles. Nor is it reported that the child passed this diseases that mimics some (but not all) of the symptoms of measles to anyone else.



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 12:31 AM
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I have heard of cases where children have gotten a form of measles from their vaccine. In those cases, the doctors have said that it is not contagious. I've also heard others say that their doctors told them to avoid being around immune-compromised people in the 2-3 weeks following vaccination.
Is this true? I don't know. But it is the reason I have to talk to a doctor before my child gets their MMRV. I'm one of those rare people who have contracted chickenpox several times and I have to make sure that I won't be exposed before testing to see if I'm immune or not. I imagine the risk is extremely low to none, but would rather be safe than sorry.



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 02:48 AM
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originally posted by: Witness2008
a reply to: Pardon?

Prevention is the key word in that opinion piece. Some of us would prefer a less intrusive means of prevention. Prevention that carries serious side effects per the Hep B insert seems a lazy an uninformed means of protection.

How an infant would contract Hep B before the age of seven (hep B vaccine only protects for seven years) would require a most unhealthy life style that includes unprotected and irresponsible sex, intravenous drug use and surrounding yourself and your baby with other drug and sex addicts. I know many young families that lead holistic and positive lives and are teaching the same to their children. The Hep B vaccine is a case of one size not fitting all. A healthy life style is the best protection one can have.

An infants' liver is not mature for about three weeks after birth, even in the healthiest of babies. If medicine was as responsible as they would like us to believe they would at least wait until an infants organs were fully operational.


Prevention is indeed the key.
But to fully prevent it you must ensure that every single person who the baby ever comes into contact is not a Hep B carrier.
Can you do that?
Will you take a mobile lab out with you and test everyone who comes near the child?
That includes children of infected parent(s), the parents of who may not know they're infected. Health-care workers, teachers etc etc etc.
The virus can remain outside of the body for 7 days, so are you going to wipe everywhere the child plays with an anti-viral compound?
No.
Didn't think so.
So regardless of these parents leading "holistic and positive lives" (whatever the .... that means) you would need to ensure that everyone else surrounding the baby is too.



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 05:43 AM
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a reply to: InverseLookingGlass

Thanks for the info...



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 05:48 AM
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a reply to: InverseLookingGlass


I think there are over twenty types of meales. The vacinne protects against one type.

purp..



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