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Borrowing from the Future. The great flaw?

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posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 01:39 PM
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a reply to: asmall89

Great tunes you got there on your Sound Cloud, my favorites are :
-Epic Journey
-Longing
-Journey through the Desert
-Queen of Air and Darkness

I would of liked "La Morte d'Arthur" but I don't like the sound banks used...which by the way, if it's meant to be in French, would be named "La Mort d'Arthur". I'm not the biggest classical fan out there, I mostly enjoy movie and video game music when it comes to classical but I really saw the potential of those songs becoming soundtracks that really set the mood.




posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 02:38 PM
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a reply to: asmall89

Ideally in creative endeavors I dont see why we would not be aiming for the heights of quality and quantity. That being said, creative endeavors are not always easy and automatic. I suppose he desires you to be able to churn out a lot of quantity first, be able to just compose and compose music, and in doing so, build up your craft and skills so that you can increase the standard of your quality as well.

Also, I would love to hear your compositions, is there any where online we can listen?

You are aware of the instruments which exist. You are aware of the notes which exist. I think your professor expects you, as a painter has their canvas and palate, to just be able to sit down with your mediums and tools and even if uninspired, to be able to create a piece of music of quantity and quality. I love music, its my greatest passion



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: theMediator

I never doubted his ability. Just his work ethic.
Nice that he has a bum chum defending him.



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 03:17 PM
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originally posted by: asmall89
a reply to: Psynic

A director? Who's employed by a production company.



That's who you may think you'd be working for.

Think harder.



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 04:45 PM
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originally posted by: ImaFungi
Also, I would love to hear your compositions, is there any where online we can listen?


He's got a Sound Cloud link in his signature.



originally posted by: Gideon70
Nice that he has a bum chum defending him.


Actually I never heard of him before this thread hehe

But I never agreed with people that say ridiculous things like "Success is 1% talent and 99% hard work". That's just an excuse for successful people say instead of just admiting that somewhere, they got lucky.
edit on 2-3-2015 by theMediator because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 05:48 PM
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a reply to: theMediator

Thanks! I appreciate your input, I'm listening to your work as we speak. Yeah La Mort was one of the first I used with that sound bank... I wish I could go in and rework it but the file's a mess I'll eventually probably just reuse the ideas for smaller works. I'll have to PM you because I have some questions about your work.

a reply to: ImaFungi

I agree with you're analysis. I understand that as one gets comfortable writing large quantities quality will eventually follow. However at this point I'm finding it difficult, I suppose I should have separated this thread into two separate issues.






edit on 2-3-2015 by asmall89 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 06:08 PM
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originally posted by: Gideon70
I think the OP is just being plain lazy.

I think the OP thinks he is so talented that all he has to do is compose a piece with no theory or written documentation and then tries to justify his laziness by comparing his situation to that of the economic collapses of past Empires.

I see through the OP and so does his tutor.

success is 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration .


That is not the point of my post. I'm saying that the push for quantity and borrowing from our future is destroying the world.

I merely used my story as a way to show how I came up with my thesis. Poor choice? Perhaps. Was I venting my frustration? Yes.

I know my stuff and have more to learn but thus far I am not seeing my investments worth. Not because what he said to me either. Right now as it sits I haven't learned anything additional to what my previous instructor taught me. Or rather, anything with real world value.



originally posted by: Psynic

originally posted by: asmall89
a reply to: Psynic

A director? Who's employed by a production company.



That's who you may think you'd be working for.

Think harder.





Well I suppose the government has a hand in Hollywood to an extent.
edit on 2-3-2015 by asmall89 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 07:22 PM
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a reply to: asmall89

Also I dont know if using Mozart is a good idea for your argument, because while yes he did get a major head start learning when he was super young (I dont like to listen to his way early music any way) he did only live till the age of 35 and the amount of music he produced quantity and quality wise is unfathomable, I can say an impressive 41 symphonies would be amazing enough, but then must mention literally hundreds of other works, multiple operas, over 20 piano concertos, volumes of chamber music, etc. etc.



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 09:35 PM
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a reply to: ImaFungi

In fact there was so much that maybe he had ghost writers for a couple parts, some instruments here and there...I bet a lot of people at the time would of been trilled to co-work with someone like Mozart



posted on Mar, 2 2015 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: asmall89

You made some great points right on the money, borrowing from the future is an interesting one, which might be the big flaw. The future is undetermined, what you have now is enslaving the young, by permanent debt . Now its fairly obvious, buying a house is a pipe dream for many . They are staying at home in droves. The speculation , causing inflation on house prices, is giving the illusion of wealth to a few, but stagnant wages, is just going to stop the housing market. That will cause the next crash in property prices as, these assets are gained by a small percentage to the landlord, so he can pay debt, and the percentage to the bank on the loan, leaving the renters to cough up the rest in a stagnant wage economy. Their comes a point where in a stagnant wage economy the rent cant pay the debt, to the bank.



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 07:20 AM
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edit on -06:0017153232015-03-03T07:23:17-06:00 by Psynic because: Why bother. Lazy and dull.



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 07:55 AM
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Possibly, is there any evidence of that? I am pretty sure it was just that composing was all he did all day everyday. I cant find where I had read it but i do recall reading that sometimes he would never even leave his bed for spells of time, his wife would bring his materials on a tray to his bed and he would just compose there.

Just scroll down this list and understand that all of these works aesthetically are prime expressions of enjoyable music, all of them quality; en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 09:55 PM
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a reply to: ImaFungi

True what Mozart accomplished is great, however most of his work which are considered masterworks are his later compositions. Perhaps quality is not the right word, personal expression or creative innovation may be better. Mozart made his money by performing on piano and writing operas and had tight deadlines to meet. Beethoven on the other hand was on a pension and had the freedom to explore personal expression through music. I don't know, people work differently. Mozart's ability came very naturally, Beethoven had to work harder at it.

a reply to: theMediator

Exactly. A lot of composers had assistants. I'm not sure about Mozart but Bach did and in fact some of Bach's work may not be by him. In the case of Mozart his last work the Requiem was finished by someone else.



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 10:01 PM
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originally posted by: anonentity
a reply to: asmall89

You made some great points right on the money, borrowing from the future is an interesting one, which might be the big flaw. The future is undetermined, what you have now is enslaving the young, by permanent debt . Now its fairly obvious, buying a house is a pipe dream for many . They are staying at home in droves. The speculation , causing inflation on house prices, is giving the illusion of wealth to a few, but stagnant wages, is just going to stop the housing market. That will cause the next crash in property prices as, these assets are gained by a small percentage to the landlord, so he can pay debt, and the percentage to the bank on the loan, leaving the renters to cough up the rest in a stagnant wage economy. Their comes a point where in a stagnant wage economy the rent cant pay the debt, to the bank.


Your 100% right. There has been tremendous inflation in the past 40 years or so due to the easy money policies. Where we see it is in housing, tuition, medical expenses, stocks, vehicles, etc. Basically the things you finance.
I talk to my parents about these issues constantly but I feel they don't grasp the situation here. Since they have seen stock market crashes before they think there is nothing to be concerned about, that stocks in the long haul pay off. That debt pays off...



posted on Mar, 3 2015 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: asmall89

Western society is run by western private central bankers

Who use the United States to enforce their power and control

Any questions ?



posted on Mar, 4 2015 @ 01:46 AM
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I'm not a musical person, but I think I understand where your professor is coming from. In my computer programming classes for example every quiz and every test requires writing computer code... with a pen and paper. Every mistake I make, a spacing error in a line, a syntax error, a missing character marks the entire question as wrong. There's usually 3 questions on a test, so the slightest error drops the maximum grade you can get on that test from a 100% to a 67%, an A to a D. There is no curve in these classes.

My 3d art classes were similar. Before I was allowed to 3d model I had to spend years building sculptures first. For every object I wanted to create digitally, I had to physically build it with my hands.

This is a pretty common thing in just about every field. Professors do it because they're trying to make certain things become second nature to you. It's one thing to teach the theory but it's another to essentially give you the muscle memory so that you don't even have to think about 95% of what you're creating. That's likely the idea behind what your professor is doing. By writing things out, you have to do it all. You are aware of every component that is going into your work, thus you become aware of what the computer is later doing for you... and what it's not doing for you.


Other than that, I agree about growth policies. The underlying issue is that our economic system is based on growth. Not sustainability or profitability, but growth. Unlimited growth is unsustainable and that means a crash is inevitable.



posted on Mar, 5 2015 @ 01:18 PM
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he hates the idea of using a computer to compose


Not saying to go all-out dubstep on him (progressive house with orchestral elements should be enough), but one day you should write a score that specifically uses various filters and FX and go crazy in the score annotations (or perhaps overwrite some empty bars with curves indicating various FX levels) to produce the desired timbre and quality. (Thinking cutoffs/res and other distortions here.) Maybe annotate using something like a sidechain to duck out a chord progression so it builds on the rythm and not just harmony. Some things just can't be played straight-up on a piano or conventional instruments without post-processing.

Might be a little harder to write a contemporary score with classical notation, but no reason why it can't be done.

If it actually sounds really good on the computer, but he can't play it, it'd be fun to drive him a bit nuts.



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