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If You Could...Would You?

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posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 07:13 AM
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No way in hell would I give up the chance to have kids. Kinda selfish isnt it? How bout this......Would you die tomorrow so your children can live 1000 years?




posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 07:16 AM
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a reply to: MysterX

Are you familiar with the Q from Star Trek? There was an episode that comes to mind when one of the Q wanted to commit suicide. I believe there are two quotes that are relavent to this discussion.


Quinn: In a way, our vulnerability is what this is all about. As the Q have evolved, we've sacrificed many things along the way, not just manners, but mortality and a sense of purpose and a desire for change and a capacity to grow. Each loss is a new vulnerability, wouldn't you say?



Quinn: At the beginning of the new era, life as a Q was a constant dialogue of discovery and issues and humor from all over the universe. But look at them now, listen to their dialogue now.

Lieutenant Tuvok: I'm afraid I cannot hear any.

Quinn: Because it has all been said. Everyone has heard everything, seen everything; they haven't had to speak to each other in ten millennia. There's nothing left to say.


Star Trek Voyager: Death Wish Quotes


Immortality might be great for awhile. But like the quotes show, eventually man will experience everything. Man will say all there is to say and do all there is to do. There will be nothing left and an existence void of anything new to experience. The final experience, would be that of death.

As Peter Pan said, "To die would be a great adventure."
edit on 2/28/2015 by EternalSolace because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 07:19 AM
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originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: MysterX

OP, let's add another sore-point equation into your factors of wanting immortality.
You want to work forever? Do you have the mistaken idea that you can work for a few decades and then kick back and live forever on your retirement? Not likely. Seems like a major adjustment is required with that scene. Plus, deathlessness if fully extend to all humans means that the population of the earth would, of course, explode over its traditional manner of increases.

Death is necessary for you, me and everybody else to appreciate life. Eliminate the inevitable and you would have Hell on earth in short order.


But you're missing a few fundamental points in this hypothetical question.

There would be no population explosion...with those opting for a greatly extended lifespan, perhaps a lifespan of thousands of years, there would be no children born to them, there would be no conventional family unit as we have now.

The work thing was already addressed too...the machines based on advanced nanotechnology would perform the majority of the manual work...whereas the immortal would apply themselves working towards a goal of personal discovery and advancement, not personal avarice or resource accumulation.

Art, culture, science, discovery would be enhanced to the point of being unrecognisable, our 'worker ant' paradigm would be a thing of the past to be scoffed at as backwards way of life.

Utopia would be the word to describe our existence...we would have enough time to do, go or achieve anything we could imagine and that which we cannot yet imagine.



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 07:20 AM
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originally posted by: AMERICANCER
No way in hell would I give up the chance to have kids. Kinda selfish isnt it? How bout this......Would you die tomorrow so your children can live 1000 years?


Yes, yes i feel i would.

Ideally, i'd like to be right there alongside them in a 1000 years time...but if it meant they could live for as long as they wanted to...yes, i would volunteer to go.



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 07:27 AM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

Thinking logically, those star trek writers wrote from a perspective where such things do not exist, and so had no choice but to apply to their scripts the limitations and experience of life that they know of only as mortal creatures...just as we're doing here.

Also logically, if an immortal species, such as the Q had indeed done everything, said and thought everything and there was nothing left to experience or say or do...being bored to the point of extreme apathy...is an experience in and of itself, so they were continuing to experience...but they experienced apathy.

I'd imagine there would be distinct cycles in an immortal lifespan where anything and everything could be experienced, cycles that would include euphoria, bliss, discovery, apathy, boredom, optimism, pessimism, love, hate, and so on...in a life where everything will be experienced, boredom and apathy would be as welcome an emotion and state of mind as euphoria and love, and no less of an experience either.



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 07:27 AM
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a reply to: MysterX

I feel exactly the same way you do. However, it future medical technological advances also provided me with a way to freeze eggs/sperm throughout my extra long life, then I could theoretically start a family any time I wished. So I could have it both ways. I then would opt to prolong my life further because there is so much to learn, see and do in this existence and I feel as if I just skimmed the surface.



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 07:30 AM
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a reply to: MysterX

Is eternal apathy an experience that's worth immortality?



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 07:31 AM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

Cycles are cyclic, so the apathy would not be eternal, only temporary...besides, in theory any immortal could check out anytime they had truly had enough of everything...suicide would always be an option, as would accidental death among other ways to end our immortal existence.





edit on 28-2-2015 by MysterX because: added text



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 07:36 AM
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a reply to: MysterX

Would it really be cyclic though? In a life where everything has been experienced 1000 times over, there is nothing new. I mean, sure you could switch from euphoria, to bliss, to whatever. But after it's been done time and time again... I'm having a hard time seeing how anything but apathy would remain in an immortal life.

True, that opting out would always be an option. But what is the point of immortality if one can always opt out regardless?

It seems like a blessing that's also a curse.
edit on 2/28/2015 by EternalSolace because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 07:56 AM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

But really that's like asking the ultimate question isn't it?

The question being...'what is the point of life and living?'

That fundamental question applies whether we live for 30 years and then cease to exist, or whether we live for 30,000 years and then cease to exist...it's the same thing ultimately when you think about it, regardless of how long or short our lives are.

What if the point of life was similar in nature to an internet bot trawling the WWW in order to gather information and then return that information to the programmer?

What if what people think of as 'god' (or gods in certain religions) is akin to the programmer and we all of us are as the bots?

Wouldn't then it become clear that the point of our lives are to gather information to convey to the programmer?

That information could be literally specific information, or could be experiential information...experiences and feelings, emotions, thoughts and imaginings that will be gathered during every second of a conscious and unconscious existence and then 'uploaded' to the programmer directly when our bodies fail...if that was actually the case, wouldn't it then be a positive to live for a greatly extended period in order to gather much, much richer and significantly greater volumes of information to ultimately upload to the programmer?



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 08:27 AM
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originally posted by: MysterX

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: MysterX



The lesson we are supposed to learn here is the flesh is weak. Its only a vessel.





Yes, but only today.

Tomorrow, it may be quite, quite different.


A hospice nurse once said, "Everyone is meant to grow old, get sick and die… sorry about that."



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 08:51 AM
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a reply to: MysterX

The idea of immortality with people the way they are, living in a world that sense the beginning we have made NO effort to stop killing each other, frankly makes me sick to my stomach.

As far as being sterile, we should have done that long ago. IMO


edit on 28-2-2015 by Battleline because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 09:02 AM
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Absolutely not!!!! Why would a magnificent soul want to be stuck on one little planet, for a thousand years in a crummy little physical body, when the whole universe is out there waiting to be explored?

Why do we even allow ourselves to be trapped here anyway?

NO, NO, NO!!!! What a horrible thought!
edit on 28-2-2015 by took red pill because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 09:55 AM
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On earth as it is now no way. To many souls annoying me with subjective faith causing dualities hate instead of objective spiritual seeking based on experience. And a history created by narcissistic people holding humanity back collectively thru mind control curse.

Earth is a bad neighborhood compared to some other spiritual neighborhoods. Why be human forever when you can be "Q"-like forever with spirits that are pure joy to be around?


edit on 28-2-2015 by LittleByLittle because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 10:19 AM
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Life is overrated. I don't want to be a parent, and wouldn't want to live that long. Humanity is devolving and things are getting worse anyway, so i can't even imagine how bad it would be few decades from know, let alone centuries.



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 01:04 PM
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a reply to: MysterX

Yes. I would trade all that you listed for immortality, with the caveat that I would have good health and the most my body would age would be mid 40's.



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 01:27 PM
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a reply to: MysterX

I'm already immortal, in my own mind. Think about that one for awhile
and know that to think long, won't be wrong.



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 01:51 PM
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Longer life?
HERE?
HELL no.



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 03:08 PM
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a reply to: MysterX

Family means different things to different people, I would personally trade the prospect of having children for immortality in a heartbeat.

Kids are people's way of obtaining immortality, but if you are truly immortal you wouldn't really need them.

I think that you would become super paranoid at some point because you could still physically be killed by accidents etc.

I think the only way immortality would be sustainable over a long period would be if you became physically tougher/stronger. Otherwise the paranoia would kick in to the point where you'd never leave the house for fear of dying. Especially if you'd already lived for 200 years or so and built up a huge estate or something,



posted on Feb, 28 2015 @ 03:27 PM
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Interesting responses so far, and the majority are running in the direction I'd expect, but for a reason I'd not even thought about. I'm amazed at how many people seem to be miserable on Earth in 2015... don't quite get that, or at least I don't quite get why more folks haven't changed their situations in life. The planet is large and there is beauty found everywhere on it, you just sometimes have to acknowledge that where you presently are isn't a beautiful place to you and make the difficult decision of moving to where you want to be.

Anyway, to the OP, no. I have children and I wouldn't trade them for anything, including immortality. I'm not sure there's ever been a time in my life when my answer would have been any different. Until I sired kids, I believed myself to be immortal (obviously not literally, but like many young men I always had a chip on my shoulder and figured I'd never slow down, never surrender.) so the idea of trading anything for immortality back then would have seemed like a needless exchange. Once I held my first born, I realized I was holding my immortality right there in my arms. The same feeling was had when my daughter was born. I hope to have more children and hope to have many grandchildren and great-grandchildren, because they are the physical manifestaton of a man's immortality. So long as my blood walks this Earth, I can never truly die in the physical sense.




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