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Why Did The U.S. Keep The Names Of The 13 British Colonies?

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posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 07:49 AM
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When the U.S. became independent from Britain, one would have thought they may have changed the names of The 13 colonies; as the new founded country was making a fresh start. The names of the colonies where given by The British.

Countries such as Rhodesia, Ceylon ,Honduras,Guiana etc all changed their name once they became independent from Britain. The 13 colonies never did.

Any thoughts on why not ?




posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 07:50 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong

Some of the names predate the British.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 07:53 AM
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I'd guess it's because they hated the British establishment rather than Britain itself...


& what Augustus said!




posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 07:55 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: alldaylong

Some of the names predate the British.



Which ones are those ?



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 07:56 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong
I think the historical answer is that most of the thirteen colonies were not founded and named by the British government.
The founders were private individuals and companies, usually acting under licence from the government of the day.
So the colonies identified more with their founders and with the names which had been given by them than the African colonies did, where the names were more obviously imposed from outside.





edit on 27-2-2015 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 07:57 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong

Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Delaware.

Three were Native American place-names and the other was Dutch.

There are more that came after the 13 original colonies that have similarities.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 07:58 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus
Pennsylvania was surely named after William Penn?



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:01 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus
Isn't Pennsylvania named after a British admiral?

Darn too slow - what Disraeli said.


edit on 27-2-2015 by ScepticScot because: other poster more knowledgeable



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:01 AM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

Yep. By Charles II.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:02 AM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus
Pennsylvania was surely named after William Penn?



You are correct. It was.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:02 AM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
Pennsylvania was surely named after William Penn?


Certainly. It was also part of Delaware originally.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:07 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus
And what did Delaware, boy?
She wore a brand New Jersey, that's what she did wear.
(giving away age)



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:08 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: alldaylong

Connecticut, Pennsylvania Massachusetts and Delaware.

Three were Native American place-names and the other was Dutch.

There are more that came after the 13 original colonies that have similarities.



Just doing some research. Delaware was named after The Delaware River.

The Delaware River was named by Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr. ( 1577-1618)

You can knock that and Pennsylvania off your list.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:09 AM
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originally posted by: ScepticScot
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus
Isn't Pennsylvania named after a British admiral?



William Penn's father was a British Admiral, Admiral Sir William Penn, British naval officer and member of the House of Commons. The land was given to William Penn (the son) to satisfy a debt owed his father (who'd been dead 11 years by that time) by Charles II.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:10 AM
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a reply to: CharlieSpeirs
This I think is correct. The revolution was against the government of time. Not against the crown / country. Weren't quite a few on the revolutionary side monarchists?



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:56 AM
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Just done a little more research.

Oregon was named after British Major Robert Rogers

On a side note i have found that Hawaii has an official language of English and Hawaiian. The U.S. as a whole has no official language.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 09:04 AM
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originally posted by: alldaylong

The Delaware River was named by Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr. ( 1577-1618)


Which is named after the Delaware tribe.


You can knock that and Pennsylvania off your list.


Sure.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 09:09 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: alldaylong

The Delaware River was named by Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr. ( 1577-1618)


Which is named after the Delaware tribe.


You can knock that and Pennsylvania off your list.


Sure.


What are the chances of that then?

The Delaware Tribe having a name similar to Baron De La Warr.

I think not.

en.wikipedia.org...


edit on 27-2-2015 by alldaylong because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 09:19 AM
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originally posted by: alldaylong
When the U.S. became independent from Britain, one would have thought they may have changed the names of The 13 colonies; as the new founded country was making a fresh start. The names of the colonies where given by The British.

Countries such as Rhodesia, Ceylon ,Honduras,Guiana etc all changed their name once they became independent from Britain. The 13 colonies never did.

Any thoughts on why not ?


Because the colonists were British. They waged the revolutionary war only reluctantly. Only 1/3 of the population fought and they only did so after seeking every peaceful means to reduce the king's oppressive taxes and earn equal representation in his government. While they did end up fighting and earned their freedom that didn't change who they were or where they came from. It just meant they didn't need to answer to king George anymore.

It's hard to say why those other countries changed their name. I suspect maybe the native populations had more say in the new government? During the formation of the United States the natives weren't treated very well.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 09:28 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong

I stand corrected.




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