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What Colour Is This Dress, ATS??? Genuine Social Experiment... Or Ultimate Troll Experiment???

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posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 10:21 PM
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a reply to: kosmicjack

Apply this same perception dispute to the UFO forum....

lol how hilarious would that be if it was the crux of the issue.




posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 10:23 PM
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a reply to: Doodle19815

But again I ask, how can two people staring at the same screen, at the same time, see two different dresses?

Indeed. That's where my ophthalmologist comment comes in hehehe.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 10:23 PM
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a reply to: Doodle19815 LCD displays especially laptop screens when viewed at an angle and not directly on, appear to enhance color saturation, and change the ultimate appearance of color.. for example sitting in front of my screen something appears to be gold... at an angle, viewing from over my shoulder say, would alter the color perceived to be dark even black, due to angle of view on the screen. also true with phones and tablets


edit on 26-2-2015 by CaDreamer because: grammar



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 10:29 PM
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Originally I shared that it looked white/gold.

I see blue/ nearly black after I do this: I went to this article on ithere scrolled up and then down focusing on the blue/black and then to the white/black store images of the dress. When I scrolled back to the photo of the dress it appear blue, with almost black lacing. It appeared the same on the thread OP post for a while too and still does for a while after observing the images again.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 10:29 PM
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Here's an explanation for those who are interested:


Your retina is comprised of rods and cones. Rods are more sensitive to light, but see shapes and not color. Cones are sensitive to color, but less sensitive to light — i.e. in darker conditions, you're seeing more with rods than cones. You have three sizes of cones, blue (smallest) to red (biggest), as seen on the graph above.

Whether the dress appears as blue/black or white/gold depends on whether your eye has more rods or cones, and also the ambient lighting conditions in the room. (This is thanks to the different colors that are produced by additive and subtractive color mixing.) Different people have different balances of rods and cones — most notably color-blind weirdos like myself — hence different people seeing different colors, and families brutally murdering each other over this mess.

But rods are also very sensitive to light. Rod cells detect color using a pigment called rhodopsin, which is very sensitive to low light, but is bleached and destroyed by higher light levels, and takes around 45 minutes to redevelop (why your eyes take time to adapt to night, in other words). Basically, if you look at the dress in bright light conditions, then go away for half an hour into a dark room and come back, the dress will quite probably change color.

Moreso than anything else, though, this probably has to do with individual differences in color perception. If you've ever dabbled with photography, you've probably come across white balance — the camera trying to correct for the chromatic bias of the current lighting conditions. Your brain does its own white balancing automatically, meaning that you're either ignoring the blue hue, giving a white/gold image, or ignoring the yellow hue, giving a blue/black photo.

To wrap up the non-science side of things: according to Tumblr, the original dress is actually blue and black. But don't beat yourself up if you're seeing white and gold: a color-picker investigation shows the colors, more or less, to be a pale blue and a muddy gold.


goo.gl...
edit on 26-2-2015 by daaskapital because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 10:29 PM
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Agreed.




posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 10:31 PM
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a reply to: CaDreamer

Hmm.... if you say so.

However, I am disagreeing with the screen tilt theory. I have seen it elsewhere also. I can see both views staring straight on ahead. And besides my children held my phone, looked directly at it, at seperate times, and they also came up with different colors, so.....



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 10:31 PM
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a reply to: ChaoticOrder

Averages are not good when you have multiple populations, see the link on amazon the top is transparent, the darker lines are not.

Average the color of asians, whites, blacks and get the average color of each population, average all together and you will get something as that brown color, but you will never see a real people of that color

www.wired.com...

www.buzzfeed.com...

Seems to me blue/black is wining




At least we can all agree on one thing: The people who see the dress as white are utterly, completely wrong.

edit on 26-2-2015 by Indigent because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 10:34 PM
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a reply to: daaskapital

Well that explains why my first color shift happened after exiting a dark room!



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 10:45 PM
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I think the answer is they are perfect compliment colors. That will play with the brain.
The color is blue/violet and gold/ orange. They cancel each other out. Some people see the gold and white and some the blue black. It is the way the brain fools us.
edit on 26-2-2015 by d8track because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 10:47 PM
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I see blue and brownish gold.

Here, have fun with this link



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 10:51 PM
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a reply to: Indigent

Whether you want to call it gold, bronze, or brown, it certainly isn't black.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 10:52 PM
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originally posted by: buni11687
Agreed.



Hahaha, good stuff.


BUT, Helen Keller is wrong! (at least right now, cause I can no longer see that dammed dress as blue and black!!)



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 10:54 PM
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a reply to: daaskapital

I think it has more to do with how the brain interprets colors rather than the number of rods and cones in a persons eye. A lot of people who initially say they saw white and gold started to see blue and black after they looked at a modified version of the picture where the blue had been intensified and the gold was darkened. Some people are able to see both versions of the dress by adjusting the way their brain interprets the colors. The brain is always filling in details that it expects to see, even when those details don't exist.


originally posted by: ChaoticOrder
a reply to: InTheFlesh1980

After looking at that that picture it's actually much easier to understand how some people are seeing blue and black. It depends on how you view the bluish color. When I was thinking of the blue as a white it was much easier to see the gold. But after you posted that picture showing the blue it was easier to see the blue in the original picture and then I also started to see the gold become blacker. It was completely bizarre actually. I think it's because we intuitively know that certain colors go together on clothing. Like a white dress will have gold trimming but a blue dress is unlikely to have gold trimming so the brain turns it into a darker color. So it all depends on how you interpret the whitish blue color.


EDIT: oh I see your quote does actually mention this:

Your brain does its own white balancing automatically, meaning that you're either ignoring the blue hue, giving a white/gold image, or ignoring the yellow hue, giving a blue/black photo.

edit on 26/2/2015 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:04 PM
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How am I supposed to know if that thing actually is a dress?



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:10 PM
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a reply to: ChaoticOrder




Some people are able to see both versions of the dress by adjusting the way their brain interprets the colors.


Yeah, it reminds me of the ability to see a train passing from left to right or right to left.

I just imagine a different light source. Initially and without focusing it still looks blue and gross brown gold. Also noticed that smaller seemingly further away pictures make it much more blue and black to me.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:10 PM
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it's not a dress?

a reply to: CharlieSpeirs



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:14 PM
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Here's a very possible explanation on what's happening with today's crazy dress posted all over -

Clicky

I have no light aside from the light coming from my T.V. and laptop, which probably explains why I see it as gold/white. Yet even with the lights turned on, I still see it as gold/white. However, it's still pretty dim in my house whether lights are on or not.. When I first viewed it from Gizmodo it was blue/black, but that was earlier in the day when light came through the windows. Maybe that has something to do with it?

Edit, ok daaskapital already posted this link.


edit on 26-2-2015 by Wookiep because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-2-2015 by Wookiep because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:17 PM
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originally posted by: ChaoticOrder
a reply to: daaskapital

I think it has more to do with how the brain interprets colors rather than the number of rods and cones in a persons eye. A lot of people who initially say they saw white and gold started to see blue and black after they looked at a modified version of the picture where the blue had been intensified and the gold was darkened. Some people are able to see both versions of the dress by adjusting the way their brain interprets the colors. The brain is always filling in details that it expects to see, even when those details don't exist.


originally posted by: ChaoticOrder
a reply to: InTheFlesh1980

After looking at that that picture it's actually much easier to understand how some people are seeing blue and black. It depends on how you view the bluish color. When I was thinking of the blue as a white it was much easier to see the gold. But after you posted that picture showing the blue it was easier to see the blue in the original picture and then I also started to see the gold become blacker. It was completely bizarre actually. I think it's because we intuitively know that certain colors go together on clothing. Like a white dress will have gold trimming but a blue dress is unlikely to have gold trimming so the brain turns it into a darker color. So it all depends on how you interpret the whitish blue color.


EDIT: oh I see your quote does actually mention this:

Your brain does its own white balancing automatically, meaning that you're either ignoring the blue hue, giving a white/gold image, or ignoring the yellow hue, giving a blue/black photo.



Look at the side by side the lower right side where the brown trim is on the wall or on the left where the black and white table cloth is its way brighter on the white and gold pic.



Peace.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:21 PM
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originally posted by: Domo1
a reply to: ChaoticOrder



Some people are able to see both versions of the dress by adjusting the way their brain interprets the colors.


Yeah, it reminds me of the ability to see a train passing from left to right or right to left.

It reminds me of this illusion. What way is the women spinning, clockwise or anti-clockwise?


Answer: it's possible to see the women spinning clockwise or anti-clockwise depending on how your brain interprets the image. It's also possible to train your brain to see the women spinning in both directions.
edit on 26/2/2015 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



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