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Stars Can't Be Seen from Outer Space

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posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 08:28 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: OneBigMonkeyToo
a reply to: TerryDon79


Also, this video has footage of the Sun shining through the CM and LM windows, once even directly into the camera. I believe GaryN was demanding this sort of stuff in the previous posts.


Fantastic video mate. Lots of stuff i havent seen before




posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 03:23 AM
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A couple more latest images of stars from the ISS:

With the fantastic-looking zodaical light: eol.jsc.nasa.gov...


The dazzling Milky Way: eol.jsc.nasa.gov...


And here's a very fantastic time-lapse video using images like that: www.youtube.com...



My God, it's full of stars!

I especially like the footage of the Andromeda galaxy rising above the limb. One can see from a video like this one that the Earth's atmosphere isn't making stars look any brighter or more visible, it's quite the opposite actually.

~~~

And finally, a nice little article about this topic: briankoberlein.com...
edit on 13-7-2016 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 11:28 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Lovely photos. When do I get to see one looking AWAY from Earth, not towards it.

briankoberlein.com...

The man is an arrogant SOB. He has banned myself and a number of others for asking questions that he can not easily answer. Isn't interested in empirical science at all, just parrots the mainstream tripe.



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 11:38 AM
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a reply to: cooperton

maybe the suns glare of the moon was impeding him in seeing the stars...



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 01:35 PM
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originally posted by: GaryN
a reply to: wildespace

Lovely photos. When do I get to see one looking AWAY from Earth, not towards it.


GIYF

linda043.wordpress.com...



briankoberlein.com...

The man is an arrogant SOB. He has banned myself and a number of others for asking questions that he can not easily answer. Isn't interested in empirical science at all, just parrots the mainstream tripe.



I like him already...



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 01:54 PM
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All you have to do is look

earthsky.org...

(top image)

spaceflight.nasa.gov...


edit on 13/7/2016 by OneBigMonkeyToo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 02:05 PM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

Sure, lots of images of the milky way from the ISS, all taken from the cupola which means they are looking through Earths upper atmosphere, which is why I want to see an image looking away from Earth where there is much less atmosphere to make the stars visible. That can only be done from a topside EVA. If they could image the milky way from the ISS and it did not involve the Earths atmosphere, then they should have been able to photograph the Milky way from cislunar space, they couldn't. Nor the Sun, or the planets. Why can you not accept Armstrongs words, cislunar space is totally black?



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: GaryN
a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

Sure, lots of images of the milky way from the ISS, all taken from the cupola which means they are looking through Earths upper atmosphere, which is why I want to see an image looking away from Earth where there is much less atmosphere to make the stars visible. That can only be done from a topside EVA. If they could image the milky way from the ISS and it did not involve the Earths atmosphere, then they should have been able to photograph the Milky way from cislunar space, they couldn't. Nor the Sun, or the planets.


I had a little bet that the goalposts would move.

Whatever. You asked for photos, you got them - again.


Why can you not accept Armstrongs words, cislunar space is totally black?



Why would I deliberately misinterpret his words and lie about what he meant?

Here's that in mission quote again that you always ignore:


Houston, it's been a real change for us. Now we are able to see stars again and recognize constellations for the first time on the trip. It's - the sky is full of stars. Just like the nightside of Earth.



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 09:04 PM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo
I had a little bet that the goalposts would move.




Whatever. You asked for photos, you got them - again.

And again, not looking directly away from Earth, they can't from the Cupola.





Here's that in mission quote again that you always ignore:
Houston, it's been a real change for us. Now we are able to see stars again and recognize constellations for the first time on the trip.


So they couldn't see stars for most of the journey, sounds right to me, the sky would be black.




It's - the sky is full of stars. Just like the nightside of Earth.


OK, I'll believe him, though I don't know if he was looking through the optics at the time he said that. Still, I will not be satisfied until I see Empirical science performed, and we should expect nothing less from NASA.



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 01:59 AM
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- "Houston, it's been a real change for us. Now we are able to see stars again and recognize constellations for the first time on the trip. It's—the sky is full of stars. Just like the nightside of Earth. But all the way here, we have only been able to see stars occasionally and perhaps through the monocular, but not recognize any star patterns."
- new meaning, new direct conclusions, and much more indirect thoughts!



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 03:14 AM
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originally posted by: GaryN
And again, not looking directly away from Earth

Why would they have to look directly away from Earth? Does looking directly up (90 degrees) offer a completely black patch, while looking any lower (for example 40-50 degrees) suddenly makes stars appear? Why? What do you base these suppositions on?

The ISS is skimming the uppermost layers of the uppermost atmosphere (marked by the faint red airglow and aurora). Looking even slightly up from the horizontal will give you atmosphere-less views of space. Many of these starry ISS shots are using wide-angle lends (like the 28mm), meaning they give you a view reaching quite far out into space, up to 45 degrees and beyond if the camera has been angled upwards a bit.

I'll post this picture again to help you out:



~~~

So, out with hand-waving and weaseling out, and let's see some actual proof.

P.S. And look what I've just found! eol.jsc.nasa.gov... A starry shot using 28mm lens, with Earth nowhere in sight (although the hint of red in the top left corner might by the red airglow). That's got to be looking very far into deep space.


edit on 14-7-2016 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: wildespace



Why would they have to look directly away from Earth? Does looking directly up (90 degrees) offer a completely black patch,


Now you got the picture. Hadfield callled it a "bucket of stars", so stars all around, but looking directly away from Earth, there will be a black hole at the top of the bucket.




while looking any lower (for example 40-50 degrees) suddenly makes stars appear? Why? What do you base these suppositions on?


Without tests it is not known, except to topside EVA astronauts, what angle the stars would begin to dim, or if they would appear different colours, as the Russian astronauts claim, as the viewing angle changes. This image seems to show red stars.
(edit:forget this one, just looked at the EXIF data)
eol.jsc.nasa.gov...
And here is one clearly showing the Earths atmosphere, so the image you show is just one that is taken when the atmosphere is not in shot. NASA knows what they are doing.
eol.jsc.nasa.gov...
There are a few astronauts, such as Leroy Chiao, who quite clearly stated that looking away from Earth it is totally black. Interesting that he is the co-founder and president of Black Moon Corporation, a space and conservation startup. Looking away from Earth, the Moon is not visible either. Nothing is.



edit on 14-7-2016 by GaryN because: missing link

edit on 14-7-2016 by GaryN because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 12:43 PM
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originally posted by: GaryN
Looking away from Earth, the Moon is not visible either. Nothing is.



Possibly the stupidest thing I've read on the internet.

So when astronauts describe the moon from cislunar space, or stars and planets from cislunar space, or when probes take photographs of the moon from lunar orbit or cislunar space or any other kind of space, how are they managing that?

Explain this picture, taken on film

www.lpi.usra.edu...



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 01:30 PM
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originally posted by: GaryN
a reply to: wildespace



Why would they have to look directly away from Earth? Does looking directly up (90 degrees) offer a completely black patch,


Now you got the picture. Hadfield callled it a "bucket of stars", so stars all around, but looking directly away from Earth, there will be a black hole at the top of the bucket.



Stop making up lies. Its getting pathetic now.



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 06:00 PM
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a reply to: GaryN
How can such an insignificant, almost non-existant amout of the atmosphere as there is above the ISS make those stars bright enough to appear on regular long-exposure DSLR photos? Going by that, stars should be dazzingly bright when seen from Earth through the full atmosphere.

Sorry, but your generalisations and vague arguments don't hold any water. Stars should be getting noticeably dimmer starting from at least the red airglow and beyond. But they aren't.

In that starry 28mm shot I posted, even if the Earth's airglow is just out of shot, it should be seeing space at about 45 to 50 degrees above the Earth's limb. And that's practically looking into deep, airless space. www.nikonians.org...



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 09:59 PM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo




Possibly the stupidest thing I've read on the internet.


When Armstrong said it was black in space, he meant it. He did not say the Moon and Sun were visible from cislunar space.
This image might shed some light on the situation, if the experiment data was available.
www.nasa.gov...
You guys really don't understand just how badly you have been conned.


(post by choos removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)

posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 11:23 PM
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originally posted by: GaryN

When Armstrong said it was black in space, he meant it. He did not say the Moon and Sun were visible from cislunar space.


He also did not say "wow Houston, I really have no clue where the sun and moon are because they are invisible"

I'll repeat it again, because it does't seem to be penetrating your skull: saying the sky is black does not mean there is nothing else in it. If I go out on a clear night andyou ask me what colour the sky is, I'll say black.



This image might shed some light on the situation, if the experiment data was available.
www.nasa.gov...


Sham you didn't post the link to the experiment:

www.nasa.gov...




Use of the ISS as a photographic platform eliminates atmosphere image distortion present in Earth based images.


'eliminates atmospheric distortion'.

So, having said when you look away from Earth you can't see the moon from the ISS you post a photo of the moon taken from the ISS?

Really?



You guys really don't understand just how badly you have been conned.


And after years of posting this nonsense everywhere you can find an being told by people who are vastly more informed on the topic than you are, you still don't understand that you are wrong. You don't get banned from places because you're right, you get banned because you don't listen.

See if you can find a terrestrial image with the same exposure characteristics of those we posted above that shows the same number of stars.
edit on 14/7/2016 by OneBigMonkeyToo because: wierd typo



posted on Jul, 15 2016 @ 12:53 AM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo



So, having said when you look away from Earth you can't see the moon from the ISS you post a photo of the moon taken from the ISS?


Which window/porthole. Time and date. Exposure settings.



posted on Jul, 15 2016 @ 02:08 AM
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originally posted by: GaryN

When Armstrong said it was black in space, he meant it. He did not say the Moon and Sun were visible from cislunar space.


so the moon is invisible from cislunar space?



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