It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Stars Can't Be Seen from Outer Space

page: 37
40
<< 34  35  36    38  39  40 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 12:46 PM
link   
a reply to: wildespace



Are your ideas actually based on some experiment, science paper, etc?


There are no experiments FFS! Simple as they are, NASA will not do them, they have no interest in destroying the accepted models, and will not allow anyone else to do the experiments. So what else can I do other than take the word of the people who have been into space and seen (or not seen) for themselves what it is like out there. Neil Armstrong will always be a hero to me, not just because he dare to put his life at risk to go out there, but because he had the integrity to tell the truth that NASA does not want us to know. It is totally black in cislunar space, nothing is visible by eye. If you can't accept that, it is a problem with your view of reality, not his, or mine.




posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 12:46 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

Phage, You most likely find things that are interesting, but utterly ignorant to others.

Why so upset over a Video that i find interesting. No need to insult me by accusing me of being ignorant simply because you don't like someone else's view of the planet.


edit on 6/8/2016 by awareness10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 12:48 PM
link   
a reply to: wildespace

Yes i know, it's all woo woo to me because nothing is real on planet silly.

I just found this part of the woo woo, interesting.
edit on 6/8/2016 by awareness10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 12:54 PM
link   
a reply to: GaryN
How did NASA learn "the truth", for them to be able to hide it in the first place? What about the Soviets, they were first in space after all?

How does one come to the conclusion that you can't see light in space?

You keep mentioning Apollo astronauts, and I can only keep mentioning that they did see stars in cislunar space and in lunar orbit. I have quoted their transcripts in this thread many times.

But with my question, I had hoped to leave the subjective interpretation of astronauts' reports or whether pictures of star have or haven't been taken in space, and put focus on the actual basis of your theory.

Or, if you don't want to put the spotlight on yourself, let's tak about Eric Dollard. What gave him the idea that light is invisible in space? Is there any research, papers, experiments, equations behind all this?
edit on 8-6-2016 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 04:02 PM
link   
a reply to: GaryN

What Nikon do you have again and what exposure setting auto or manual



posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 05:26 PM
link   

originally posted by: wmd_2008
a reply to: GaryN

What Nikon do you have again and what exposure setting auto or manual


That was my old Coolpix 990 on full auto. I imagine it was trying to set aperture and exposure time way beyond its limits and the software is likely written to prevent sensor damage.



posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 07:04 PM
link   

originally posted by: GaryN

originally posted by: wmd_2008
a reply to: GaryN

What Nikon do you have again and what exposure setting auto or manual


That was my old Coolpix 990 on full auto. I imagine it was trying to set aperture and exposure time way beyond its limits and the software is likely written to prevent sensor damage.



Just as a matter of interest I thought I'd try and find out the camera details for the shot of Sunita touching the Sun to see if it was on auto and what exposure settings it used. I should have known better.
eol.jsc.nasa.gov...



posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 09:21 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

Here is an example of the use of the term "solar flux":


6. Solar energy is converted naturally into wood biomass with an efficiency of about 0.1 percent. Suppose a wood lot of 100 hectares (106 m2) is located in Missouri, where the average annual solar flux is 200 watts/m2. Given that the heat value for wood is 12 MBtu/ton, how many tons of wood can be produced by this property each year?

An Energy Primer for the AP Environmental Science Student








posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 10:36 PM
link   

originally posted by: GaryN

originally posted by: GaryN

originally posted by: wmd_2008
a reply to: GaryN

What Nikon do you have again and what exposure setting auto or manual


That was my old Coolpix 990 on full auto. I imagine it was trying to set aperture and exposure time way beyond its limits and the software is likely written to prevent sensor damage.



Just as a matter of interest I thought I'd try and find out the camera details for the shot of Sunita touching the Sun to see if it was on auto and what exposure settings it used. I should have known better.
eol.jsc.nasa.gov...


regex.info...




Camera: Nikon D2Xs
Lens: 10.5 mm f/2.8
Exposure: Auto exposure, Program AE, 1/500 sec, f/11, ISO 200
Flash: none
User Comment: NASA 1118 40.1F
Date: September 5, 2012 4:37:14PM (timezone not specified)
(3 years, 9 months, 3 days, 3 hours, 57 minutes, 13 seconds ago, assuming image timezone of US Pacific)
File: iss032e025275.NEF
4,288 × 2,848 JPEG (12.2 megapixels)
1,491,636 bytes (1.4 megabytes)
Color Encoding: Embedded color profile: “sRGB”



posted on Jun, 9 2016 @ 06:02 AM
link   

originally posted by: wildespace
a reply to: GaryN
How did NASA learn "the truth", for them to be able to hide it in the first place? What about the Soviets, they were first in space after all?

How does one come to the conclusion that you can't see light in space?

You keep mentioning Apollo astronauts, and I can only keep mentioning that they did see stars in cislunar space and in lunar orbit. I have quoted their transcripts in this thread many times.

But with my question, I had hoped to leave the subjective interpretation of astronauts' reports or whether pictures of star have or haven't been taken in space, and put focus on the actual basis of your theory.

Or, if you don't want to put the spotlight on yourself, let's tak about Eric Dollard. What gave him the idea that light is invisible in space? Is there any research, papers, experiments, equations behind all this?


Not only that but i have heard in person straight from the mouths of Chris Hadfield and Alexei Leonov (2 separate occasions) that they saw billions of stars in space. But i guess GaryN thinks they are lying



posted on Jun, 9 2016 @ 08:02 AM
link   
a reply to: ConnectDots

Solar Flux is the rate at which solar energy is received over an area, and is usually given in Watts per square meter. It's the solar version of "radiant flux", which is the amount of energy received -- or even given off by a source -- over a given area.



posted on Jun, 9 2016 @ 08:22 AM
link   
a reply to: Box of Rain

Thanks!

You sound as if you might use this information on the job.


. . . where the average annual solar flux is 200 watts/m2.

An Energy Primer for the AP Environmental Science Student


That 2 must be a footnote. Otherwise it would read "solar flux is 200 watts/m," correct?


edit on 6/9/2016 by ConnectDots because: Add



posted on Jun, 9 2016 @ 09:13 AM
link   
a reply to: ConnectDots

watts/m2 is correct -- "Watts per square meter" or "Watts per meter squared".

Geometrically speaking, a linear meter has no area, so (geometrically speaking) no energy could fall upon a linear meter.



posted on Jun, 9 2016 @ 09:40 AM
link   
a reply to: Box of Rain

watts/m2 is correct -- "Watts per square meter" or "Watts per meter squared".


I should have known that. Duh.

Thanks for not belittling me.



posted on Jun, 9 2016 @ 11:28 AM
link   
a reply to: nataylor




regex.info...


Thanks for that, searching had not brought up that info or site. Does the information tell us anything significant? Searching for photographing the Sun brings up warnings that even 1/8000 and f/22 and ISO 100 will still fry the sensor.
www.imagen-estilo.com...

@3danimator2014



Not only that but i have heard in person straight from the mouths of Chris Hadfield and Alexei Leonov (2 separate occasions) that they saw billions of stars in space. But i guess GaryN thinks they are lying


No I don't think they are lying, and I don't think they are lying when they say it is totally black out there, it depends if you are looking through Earths atmosphere, or are looking out away from Earth where there is not enough atmosphere to make the stars visible. Why can nobody understand such a simple concept?
www.youtube.com...



posted on Jun, 9 2016 @ 02:55 PM
link   
a reply to: GaryN

Hi just took a couple of sun pics broke the rules in your link on mobile just now will post if I get home early enough tonight.


edit on 9-6-2016 by wmd_2008 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2016 @ 09:54 PM
link   

originally posted by: GaryN

No I don't think they are lying, and I don't think they are lying when they say it is totally black out there, it depends if you are looking through Earths atmosphere, or are looking out away from Earth where there is not enough atmosphere to make the stars visible. Why can nobody understand such a simple concept?





heres an image of Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti..

the picture was taken inside the ISS and we can see the edges of earth.
so clearly we are looking through an atmosphere.

according to your theory we should be seeing billions of stars.. where are they?



posted on Jun, 9 2016 @ 10:17 PM
link   
a reply to: choos



according to your theory we should be seeing billions of stars.. where are they?


Earth is much too bright of course, the camera has chosen the appropriate settings, to short an exposure for stars to show.



posted on Jun, 9 2016 @ 10:30 PM
link   

originally posted by: GaryN
a reply to: nataylor
Searching for photographing the Sun brings up warnings that even 1/8000 and f/22 and ISO 100 will still fry the sensor.
www.imagen-estilo.com...

That's not what the article is saying. It's saying that without additional filters, the image will be overexposed. With regards to the sensor, the article is only warning against using the Liveview for more than a few seconds, as during the Liveview the shutter is open, and having it open for that long looking at the Sun can indeed damage the sensor.

There are numerous photos of the Sun from the ISS taken with a Nikon camera, again just search that ISS image archive for them.
edit on 9-6-2016 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2016 @ 11:31 PM
link   

originally posted by: GaryN
a reply to: choos



according to your theory we should be seeing billions of stars.. where are they?


Earth is much too bright of course, the camera has chosen the appropriate settings, to short an exposure for stars to show.




timelapse footage from the ISS i should be seeing millions of stars during the nighttime scenes (according to your theory but i only see a handful.

what was your claim about the moon being visible again?? was it due to the extremely thin lunar atmosphere??



new topics

top topics



 
40
<< 34  35  36    38  39  40 >>

log in

join