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Majority Of Republican Primary Voters Want To Establish Christianity As A National Religion

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posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 05:58 AM
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originally posted by: rebelv
a reply to: ~Lucidity

I completely agree with you OP. Why do a poll, when it isn't
going to happen, period.

Rebel 5



Did Naziism happen? Did ISIS happen?




posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 06:02 AM
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a reply to: Tangerine

Granted the end result is the same living under the brotheel of an oppressor.. But one comes from the church the other just the people in power.

Minute differences yes... But still a difference.

Because I have watched the good church can do to help someone to a degree the fed never can.

Typically anything thr fed touches becomes a steaming pile with a quickness.

Edit to add: I'm a Catholic married to a witch...last thing I want to see is a theocracy... I just don't see it happening because a few fringe groups out of 330 million people want it.
edit on 27-2-2015 by Irishhaf because: additional thought



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 07:19 AM
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Hell 57% of republicans already think this is a Christian nation. I've seen it on here and commented on it several times myself.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 07:25 AM
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originally posted by: AboveBoard
Wait a minute. I thought the Constitution was a nearly sacred document, second only to the Bible, that Obama and Liberal Scum were trampling to death and burning like cigarette papers... OR is it nearly sacred and untouchable as long as it says what you want it to say, but not so much when you don't like what it says...?? SO many contradictions.

This actually doesn't surprise me, as in order to be a Fundamentalist and believe 100% in the Bible as Revealed Word of God, you have to be very okay with contradictions and 'interpretations' that best suit your denomination.

Okay, I don't want to be unfair here, and I don't want to stir up any religious wrath, but when I was invited to look at Fundamentalism by a friend in High School, I didn't get very far because my questions were too disturbing. Apparently, I had the "devil" on my shoulder... (Yes. I was told that. And yes, it freaked me out when I realized they were serious.) That is when I realized I couldn't stop thinking, and therefore could not join my friend's church. Even so, I fully believe in the right of others to have their Fundamentalist beliefs, as is a protection under the Constitution, just so long as they are not trying to eliminate my right to believe religiously or otherwise what I choose to believe.

*sigh*

Unless we destroy the Constitution, this won't happen. According to the Founding Fathers, it SHOULDN'T happen. Even a Conservative SCOTUS would have to see this as anti-Constitutional. Right????

- AB

While some could argue this, the US includes "God" in many things. I don't personally feel that means Christian. Everyone that believes in any religion believes in a "God". I don't follow any religion, but in the scope of things, I guess you could say I believe "God" was another race that seeded this planet. So with that said...I don't care if "under God" or "in God we trust" is used in the US and government.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 07:26 AM
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a reply to: AutumnWitch657

I blame that on poor education. Namely history education. Is it any surprise that states like Oklahoma are trying to get rid of AP history classes because they show America in a bad light?



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 07:27 AM
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a reply to: WeAreAWAKE

The US has god in a lot of places thanks to the 50's. God being plastered all over the place is a recent thing.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 07:35 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: WeAreAWAKE

The US has god in a lot of places thanks to the 50's. God being plastered all over the place is a recent thing.

I didn't mean to...and don't think I did imply otherwise. I just don't really care even though I don't believe in a "God". To me, "God" is synonymous with "creator" and since something created us (person, nature, chemical reaction, etc.) it doesn't bother me to have the word used. As you well know...some people want "God" taken out of everything and I personally believe that many of those people just have an agenda of cramming their disbelief in other people's faces...but...I don't need "God" removed from America. I just don't care.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 07:51 AM
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a reply to: WeAreAWAKE

It's easier to see where the people trying to get god removed from all these places are coming from when you look at it as them trying to fix a mistake instead of pick at tradition. God shouldn't have been plastered up all over the place to begin with, so the appeal to tradition that Christians use when they get offended that people want to remove God from money or the Pledge (tbh the Pledge should be scrapped altogether, brainwashing nonsense that is) or whatever is incorrect.

You may not care about these issues because you don't think it effects you or you have a very broad definition of god. That's great, but these events are subverting the very first Amendment in the Bill of Rights by honoring one religion above all others. It's an erosion of OUR rights as citizens. So when you look at it like that, it is easier to see why it is a problem.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: Edumakated

First of all the first settlers were not the pilgrims. The first settlers who came here in 1602 under Capt John Smith settled in Jamestown Va.on behalf of King James to establish this continent as a colony of England. They had no thoughts of starting a new nation.
The Puritans ( still not pilgrims) came 55 years later and they were fleeing religious persecution as then Queen Elizabeth under King Charles wanted to make the Angelican religion in the church of England "The Church" and they thought they would be free to start a colony under the puritan religion. They also had no thoughts of starting a new nation.
It wasn't until 150 years or so later when King George started his if you take a walk I'll tax your feet regime did the colonists start thinking of independence from England and that had nothing to do with religion either. Remember the Boston tea party? The revolution was about money.


PS: Just a point I'd like to make: THE PURITANS made a pilgrimage to the American continent and that is why they were referred to as pilgrims. They didn't call themselves pilgrims.
edit on 2272015 by AutumnWitch657 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:11 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko


Sure I'll take Kansas. I grew up there and most of my family is there. Not to mention my alma and their football team. We'd keep the best college football, too, with those states.


Erm - NO YOU WON'T. Brownback SUCKS, and he IS A DOMINIONIST. His policies are utter failures.
Who gives a rat's ass about "college football"? Speak for yourself - fine. Speak for who you'll "take" and them's fightin' words.
I grew up here, too. In LAWRENCE - which happens to be on the "map" you so despised that windword offered. You must've gone to K-State...or some 'religious' college.

Keep your Bible-thumping mitts OFF of me and mine. And you whine about being "flown over."

*eye roll*

As for secession - I'd be only too happy to leave Kansas forever - and you people encouraging "Christian statehood" would find that your populations would IMMEDIATELY become stupider than they already are. People are already fleeing Kansas.

edit on 2/27/2015 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)

edit on 2/27/2015 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:13 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

I live near what is called the historic triangle. The area of Virginia which contained Jamestown, Yorktown, and Williamburg. History is part of our tourism and I'm a history buff. I've been to the original Jamestown island ruins. Fascinating.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:32 AM
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originally posted by: AutumnWitch657
a reply to: Krazysh0t

I live near what is called the historic triangle. The area of Virginia which contained Jamestown, Yorktown, and Williamburg. History is part of our tourism and I'm a history buff. I've been to the original Jamestown island ruins. Fascinating.


Me too. History and science are the keys to understanding the future. Interestingly, fundamentalist Christians try to block education in both of those subjects.
edit on 27-2-2015 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:33 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

What???? California started as a desert and was one until the Hoover dam was built in Nevada/Arizona. Lake Meade provides water for Nevada Arizona and California.
California is not making itself a desert. Quite the opposite.
edit on 2272015 by AutumnWitch657 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:39 AM
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originally posted by: ManFromEurope

originally posted by: Develo

originally posted by: ~Lucidity
Just another way to divide us even further. And I'm calling them on it.


Correct me if I'm wrong but since 1954 the US are a Christian nation as displayed by their pledge of allegiance:


I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.



I can only wonder about the similarity to this one:

"Children practicing the Hitler salute". I mean, really, why did they come up with this thing, which is so deceivingly similar to the Hitler salute?



There are only 3 main monotheistic religions and only Christians call their god "God".

Uhm... what do you think could "Allah" be translated to? Right, it means "the one and only God".



Hence any American taking this pledge (especially officials) are expressing allegiance to a Christian nation.


Yeah, or they are just parrots, repeating a meaningless parole as so many others did before them. Peer pressure?


The United States introduced "Under God" into the pledge in order to single out "communists" who would be unwilling to put their trust into God as per Marx's criticism of religion as he also cited it as a source for world conflicts and stagnation of progress. (Which I sort of agree with and sort of don't. The Church united many governments and preserved knowledge though the dark ages) even with all the sickness it introduced and wars it dragged on.

The communist manifesto states that all religion is utilized by the bourgeois in order to give the proletariat false hope and futility. Many communist-ic doctrines promoted state atheism, basically they did not encourage any religion, some communist-ic countries banned its practice some communist-ic countries didn't.

The resonating reasoning was that a belief in a false savior will suppress the call to action needed to change the class system. I don't exactly agree with the full denouncement or every object of the reasoning, but functionally it does make sense as to why they would state that. I also don't agree with the communist manifesto's call for violent overthrow being necessary to move towards a better system.

But that is the historical context which put pressure at the time (1954 to now, and still) to add "Under God" into the pledge of allegiance. As well as the backing of religious zealots.

It has since never left this pledge.


BlubberyConspiracy
edit on 2015 by BlubberyConspiracy because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:49 AM
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originally posted by: AutumnWitch657
Remember the Boston tea party? The revolution was about money.
It was also, in a very big way, about land...land the Brits had set aside as First Nations territory.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 08:58 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

I'm flabbergasted at the talk of secession and civil war going on in this thread. And by the complete lack of knowledge too. If there was video accompanying these posts all you'd see is my mouth falling open and my head shaking while I mouth the words oh my god.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 09:02 AM
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a reply to: AutumnWitch657

It's just hot air. There will be no succession or Civil War over any of this. I'd chalk it up to bad debating tactics and repeating rhetoric these people saw elsewhere online.



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 09:08 AM
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a reply to: JohnnyCanuck

Land=money=power. Still no religion in the equation. I can't believe that some Americans don't know this and believe this country was founded on religion. They're either uneducated or have forgotten an awful lot of what they were taught.
But I'll bet my bottom dollar they know all the words to the Lord's prayer.
edit on 2272015 by AutumnWitch657 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 09:19 AM
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Abraham Lincoln summed it up by stating: Our fathers brought forth upon this continent a new nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
The Gettysburg address was a memorial speech but it also confirmed the reasons for the foundation of our nation. Freedom liberty and equality.
Funny how he ended that speech with the words " the world will little note nor long remember what we say here"...



posted on Feb, 27 2015 @ 09:23 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

Lol there's history online too. Maybe they're using a limited browser!



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