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Is cursive writing relevant today?

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posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 03:42 PM
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There is apparently a nationwide debate going on in the educational systems regarding cursive writing. There are many who believe it is as important today as it was 300 years ago. There are others that believe it isn't relevant in today's technological world. There are some that believe that cursive writing has a benefit beyond that of aesthetics and provides a boost to the developing brain.

Below are two articles from both sides of the spectrum.

Some teachers haven't written off cursive yet

Teaching cursive handwriting is an outdated waste of time

What are your thoughts ATS?
edit on 2/23/2015 by EternalSolace because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:03 PM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

As an IT professional, I am something of a luddite. For us to base our culture in electronic media is ridiculous.


WTF happens when the power goes out?



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:07 PM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

My mother had the most impressive penmanship of anyone I've ever known. Without fail, as a kid, whenever I would hand over a note from my mother to a teacher, I would hear how beautifully written it was.

That said, I think that it's a waste of time considering that with the exception of signatures, a lot of people don't regularly write in cursive. It certainly shouldn't be something that a lot of time is spent learning in my opinion.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:07 PM
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Its faster but I hate it. I cant ever read anyones cursive writing, takes to long to decipher for me. I print so its legible, never cared for the swirly stuff.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:07 PM
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originally posted by: nullafides
a reply to: EternalSolace

As an IT professional, I am something of a luddite. For us to base our culture in electronic media is ridiculous.


WTF happens when the power goes out?[/quote

I so very much look forward to this happening. I watched the new Godzilla movie last night & was laughing the whole time. Huge monsters roaming around emitting enormous EMP auras.. If only people knew the reality of how easily our power grids could go down.
Sorry, this is about cursive writing: the most useless form of writing known to the English language.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:07 PM
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Our school sides on the idea that cursive is beneficial. They believe that it helps to school the brain, and they start the pre-K right out on it. Part of idea is that they go with the research that shows that writing in cursive has a flow that print does not and by going with that flow in writing, it interrupts thought less.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:09 PM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

Sadly our eduication system has been smashed with the Trivium (grammer, logic, rhetoric) no longer taught. Regurgitation of information from federally mandated course books is now education. Grammar is concerned with the thing as-it-is-symbolized, Logic is concerned with the thing as-it-is-known, and Rhetoric is concerned with the thing as-it-is-communicated. At one time it was understood that the debate and critical thing skills were the beginning of wisdom, and requisite preparation for study of everything else. No more.

“We don’t need no education…. Teacher. Leave those kids alone!”



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

They are skipping cursive writing in Finnish schools next year. There will be no teaching it anymore as they have come to conclusion that using cursive is unnecessary and in last 20 years cursive writing use has dropped dramatically down. So they will teach in first school years lettering (print ) and later typing.

Also teaching cursive writing takes too much time which is not benefical.
edit on 23-2-2015 by dollukka because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: nullafides


WTF happens when the power goes out?


People would still be writing, it just wouldn't be in cursive?



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

It would be nice to see " Secretary Hand " being taught.

The handwriting style used by William Shakespeare amongst others. Towards the end of his life he did use cursive.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:13 PM
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I actually like it. Besides, like another poster said, what would happen if the power went out?



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:13 PM
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Yes, it's relevant, as art and history if nothing else.

And that signing legal documents with a thumbprint thing...too weird for me.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:17 PM
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originally posted by: theantediluvian
a reply to: nullafides


WTF happens when the power goes out?


People would still be writing, it just wouldn't be in cursive?


Then when are we going to stop teaching block handwriting? Surely, it's no more necessary than cursive writing is. I mean, EVERYTHING has a keyboard on it...we do not need to kill more trees and hybrid lead/graphite plants to perpetuate out need for handwriting!



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:18 PM
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I was home schooled and my mother didn't bother teaching cursive.

I taught myself around second grade.

Also, it's completely useless unless you're a serial killer or you embroider jackets for a living.

I still can't do Zs properly.


CX

posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:23 PM
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I could cry every time i hear they are stopping skills like this in schools.

A passage that you have to write for the World Handwriting Competition...

"HANDWRITING: that action of emotion, of thought, and of decision that has recorded the history of mankind, revealed the genius of invention, and disclosed the inmost depths of the soulful heart. It gives ideas tangible form through letters, pictographs, symbols, and signs. Handwriting forges a bond across millennia and generations that not only ties us to the thoughts and deeds of our forebears, but also serves as an irrevocable link to our humanity. Neither machines nor technology can replace or equal the contribution or continuing importance of this inexpensive portable skill. Necessary in every age, handwriting remains just as vital to the enduring saga of civilization as our next breath.

CX.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:35 PM
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Cursive is not valid within the modern English language precept except when used in a signature. I use abstract cursive when signing a contract or a binding agreement. I once learned that the cursive font that the Coca-Cola Company uses is called Spencerian Script and is influenced by the middle eastern script that all middle eastern races use in their writing. (In fact the current CEO of the Coca-Cola Company is middle eastern.)

I believe that Spencerian Script and cursive was used heavily in the 1800s all the way up through the end of the 20th century as sort of a way of appeasing those people that it was derived from like a cultural gesture but it has no valid use in modern society.

All Western computers function on the regular English block lettering. I write in block letters myself. Cursive can be difficult to understand at times. Cursive can be seen as a style not native to the English or the English language but a temporary form not meant to become a permanent subset.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:36 PM
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I lean towards cursive being a necessity as well as a tool for creative expression. The benefits of cursive writing far outweigh the difficulty of learning to read it and write in it. Penmanship is, and will always be, an essential part of life.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:38 PM
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As a parent of two children that go to Occupational Therapy, I scribe for both of my children. I was told specifically that children don't practice writing like we did as children. (And I'm mean enough to take notes in cursive when I feel unappreciated )

Children need both manual and technical practice to make it today. I would have never needed someone to take notes for me. We practiced writing in school and out.

FACTOID: you used to be able tell where a person learned to write by the handwriting. School districts used to decide on there own which method to purchase and use.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:43 PM
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a reply to: Iamthatbish

I'd like to add to that. I also view cursive as kind of 'higher vocabulary' for writing skills. I'm not sure if that makes sense, as it's kind of difficult to put into words the comparison I'm trying to make.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:43 PM
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a reply to: wasaka

"Grammar is concerned with the thing as-it-is-symbolized, Logic is concerned with the thing as-it-is-known, and Rhetoric is concerned with the thing as-it-is-communicated. At one time it was understood that the debate and critical thing skills were the beginning of wisdom, and requisite preparation for study of everything else."

I wrote that on my quote board. I hope you don't mind.



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