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Why reading and writing on paper can be better for your brain

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posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 08:48 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

That's pretty cool. I still have one old love letter that I will save forever. No one seems to do that anymore either. You're lucky if you get a text that says, "Sup?" Sigh...kidding. Sorta.




posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 09:11 AM
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I write every day at work... with a pencil and paper. I write notes about received calls, planning for the next day...etc.

I write at home too. I have journals filled with handwritten text.

I don't know if it is helping my brain or not though.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 09:14 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

People look at me funny when I bring my pad and pencil to meetings instead of my laptop or tablet or phone.

They don't realize I do it on purpose. And you know what? I focus on the meeting and what people are saying and retain the information. They don't. Unless they are speaking they're just typing away on their laptops, tablets, and phones.

And they you know what happens? They don't remember a damn thing that went on in the meeting and we have to have another meeting....

I loved this comment on the article...

Literacy's value is proven by the fact we can read carved stone and clay tablets from six thousand years ago, without the mediation of electricity or any form of technology. In six thousand years' time, who will be able to "view", "read" or "audit" the documents now being committed to digital storage direct from the screen they were created on? Who will even know what screens or keyboards were? Written text deveoped to be the most reliable form of storage for speech. It will continue to be that. Read Cicero's orations and hear Cicero speak.


edit on 2/23/2015 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 10:26 AM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity

When starting a project, I always prefer to start with pen and paper for drawings, notes, dialog, story board, etc.

Eventually the concept will find its way to a digital format but I always retain the original concepts for reference if need be.
edit on 23-2-2015 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 10:39 AM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity



People look at me funny when I bring my pad and pencil to meetings instead of my laptop or tablet or phone.

I will admit to using those devices for taking a photo of an area of a piece of equipment to refer to later, but I don't type notes on them.
I wonder what effect it will have on a completely paperless society in the future. My 9 year old son and my 11 year old daughter both love to write. My son wasn't taught any cursive in school, he has me teaching him that on the side.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 11:06 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit
i can commiserate with you on the spider writing , mine is so bad that i now only print , it saves so many problems .

as for exercising our brains , i highly recommend crossword puzzles and more so the cryptic ones .



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 11:19 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy
I love that your passing the cursive on. Wonder if our kids will too? It would be a shame to lose this and all paper over a few more generations' time.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 01:09 PM
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I love writing and have always done it in long hand ....as is the 'old fashioned' term.
Started sending letters via snail mail too!

Never read a digital book, don't intend to either! Love picking up a book at the end of the day and having a good old fashioned read before it clunks on to the floor as I fall asleep



Jane



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 01:11 PM
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a reply to: angelchemuel
This has inspired me to write letters again.

I got a Nook as a present once. Tried it once and just couldn't do it.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 01:17 PM
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a reply to: and14263

I always used to get enormously frustrated. By the time I made extensive notes or flashcards, the simply act of writing the information out almost always made sure I had a high percentage retention of the information, so then, when I went back to study ... I almost always felt like I'd done all that work for naught. But, when I didn't make the effort, I always failed.

I guess it was a good Catch-22 to have.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 01:21 PM
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originally posted by: ~Lucidity
a reply to: butcherguy
I love that your passing the cursive on. Wonder if our kids will too? It would be a shame to lose this and all paper over a few more generations' time.

My eldest daughter is a Senior at Temple University Tyler School of Art. She has done a lot of work with paper and textiles and some of that included text on the media. I can't imagine that artists would ever give that up.

I hope that our children continue to teach their own children cursive. If not, it will be lost, except for the few scholars that learn it, like an ancient language.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 01:21 PM
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a reply to: new_here

No, it's not crazy at all.

When I was working with kids with learning disabilities, one of the things that slowed these kids down was what we called a weak sound/symbol visualization. So we did lots of exercise aimed at getting them to visualize the letter (symbols) in their head and get used to changing out different letters in their head and how that would change the word.

So, yes, your sound/symbol helps with memory. You retain the memory of the symbols you wrote especially if your sound/symbol is strong.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 01:22 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

The new style of calligraphy.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: tom.farnhill

Here is mine...



This example was taken from a journal I wrote, while working at a key cutting kiosk in a big box type of hardware store, a kiosk set up and run by my mothers business partner, and which I none the less ended up manning for more months than was sensible given my lack of tolerance for boredom.

I started writing the journal in order to stave off the worst effects of the aforementioned affliction, and let me tell you, there were days when there was just nothing happening, where it cost more for the travel than was bought in across the counter during the day. The journal contains musings on topics ranging from the amount of business experienced during a day, to events of note that occurred during the shift, the weather, and some matters entirely unrelated to being there.

All in all it was a good plan, but after a considerable period of manning the thing solo for three to four days a week, and sometimes the entire week, the journal became less of an outlet and a record, and more an exercise in navel gazing. Entries were typically between a page and a half, and four pages, with some running on to ten pages long. During my time at the venue, I filled three aA4 ring bound books, of about a hundred pages each. I was also consuming one four to five hundred page volume of fiction a day at my post, thanks to the presence near my counter, of a charity book stand, from which a book could be purchased for thirty pence at the beginning of a shift. It would usually be replaced the next day, or if the day was really slow, at the end of my shift.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 03:35 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

That's hilarious! And your handwriting looks very cool...even though only you can read it!

I have a shelf full of empty journals that I mean to write it...one day. I do but not often enough. More inspiration.

Thanks

edit on 2/23/2015 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 03:41 PM
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Just for fun ...



This is an entire fascinating area of study that typing will kill off.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:12 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: new_here

No, it's not crazy at all.

When I was working with kids with learning disabilities, one of the things that slowed these kids down was what we called a weak sound/symbol visualization. So we did lots of exercise aimed at getting them to visualize the letter (symbols) in their head and get used to changing out different letters in their head and how that would change the word.

So, yes, your sound/symbol helps with memory. You retain the memory of the symbols you wrote especially if your sound/symbol is strong.



Now this reminds me of a fascinating discovery about a learning disabled boy in the fifth grade who was on a 1st grade reading level. He got the usual "b" "d" "p" "q" all mixed up, and just couldn't retain ANY knowledge of vowel sounds for sounding things out. Or so we all thought...

He was in small-group, oral testing for all tests, so during standardized testing when his group was finished testing, he waited in my office until his homeroom was finished. (I was the guidance counselor.)

Anyway... sweet, quiet kid who loved to draw. He was fantastic. He drew things from memory... intricate, realistic drawings of elephants with people riding on them, giraffes, cars... just anything.

One day I said, "How in the world do you remember what those things look like with such amazing detail? I have to be looking at something to reproduce it so well." He just shrugged.

Then it hit me... I asked him if he could draw "Bubble letters" (You know, fat rounded letters like on signs and stuff.) He said "I guess so."

I got some paper and asked him to draw "dad" in bubble letters. He did it without hesitation. I asked him to draw 'bad' and 'dab' and ''pad.' He did this flawlessly.

Then I set those aside and asked him to WRITE dad and bad and dab and pad. You could see the stress come over him. The hesitation and doubt and fear of failure. He botched it.

I said, "Honey you can spell those. You've got some stop-gate in your mind when you hear the word 'write' or 'spell' and I want to talk to your teacher about letting you take your spelling tests by drawing the words, if it's ok with you."

Of course it was, and of course she did, and his spelling grade went from horrible to really good.

I just thought you, being a special ed teacher might find that as fascinating as I did and maybe you've seen such? I remember in college that some tactile learners can learn to spell by tracing words in sand. The mind really is amazing. We do what we believe we can do, in many ways!



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:14 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Cool! You should post that in the new thread on cursive too!



(The slant goes to my lack of photography skills...lol!)
edit on 2/23/2015 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:40 PM
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originally posted by: ~Lucidity
a reply to: ketsuko

Cool! You should post that in the new thread on cursive too!



(The slant goes to my lack of photography skills...lol!)


Nope nope, I think your photography skills made it artsy fartsy cool with the slant!



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 04:53 PM
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I'm of the old school when it comes to reading and writing as well. It's a real paper book for me.
Both my parents were taught the Copperplate cursive writing system and their handwriting looked like art to me from the first time I ever noticed it. But they had no books on how to do it, Mama just taught me the best she could. Then, when I was in first grade I found an old penmanship book called Palmer's Guide to Business Writing that my uncle had used when he was in business school in the early 20th century. As a result I won all sorts of penmanship awards in grade school. By high school I was studying calligraphy and still practice it today.
When I went to college the second time I took notes during class but I also carried a small recorder and after class I would listen to the lecture again and go over my notes, adding to them if needed. Even though my brain was much older than most of the students, I managed to overcome my advanced age and do well by making the extra effort.
I have boxes of handwritten letters handed down through our family----from letters written home by traveling relatives to letters written home by soldiers in both World Wars and right up through Vietnam.
I have a whole shelf of handwritten journals through which my offspring can review my life when I am gone. I find it relaxing and inspiring to put down on paper my hopes, dreams and plans then document the outcomes of those hopes, dreams and plans.



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