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Officials Declare ‘Eating Healthy’ A Mental Disorder

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posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 08:14 PM
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originally posted by: ~Lucidity
In short, if you turn your back on low quality, corporate food containing known cancer causing toxic additives and a rich history of dishonesty rooted in a continuous “profits over people” modus operandi, then you may suffer from a mental illness. The cherry on top is that if you have the pseudo-science labeled disorder of orthorexia nervosa, you will be prescribed known toxic, pharmaceutical drugs from some of the same conglomerate corporations that you are trying to avoid by eating healthy in the first place.


Indeed. Nice find. There are other "controversial" disorders that actually did make it to the Diagostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) that's used by mental health professionals, unlike "orthorexia nervosa." Just making this clear from one of your LINKS:

Orthorexia nervosa is not currently recognized as a clinical diagnosis in the DSM-5


Hence, I could care less what the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) says about it.

Nobody will ever be diagnosed with "orthorexia nervosa," at least not by an ethical psychologist or psychiatrist. In order for anything to be considered a disorder according to the DSM one component of the disorder always involves the disorder causing the inability to function on a day-to-day basis. The symptoms of this so-called "disorder" are actually things that HELP a person to MAINTAIN good health. Consider the symptoms:

1. person is "fixated" on quality and purity of the food you eat. Of course, the term "fixated" is pathetically subjective and easily confused with "concern."

2. person is consumed with what and how much to eat. Of course "consumed" is also quite subjective. It should be a disorder to NOT be very concerned about what you eat!

3. manifestation of an iron clad will to maintain a rigid eating pattern. Laughable because this "rigidity" is about maintaining health through diet and food quality. If that means every time you eat it's more like "consistent" good eating habits.

4. one's self-esteem is affected profoundly by one's diet --the converse of a poor diet negatively affecting self esteem, only it doesn't make sense to not think highly of yourself because you know your diet is not poor. But of course someone's got some questionable agenda here because symptoms of orthorexia nervosa include:

5. Inflated ego based on believing one has a superior diet.


It's funny the webpage asks, "Is Orthorexia An Eating Disorder?" --and the answer is of course, no (because they already said so), then they try to say that it IS an eating disorder similar to other types (but it's not). Then, they ask the question "Do I Have Orthorexia?" which logically can't follow if it isn't really a disorder recognized as such according to the DSM, which requires quite a bit of testing to establish validity before it appears there. You know they have just about no real construct validity for this so-called eating disorder if answering yes to this question is a sure sign:


Do love, joy, play and creativity take a back seat to following the perfect diet



If someone answers yes to this ridiculous question they likely have FAR more serious psychological issues than "orthorexia nervosa."

Psychiatrist Peter Breggin (author of the book Toxic Psychiatry) says these kinds of mental health "associations" like NEDA are often filled with members who are guilty parents. Just saying... In fact, I should alert the American Psychological Association that a group is trying to invent an illness masquerading behind what sounds like a real disorder.




edit on -06:00America/Chicago28Mon, 23 Feb 2015 20:31:49 -0600201549312 by Petros312 because: Addition




posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 09:57 PM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity

Eating Healthy A Mental Disorder?

Thanks for the info! I will eat MORE healthy food.
edit on 23-2-2015 by mekhanics because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity

This whole thing is just slow continuation and advance of Fascism

Frog in boiling water

In the end frog dies you know



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 11:15 PM
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originally posted by: mekhanics
a reply to: ~Lucidity

Eating Healthy A Mental Disorder?

Thanks for the info! I will eat MORE healthy food.

I think the problem is obsessing over eating healthy, to the point where it is unhealthy.

OccamsRazor04 tried to point that out earlier in the thread.



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 02:58 AM
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orthorexia (fixation with taste, texture etc. overly healthful eating behavior disturbances) & is not simply healthful eating. Healthy eating is a good thing to encourage. daily nutritional needs and all that jazz.

I had anorexia nervosa restricting subtype along with purging subtype. i also compulsively over-exercised and had strict dietary rules. but never did i delude myself into actually thinking that i was being healthy. i knew damn well that what i was doing was wrong but...never underestimate the power of "feeling fat".

anyway, nobody is perfect and almost EVERYONE IN THE WORLD has a weird eating habit or two. that doesn't make it a disorder. always remember the 5 D's:

distress

dysfunction

deviance

danger

duration

that means that you have to have significant impairment in all 5 categories to have a mental disorder.

therefore, i don't believe that this article is legitimate.
seems like the authors were making a mountain out of a molehill.

s&f tho ofc. interesting thread

edit on 24-2-2015 by rukia because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 07:52 AM
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Some people take it there. When healthy eating becomes a compulsion, then yeah it is a disorder. I would say having a disorder is not necessary bad. I would say, the point that people have disorders about having disorders is the issue.



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 08:55 AM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity




psychiatry has green lighted a public relations push to spread awareness about their new buzzword “orthorexia nervosa,”


This is why psychiatry is dangerous pseudo science



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 09:44 AM
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Psychiatrists are the most deluded of all. I know only too well, that's why I handed my mental health team written notice to not contact me.



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 10:08 AM
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Most people are concerned about what they're eating, and I don't blame them. Maybe it becomes an obsession for some, but you have only to follow your friends on Facebook to see that many of them are obsessed with one thing or another. I'm not convinced that "obsessive healthy eating" is really a disorder. There are a lot of people who focus on one thing in particular, and I think they need that to give a shape and meaning to their lives.
a reply to: ~Lucidity



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 12:14 PM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity

Can I officially declare that all these "Officials" who are declaring these ridiculous and meaningless disorders, actually share a mental disorder themselves, that forces them to label anyone who differs from them and stands out in any way. We shall call it, "Declorous Mentalis Disordexia".


On a serious note though, anyone who wants to live a healthy lifestyle should be not be criticized or labelled as having as disorder.
edit on 24-2-2015 by acehigh91 because: grammar



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 12:50 PM
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originally posted by: acehigh91
On a serious note though, anyone who wants to live a healthy lifestyle should be not be criticized or labelled as having as disorder.

They are not.

Someone who makes sure to wash their hands regularly are not criticized or labelled as having as disorder. People who wash their hands until they almost bleed, on the other hand, are.

It isn't that hard to see that there is a difference.



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 01:14 PM
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originally posted by: daskakik

originally posted by: acehigh91
On a serious note though, anyone who wants to live a healthy lifestyle should be not be criticized or labelled as having as disorder.

They are not.

Did you even read the article? It clearly says that if you choose to live a healthy lifestyle, you are now being labelled as having a mental disorder. I guess all pro athletes have a mental disorder then.

Washing your hands until they bleed in my opinion is an odd comparison to draw to someone who wants to be healthy. Someone who washes their hands excessviely may be considered a germaphobe, but in reality, those germs will not affect them. However, eating "excessively" healthy versus just eating somewhat healthy WILL make a positive difference in your life. Do YOU see the difference?



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 01:28 PM
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originally posted by: acehigh91
Someone who washes their hands excessviely may be considered a germaphobe, but in reality, those germs will not affect them. However, eating "excessively" healthy versus just eating somewhat healthy WILL make a positive difference in your life. Do YOU see the difference?

But eating "excessively" healthy isn't what the label is being applied to.

Thinking you are "eating "excessively" healthy" when in fact you are hurting yourself is where the label is to be applied.
edit on 24-2-2015 by daskakik because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 01:44 PM
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originally posted by: daskakik
Thinking you are "eating "excessively" healthy" when in fact you are hurting yourself is where the label is to be applied.

--No. The label should not be applied to anyone because it has no construct validity established.

I just contacted the American Psychological Association about whether or not there could be some legal implications involved with presenting what sounds like an official diagnosis (orthorexia nervosa) but that has 1) no construct validity as a discrete psychological illness, and 2) explained to the public as if it's a real psychiatric illness even though stating that it doesn't appear in DSM-5. I'll update when I hear back.


edit on -06:00America/Chicago28Tue, 24 Feb 2015 13:54:05 -0600201505312 by Petros312 because: quote



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: Petros312
--No. The label should not be applied to anyone because it has no construct validity established.

Since when is that a prerequisite?

If it isn't a real illness then why does the OP say that "Officials" have declared anything?
edit on 24-2-2015 by daskakik because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 03:39 PM
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originally posted by: daskakik
If it isn't a real illness then why does the OP say that "Officials" have declared anything?


The "officials" are the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA). To be accurate, it's the author of the article in one of the links in the first post . If she is a mental health professional, she still can't make up a diagnosis like "orthorexia nervosa" and apply it. It's also quite unethical to be giving the public information about something that sounds like an official diagnosis but has had no validity testing for it. A layperson is likely to start using the term "orthorexia nervosa" as if it is a real disorder, which has not been established.



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 03:42 PM
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originally posted by: Petros312
The "officials" are the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA). To be accurate, it's the author of the article in one of the links in the first post . If she is a mental health professional, she still can't make up a diagnosis like "orthorexia nervosa" and apply it.

She didn't: First line of the article:

Orthorexia nervosa is not currently recognized as a clinical diagnosis in the DSM-5, but many people struggle with symptoms associated with this term.



A layperson is likely to start using the term "orthorexia nervosa" as if it is a real disorder, which has not been established.

So, laypersons use terms incorrectly all the time.
edit on 24-2-2015 by daskakik because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 03:49 PM
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This is just to the OP. I haven't read the 8 pages. The bottom line is that the body knows what it needs. Sometimes money gets in the way of nutrition and you eat a lot of carbs. Getting some broccoli after that and your body goes.... aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa. You can actually feel it. Balance is what is needed in an omnivore's diet.



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 04:24 PM
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a reply to: Petros312
Will be looking forward to hearing their response.

Here's an excerpt from "expert blog" on the Mayo site:

Health professionals have proposed that orthorexia be officially recognized as a new mental disorder. Currently it remains controversial and grouped with other not yet accepted disorders such as night eating syndrome, muscle dysmorphia (obsession with muscle building) and emetophobia (constant fear of vomiting).

Whether it's recognized as a true medical problem or not is beside the point. It's important to seek professional help when striving for a healthy diet becomes an overwhelming drive that takes over. Orthorexia that features obsessive compulsive behaviors can be effectively treated with medication and cognitive behavioral therapy by a trained therapist.



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 04:40 PM
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originally posted by: daskakik
Orthorexia nervosa is not currently recognized as a clinical diagnosis in the DSM-5, but many people struggle with symptoms associated with this term.

Examine this quote very carefully as its written.

How can you logically have symptoms for something that doesn't appear in the DSM as a psychological illness? In other words, at the same time she's saying it's not an official diagnosis it's supposedly something that you can still have as a psychological disorder that is manifested by certain symptoms. The author elaborates in much detail what these symptoms are as you continue reading, in fact to the point of absurdity, which is what the OP and others noticed.

Before you get the wrong idea, my point is that there is no disorder that can be called "othorexia nervosa" because to determine what is a psychological disorder or not is an elaborate process (both scientific and political on some levels) that first and foremost requires what's known as validity testing.

If you really want a taste of what I'm talking about, browse this:
The Validity of Psychiatric Diagnosis Revisited
Scroll down to where it says "Types of Validity"

See all the following: Content validity. Criterion validity, and Construct validity

There's an extensive process involved before you can start using the term "orthorexia nervosa" with any real validity. The article from NEDA is dead serious talking about a disorder that simply does not exist. Can someone behave like this?--overly concerned about eating in a healthy way? Of course there are individuals who could become so worried about the food they eat it can cause anxiety, but the question is if this is a discrete psychological illness, particularly manifested by absurd symptoms such as this:



Self-esteem becomes wrapped up in the purity of orthorexics’ diet and they sometimes feel superior to others, especially in regard to food intake.




edit on -06:00America/Chicago28Tue, 24 Feb 2015 16:41:24 -0600201524312 by Petros312 because: formatting



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