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Coyotes, Foxes becoming common sight in residential areas of New Jersey

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posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 11:05 AM
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According to information from the state Department of Environmental Protection Division of Fish and Wildlife, foxes and coyotes are prevalent throughout the state and there is evidence that the coyote population has been on the rise statewide.

In 2012, there were 249 coyotes hunted or trapped in New Jersey. In 2013 that number rose to 299, and 274 in 2014, according to information from the state Department of Environmental Protection.

From Jan. 1 to Feb. 15, 2015, there were 203 coyotes hunted or trapped in New Jersey.

Coyotes have been reported in 430 municipalities in all 21 counties in the state.



Coyotes, Foxes becoming common sight in residential areas of New Jersey



"When it is really cold out and the coyotes are really puffed up they can look wolf-like," said Jerry Malangone, owner of Balance of Nature, a wildlife removal and pest control company based in Tuckerton.



This would explain why people think they're seeing wolves, possibly. Truthfully when we encroach upon their land to build our habitats, where do people expect wild life to go? Eventually they come back if they aren't relocated, and sometimes, even if they are. It's just how it is.



Considine added that DEP sees an increase in reported sightings following media reports of coyotes. Some may be coyotes, he said, while others may actually be foxes or dogs.

This time of year coyotes and foxes are setting up nesting territories and are moving around more than normal, said Diane Nickerson, director of the Mercer County Wildlife Center.

To keep coyotes and foxes away from houses, Nickerson suggested residents make sure the area is free of pet food and garbage container lids are sealed.



Use these suggestions above, but of course, they're not always a guarantee. Of course if you ever see wild life near your home, always call Animal Control, or whatever authority you have in your area, to come trap the animal and relocate it humanely.




posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 11:09 AM
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I live in a fairly suburban neighborhood and I have seen a coyote regularly over the past few days. It usually appears around dawn but I have seen it run across our street in broad daylight. I tried to grab a picture but it just came out looking like a brownish blur.



posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 11:11 AM
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Good!



posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 11:51 AM
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I was involved with a study a few years ago where we put tracking devices on urban coyotes. At night they had run of the city, even in the back alleys of the downtown core. This was in a metropolis with a population of about 1 million.

What it comes down to though is that nobody ever really interfaces with them or even knows they are there. They are far less dangerous than domestic dogs, usually very cautious.

Where I live now there are vast tracks of forest within the city and a very large coyote population. Most people have no idea they are there. Sometimes when the fire department has their sirens going it gets the coyotes howling. Late at night you can even hear them from downtown.

There is a mall here on the edge of wooded creek area and almost each night the coyotes come and scavenge the parking lot for fast food.



posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 12:00 PM
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originally posted by: CraftBuilder
I was involved with a study a few years ago where we put tracking devices on urban coyotes. At night they had run of the city, even in the back alleys of the downtown core. This was in a metropolis with a population of about 1 million.

What it comes down to though is that nobody ever really interfaces with them or even knows they are there. They are far less dangerous than domestic dogs, usually very cautious.

Where I live now there are vast tracks of forest within the city and a very large coyote population. Most people have no idea they are there. Sometimes when the fire department has their sirens going it gets the coyotes howling. Late at night you can even hear them from downtown.

There is a mall here on the edge of wooded creek area and almost each night the coyotes come and scavenge the parking lot for fast food.



That's actually very cool. I love studies like these and hearing an inside perspective. Thanks!




posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 12:15 PM
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Nothing wrong with coyotes.

I see them all the time in Los Angeles. Just keep your small dogs inside at night and you won't have any problems.

They are especially interested in your trash cans on trash pickup day and can be seen the night before getting into the trash looking for food.

They are harmless and don't usually attack people. I've walked along side 3 or 4 at a time. like right beside them. Usually they keep their distance but if they are around humans enough they are kinda like habituated pigeons that don't flee when you walk their way but just walk to the side and let you pass and then go back to doing whatever they were doing. I've never had one do anything threatening to me. And I've even watched them hunt deer and they were not bothered much by me stalking them from a dozen yards back or so to watch them do what they do when they hunt.

Coyotes are almost special because when you look one in the eyes they almost seem like they can communicate with you through their body language and eye contact. Much more so than a dog. It's almost like a telepathic communication although it's really just the mutual body language and intelligence expressed through each others eyes thats causing the sensation. But they are really cleaver animals and people shouldn't freak out over them wandering through your neighborhoods. Just keep the little dogs inside at night and don't let your newborn child sit out in the back yard alone unattended or something and nobody will get hurt. Also your own body language will keep you safe around small predators like coyotes. look like you are on to them and not threatened by them and they will assume you are not threatened by them and for a reason. Act freaked out by them and they might go. maybe this guy is prey.

Sometimes coyotes are a good thing and help get rid of annoying pests in the neighborhood. In this one neighborhood I used to live in in these foothills near encino there was this one super annoying dog that would yap, yap, yap all night long. It was one of those chihuahua dogs. super annoying. So it's yapping like crazy all night and I look out the window across the street in frustration to see to my surprise a trio of coyotes walking down the street. the alpha male goes "whats this? what do we have here" and trots up to the side wall of the property where the chihuahua is on the other side going yap yap yap yap yap. Looks over at me. looks back at the wall. looks back at me with a grin on its face like I'm doing this for you guys and with no prep or running start what so ever jumps and clears the 6 foot wall in one move. Didn't even touch the wall just jumped straight over a 6 foot wall into the neighbors back yard.

yap yap yap yap yap....silence. silence ever since. that coyote was doing the neighborhood a favor. In my book and with many of the other neighbors at the time that coyote and his crew was welcome back anytime.

Great horned owls have similar respect from me too. Saw one once flying off with the neighbors annoying dog too. But that was in a different canyon in LA and a decade or so earlier.



posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 12:25 PM
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a reply to: Anyafaj
This is a coyote pup, freshly equipped with a tracking device that I designed.
The red on its forehead is from dye that we use to tell them apart while they are in our care.




posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 04:20 PM
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a reply to: Anyafaj

Obviously no Coyotes but i live in the heart of the city of Glasgow and there are Foxes around all the time at night, cant keep the little sods away from our bins. Even came across a few Deer that must be following the railway lines.



posted on Feb, 22 2015 @ 12:04 AM
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originally posted by: Anyafaj




Use these suggestions above, but of course, they're not always a guarantee. Of course if you ever see wild life near your home, always call Animal Control, or whatever authority you have in your area, to come trap the animal and relocate it humanely.


Why not leave the animals alone? Or, optionally, move to a complex in a city and never leave it.



posted on Feb, 22 2015 @ 12:18 AM
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I made a thread on this very subject a few years ago, when they 1st started showing up. Found out they were released out of Medford nj, because animal rights wouldn't allow them to be killed. They took off with my cat, I chased it up the road with a bat. I don't like them hanging in my yard, around my boys play sets! Animal control told me NOTHING CAN BE DONE. PERIOD. UNLESS , we kill them ourselves, which of course we wouldnt do, I just wanted them trapped, they will not come out to trap them.....



posted on Feb, 22 2015 @ 10:06 AM
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There are tons of coyotes around here. I hear them running in packs, but never see them. They come close to the house, but never get in the trash or go after my chickens (when I had them). They are shy and stay out of sight and I have no problem with them, but I don't complain about the hunters and their tracking dogs on my property.

If they respect me, I respect them, but in the city, it's possible they could spread disease and cause other problems.



posted on Feb, 22 2015 @ 10:36 AM
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a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

In the city they aren't so shy, but they are also not so desperate for food since there is so much of it around so they don't get too aggressive to humans. At least not in LA. But they aren't shy around here. They don't run or even react if you see them going through the trash and you honk your car horn. They don't even look your way. they ignore you. Kinda frustrating when you want them out of your trash. They are sorta like racoons that way.

If you don't think there are a ton of them around, simply while walking or hiking at night in the outskrits of your local city or large park do a howl and see how many respond. It's freaky when you realize a dozen or so are howling back in unison from only a few hundred feet away. And often from all sides. Also the weird gibberish howls they make when making a kill is eerie. sounds like demons in the woods or something out of the blair witch.

But I like coyotes. Even had lone one cornered in an arroyo once while out shotgunning at night in the desert and looked it in the eye and had a little conversation. it said something in it's body language/eyes like. "common man don't please shoot me, I'm just really hungry! I'm sorry I was snooping around your camp site. Common man don't. I don't wanna die...I just need something to eat. please don't pull that trigger." And I didn't shoot him. I nodded, turned my back and walked away. Later that night I placed some left over carne asada and other stuff we were cooking on a plate and walked a hundred yards or so to where we had our shooting tables set up over the next berm and put the food high up on the table where most predators wouldn't be able to get to it. Went back at sunrise and found the plate on the ground literally licked clean by something that had a tongue the size of a dog and coyote tracks in the desert dust. Poor guy must have been starving. He had no crew or friends and there was nothing to eat out in the calico mountains except rattlesnakes that evening. So I like coyotes I even feed them sometimes. They've never really been a problem to me.



posted on Feb, 22 2015 @ 10:43 AM
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originally posted by: j.r.c.b.
I made a thread on this very subject a few years ago, when they 1st started showing up. Found out they were released out of Medford nj, because animal rights wouldn't allow them to be killed. They took off with my cat, I chased it up the road with a bat. I don't like them hanging in my yard, around my boys play sets! Animal control told me NOTHING CAN BE DONE. PERIOD. UNLESS , we kill them ourselves, which of course we wouldnt do, I just wanted them trapped, they will not come out to trap them.....




I'm surprised. Maybe there are trap specialists in the area now that can trap the animal for you?



posted on Feb, 22 2015 @ 10:45 AM
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originally posted by: BASSPLYR
a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

In the city they aren't so shy, but they are also not so desperate for food since there is so much of it around so they don't get too aggressive to humans. At least not in LA. But they aren't shy around here. They don't run or even react if you see them going through the trash and you honk your car horn. They don't even look your way. they ignore you. Kinda frustrating when you want them out of your trash. They are sorta like racoons that way.

If you don't think there are a ton of them around, simply while walking or hiking at night in the outskrits of your local city or large park do a howl and see how many respond. It's freaky when you realize a dozen or so are howling back in unison from only a few hundred feet away. And often from all sides. Also the weird gibberish howls they make when making a kill is eerie. sounds like demons in the woods or something out of the blair witch.

But I like coyotes. Even had lone one cornered in an arroyo once while out shotgunning at night in the desert and looked it in the eye and had a little conversation. it said something in it's body language/eyes like. "common man don't please shoot me, I'm just really hungry! I'm sorry I was snooping around your camp site. Common man don't. I don't wanna die...I just need something to eat. please don't pull that trigger." And I didn't shoot him. I nodded, turned my back and walked away. Later that night I placed some left over carne asada and other stuff we were cooking on a plate and walked a hundred yards or so to where we had our shooting tables set up over the next berm and put the food high up on the table where most predators wouldn't be able to get to it. Went back at sunrise and found the plate on the ground literally licked clean by something that had a tongue the size of a dog and coyote tracks in the desert dust. Poor guy must have been starving. He had no crew or friends and there was nothing to eat out in the calico mountains except rattlesnakes that evening. So I like coyotes I even feed them sometimes. They've never really been a problem to me.




You're a kind man. You did something, I probably would have done as well, really.




posted on Feb, 22 2015 @ 04:40 PM
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originally posted by: Anyafaj

originally posted by: j.r.c.b.
I made a thread on this very subject a few years ago, when they 1st started showing up. Found out they were released out of Medford nj, because animal rights wouldn't allow them to be killed. They took off with my cat, I chased it up the road with a bat. I don't like them hanging in my yard, around my boys play sets! Animal control told me NOTHING CAN BE DONE. PERIOD. UNLESS , we kill them ourselves, which of course we wouldnt do, I just wanted them trapped, they will not come out to trap them.....




I'm surprised. Maybe there are trap specialists in the area now that can trap the animal for you?


Why not trap and relocate the humans who have moved into their territory?



posted on Feb, 22 2015 @ 04:55 PM
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We have urban foxes, coyotes, deer, raccoons, opossums and even large flocks of wild turkey where I'm at. It just kills me when people still claim there is no wildlife.



posted on Feb, 22 2015 @ 05:08 PM
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originally posted by: Tangerine




Why not trap and relocate the humans who have moved into their territory?



I would love to live in an ideal society where we can live side by side with these beautiful creatures. Sadly, you and I are among the few in this thinking. Getting upset with me for trying to come up with a solution won't change the majority of society's thinking when they would be just as happy killing these beautiful majestic animals. Before I left my last place, I lived out in the country. It was not unusual to see wildlife every morning, or night. Raccoons, possum, egrets, geese, heron, I think, woodpeckers, groundhogs, or something, frogs, you name it. I enjoyed it. I didn't enjoy the holes in my wall where mice were coming in and eating my clothes. But my solution was just to fix the hole in the wall. Simple. The landlord's? Mice traps that killed the mice. Not everyone thinks the way we do.


Edit to add, I grew up with a friend who's mother was a wild life rehabilitator. I saw what happened to some of these animals when they came in contact with society. I saw the process it took to rehabilitate them to allow them to go back into the wild, and those who could never return and had to go to petting zoos, or who were too dangerous and had to go to a regular zoo. I helped out at her house with that animals. I feed a fawn up close that went on to a children's petting zoo after her mother was hit by a car. I'd love for them to be able to live side by side with us. But I have also seen the jerks who AIM their cars at these small animals in the hopes of hitting them and killing them! We used to have a people friendly squirrel who would sit on your lap for peanuts, until a creep purposely aimed his car at it and killed him. You have those who are pro and con when it comes to wildlife in society. I'm pro.


edit on 2/22/2015 by Anyafaj because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2015 @ 06:13 PM
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a reply to: Anyafaj

I applaud your attitude toward wildlife. The problem with trapping and relocating these animals is that more will move into their vacated territories to replace them. It's a never-ending cycle. Trapping and relocating them traumatizes them and breaks up their social units just like trapping and relocating us would. It also kills young nursing animals and results in the starvation or other deaths of young old enough to not nurse but too young to fend for themselves. Ultimately, humans have to accept that we're part of nature and don't have dominion over it. Failure to understand that will lead to our extinction.



posted on Feb, 22 2015 @ 06:17 PM
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originally posted by: Tangerine
a reply to: Anyafaj

I applaud your attitude toward wildlife. The problem with trapping and relocating these animals is that more will move into their vacated territories to replace them. It's a never-ending cycle. Trapping and relocating them traumatizes them and breaks up their social units just like trapping and relocating us would. It also kills young nursing animals and results in the starvation or other deaths of young old enough to not nurse but too young to fend for themselves. Ultimately, humans have to accept that we're part of nature and don't have dominion over it. Failure to understand that will lead to our extinction.



I completely agree, unfortunately society as a whole needs to be made aware, and those that are, just don't care about it.



posted on Feb, 22 2015 @ 06:20 PM
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originally posted by: Anyafaj

originally posted by: Tangerine
a reply to: Anyafaj

I applaud your attitude toward wildlife. The problem with trapping and relocating these animals is that more will move into their vacated territories to replace them. It's a never-ending cycle. Trapping and relocating them traumatizes them and breaks up their social units just like trapping and relocating us would. It also kills young nursing animals and results in the starvation or other deaths of young old enough to not nurse but too young to fend for themselves. Ultimately, humans have to accept that we're part of nature and don't have dominion over it. Failure to understand that will lead to our extinction.



I completely agree, unfortunately society as a whole needs to be made aware, and those that are, just don't care about it.


That's why we're doomed to extinction. For the sake of the rest of the world, that's not a bad thing.



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