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White Coat Disorder

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posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 10:35 PM
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a reply to: Bloodydagger

Could be resurfacing memories of alien abduction-I'm sure that the procto's office would make someone have flashbacks if it were true.

Lol,no,I think it happens to many of us.

From the second you arrive at the hospital (if you happen to be conscious) you will almost invariably start thinking about if someone in there is infected with something nasty.

Then-the blood and fluid tests begin-and you start to think that they might find some kind of deadly illness in your results.

Lots of different kinds of stress before you even get to see the doc can be a paranoia inducing thing.

(depending on your initial condition at arrival)




posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 10:50 PM
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There is another factor with blood pressure depending on the reason you're at the doctors office. Pain will increase the pressure. It was one of the ways we could tell my son was having a true migraine - his blood pressure would be higher than normal.

Last time I went (about 2 weeks ago) was for severe sciatic nerve pain involving the entire leg. Blood pressure was higher than normal - about 140/85. I asked for a second reading, relaxed with some meditation techniques and the next reading was 118/69. That's a lot of pain right there!



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 11:37 PM
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a reply to: Bloodydagger

To answer the OP, yes it's a real thing, and yes it happens to me as well. It's coincidental that you mentioned an ear infection, because I never go to the doctor unless I absolutely have to... and an ear infection is one of those reasons.. I had 2 ear infections from Sept of last year to Jan this year. The last time I had an ear infection, I was like 8. Anyway, both times I went to the ER to get antibiotics for it, my BP was almost exactly as high as yours. They even prescribed the same BP pill along with the same dose as you got. (I think it's standard if they suspect white coat disorder)

The doc even told me it was white coat disorder since it drastically went down on their last BP test before letting me leave that awful place.
edit on 20-2-2015 by Wookiep because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 12:14 AM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: Bloodydagger

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
a reply to: Bloodydagger

What you have presented is not evidence you do not have hypertension. That would require you to take the reading at home without medication.


But will a single pill (10MG) bring your BP down from 175ish all the way down to 123? This was over a span of 4 hours.

I wasn't taking anything prior to that.

It really depends on exactly what you are taking. It's possible the result you noticed is from either option, or a combination of the two. I was not saying your claim is untrue, only that the method you used to test it was faulty and is unable to show you the cause. May I ask what medication/dosage you were prescribed?

I would recommend you monitor your BP before taking more medication, especially because if your BP is normal you could create a problem by lowering it too far. If you notice your BP is perfect for the next week or two with no medication taken it's safe to assume you have no problem.


I stated what I was taking and how many MG.



posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 12:45 AM
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originally posted by: Bloodydagger

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: Bloodydagger

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
a reply to: Bloodydagger

What you have presented is not evidence you do not have hypertension. That would require you to take the reading at home without medication.


But will a single pill (10MG) bring your BP down from 175ish all the way down to 123? This was over a span of 4 hours.

I wasn't taking anything prior to that.

It really depends on exactly what you are taking. It's possible the result you noticed is from either option, or a combination of the two. I was not saying your claim is untrue, only that the method you used to test it was faulty and is unable to show you the cause. May I ask what medication/dosage you were prescribed?

I would recommend you monitor your BP before taking more medication, especially because if your BP is normal you could create a problem by lowering it too far. If you notice your BP is perfect for the next week or two with no medication taken it's safe to assume you have no problem.


I stated what I was taking and how many MG.


I agree with OccamsRazor04.
_____________________________________
I don't think it wise to add a medication to your system, especially one with such bad side effects, unless absolutely necessary. It's also possible that contributing factors may have played a part in your elevated BP.

It's important to note that many Drs are prescribing medications that might not even be needed. I think they should use more caution than they do when Rx'ing these meds with what can be horrible side effects.

As an example, I was recently DX'ed with Diabetes and am now taking Metformin (2000mg per day). I'm taking it because my glucose measured 401. However, because Metformin can cause high blood pressure (according to my Dr), I was RX'ed two other meds along with it; LISINOPRIL 2.5mg, and ATORVASTATIN CALCIUM 40mg. These meds have some nasty side effects, not to mention I'm already taking medications for other ailments.

White coat syndrome can effect your BP, but so does anxiety, pain, stress, etc., and many people get stressed out by appts. anyway, not to mention traffic, waiting in waiting room, and other factors.

If you think that your BP is related to white coat syndrome, it makes sense to me that a person be certain before starting a BP med on a regular basis, but of course.. you can't really take medical advice from random online people either. Those offering opinions though, with ideas that you can check for yourself and might save both money and health-well, makes sense to me, but maybe talk to your Dr first.
edit on 21-2-2015 by RobinB022 because: (no reason given)

edit on 21-2-2015 by RobinB022 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 11:28 AM
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The Dr was just wrong to diagnose and prescribe based on one bp reading.

I used to review Dr charts for quality and this is not standard. Agree with everyone's recommendation to take your on bp a couple weeks with no med and report back. Make sure you are sitting and take it in both arms.

Also agree pain can make bp go up...or down depending on type of pain.

BTW, once that diagnosis is on the chart it doesn't go away easily.



posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 11:41 AM
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I experience something similar to this too.

For a while I would run across the street on my lunch breaks to visit the doctor in the next building over and get my blood pressure measured. Every time it was about 20 point higher than healthy or where it should have been.

Then I go on my day off and my blood pressure was really healthy and normal. about 10 points below average for my age and weight.

The lesson I learned is that my job raises my blood pressure 20 to 30 points on any given work day. I take Co-q10 and arganine to keep the BP low. Don't really feel much of a difference with the co -q10 alone but the arganine has immediate results in BP reduction for me. I also recommend chamomile.



posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 01:30 PM
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originally posted by: Bloodydagger
My blood pressure is always higher in the doctor's office than it is at home. Why is this?

You could have white coat hypertension. White coat hypertension occurs when the blood pressure readings at your doctor's office are higher than they are in other settings, such as your home. It's called white coat hypertension because the health care professionals who measure your blood pressure sometimes wear white coats. It was thought that white coat hypertension was caused by the stress that doctor's appointments can create. Once you'd left the doctor's office, if your blood pressure normalized, the thought was that there wasn't a problem.

SOURCE

This recently happened to me. I hate white rooms and people who dress in all white bother me. I get anxiety when being inside of a room with white walls.

Here is the deal. I went to the Doctor the other day to see about an ear infection that has been throwing me off recently. They took my blood pressure and it was high. 175/90 or so. The doctor stated that my BP was too high. Anyway, I didn't think much of it at the time, I figured hey, I guess I have hypertension too. Well, the Doctor prescribed me with Azithromycin (250MG) and Lisinopril (10MG) - So I took them at about 3pm, went home and I took my blood pressure myself around 7pm. My blood pressure was 123/70 at home......That is a HUGE spread isn't it? This is after just ONE pill. So this means that I was prescribed with a blood pressure med when I didn't have high blood pressure issues at all.

Has anyone else experienced this? Is the white coat disorder a real thing?


First of all people when you think about it logically, of course "white coat" disorder is not literally about the white coats some health practitioners wear. Haha and the "white rooms" as well. You understand it is simply an association creatively chosen by whomever coined the term first. "white coat" is meant to explain the hospital environment in general. Not there "alien mind altering fear inducing lab coats and white paint"... Stop being so anxious about life and chill sir.

lets see what Wiki has to say... ohh a shorter more concise version of my comment nice.

White coat hypertension

White coat hypertension, more commonly known as white coat syndrome, is a phenomenon in which patients exhibit elevated blood pressure in a clinical setting but not in other settings.[1] It is believed that this is due to the anxiety some people experience during a clinic visit.



posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: MConnalley

Every disorder was "coined" by someone though. They all have an origin point. It just depends on which disorders someone see's as self induced and not being a real thing.

Anxiety disorder is real though. It runs in families. It runs in my family (especially my moms side)

So telling someone with anxiety issues to "chill" is easier said than done.

Someone will truly never understand unless they were hit with a full blown anxiety attack themselves.



posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 07:48 PM
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originally posted by: Bloodydagger

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: Bloodydagger

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
a reply to: Bloodydagger

What you have presented is not evidence you do not have hypertension. That would require you to take the reading at home without medication.


But will a single pill (10MG) bring your BP down from 175ish all the way down to 123? This was over a span of 4 hours.

I wasn't taking anything prior to that.

It really depends on exactly what you are taking. It's possible the result you noticed is from either option, or a combination of the two. I was not saying your claim is untrue, only that the method you used to test it was faulty and is unable to show you the cause. May I ask what medication/dosage you were prescribed?

I would recommend you monitor your BP before taking more medication, especially because if your BP is normal you could create a problem by lowering it too far. If you notice your BP is perfect for the next week or two with no medication taken it's safe to assume you have no problem.


I stated what I was taking and how many MG.

My mistake I did not see it.

Azithromycin 250mg: Do you have an infection? That's an antibiotic for a bacterial infection. Mixing antibiotics with blood pressure medications can be harmful (although not necessarily, usually in the elderly), Azithromycin is the safer alternative.

Lisinopril 10mg: It's an ACE inhibitor for various things, commonly high blood pressure. It works quickly and yes can definitely have an impact in a few hours. I think the Dr. was irresponsible for his diagnosis, and you should definitely check your BP off medication at home. I recommend Q8 hours 3 times a day for a week or two. I also recommend you take it orthostatic, so first sitting, then stand for 3 minutes, and recheck. Take it before meals, not after.

Keep a record of all readings and submit them and advocate to have the diagnosis removed if it's inaccurate. It could lead to treatment errors further down the road. If you have any questions feel free to message me.
edit on 21-2-2015 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2015 @ 08:07 PM
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originally posted by: RobinB022

originally posted by: Bloodydagger

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: Bloodydagger

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
a reply to: Bloodydagger

What you have presented is not evidence you do not have hypertension. That would require you to take the reading at home without medication.


But will a single pill (10MG) bring your BP down from 175ish all the way down to 123? This was over a span of 4 hours.

I wasn't taking anything prior to that.

It really depends on exactly what you are taking. It's possible the result you noticed is from either option, or a combination of the two. I was not saying your claim is untrue, only that the method you used to test it was faulty and is unable to show you the cause. May I ask what medication/dosage you were prescribed?

I would recommend you monitor your BP before taking more medication, especially because if your BP is normal you could create a problem by lowering it too far. If you notice your BP is perfect for the next week or two with no medication taken it's safe to assume you have no problem.


I stated what I was taking and how many MG.


I agree with OccamsRazor04.
_____________________________________
I don't think it wise to add a medication to your system, especially one with such bad side effects, unless absolutely necessary. It's also possible that contributing factors may have played a part in your elevated BP.

It's important to note that many Drs are prescribing medications that might not even be needed. I think they should use more caution than they do when Rx'ing these meds with what can be horrible side effects.

As an example, I was recently DX'ed with Diabetes and am now taking Metformin (2000mg per day). I'm taking it because my glucose measured 401. However, because Metformin can cause high blood pressure (according to my Dr), I was RX'ed two other meds along with it; LISINOPRIL 2.5mg, and ATORVASTATIN CALCIUM 40mg. These meds have some nasty side effects, not to mention I'm already taking medications for other ailments.

White coat syndrome can effect your BP, but so does anxiety, pain, stress, etc., and many people get stressed out by appts. anyway, not to mention traffic, waiting in waiting room, and other factors.

If you think that your BP is related to white coat syndrome, it makes sense to me that a person be certain before starting a BP med on a regular basis, but of course.. you can't really take medical advice from random online people either. Those offering opinions though, with ideas that you can check for yourself and might save both money and health-well, makes sense to me, but maybe talk to your Dr first.


About seven months back exactly the same thing happened to me, the Doc treated me for High blood pressure,Diabetes and prescribed, statins and aspirin and Metformin plus the BP>pills. I had a really bad boil at the time. After reading about the side effects , and the fact that most progress from Metformin to insulin, and that the statins will give 50% glaucoma, within two years. I came across a study done by Arizona state University that concluded that Apple cider vinegar was as good if not better for lowering Blood Glucose than Metformin. So I did the whole lot, by taking the vinegar two caps with every meal, gave up Dairy as this is the main fat that covers the pancreas, and blocks the arteries. Now my fasting Blood sugar is normal and my blood pressure is 117/ 75. It was 180/85. I didn't knock off the dairy until about a month on the vinegar, their was small weight loss, but after the knocking off all Dairy the weight fell off and stabilised at the same, I was when I was about twenty . The vinegar flushes the fat out as well.



posted on Feb, 22 2015 @ 02:42 AM
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I have white coat syndrome. I told the dr. but she didn't believe me
and she was so adamant that I be put on medicine to bring my bp down.
I told her I had white coat syndrome and that I refused to be put on
medicine for high bp and made a deal with her. I would take my bp
at home several times a day for a week and if my bp was high I had
no problem taking meds to lower it. I brought her the results
and she was satisfied that I didn't have high bp and she dropped
the subject.
edit on 22-2-2015 by virraszto because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2015 @ 10:05 PM
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I was diagnosed with this white coat syndrome. It took a long time, and multiple specialist appointments to confirm this condition, but basically when I'm in the presence of a doctor, I get nervous for no apparent reason.

The way this was diagnosed is by having a blood pressure monitor attached to my arm and the doctor set it to record multiple readings over a 10 minute period while he was out of the room. The beginning readings showed that I should be dead or having a heart attack, but then as I calmed down (while alone in the room), the numbers came down and eventually dropped to low blood pressure numbers. The overall average was normal. Basically now when I have my annual physical, my GP does this exact process to determine my BP is normal....just not the first 3-4 readings.

I also monitor my BP at home and sure enough the readings are 99% normal....if I am sick or have a headache, they are higher, but never as high as in the doctors office during the first few readings.

I know high blood pressure is a serious and silent killer, but I also think doctors are too quick to prescribe medication when someone has a high reading. Averages over a period of time are best as readings fluctuate throughout the day.



posted on Feb, 23 2015 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: Bloodydagger

Research into colloidal silver, Ear drop bottle, and try to PH your body to 7.4 alkaline. The the crap we eat and drink from unnatural foods and drink lowers are PH levels to acidity and thats when your conditions get worse and your body can't fight off the cancers and other ailneses.



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 05:03 PM
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My blood pressure is all over the map at any given time and after many years of lots and lots of doctor appointments I feel I can add a bit to this thread.
First is those auto blood pressure cuffs suck big time and never read me right. Second was already mentioned in this thread and that is have both arms done not just one. I am averaging about 14 appointments a year with various doctors and specialists and you would think I would be used to it.

Not so, I too suffer from the nasty "White Coat" syndrome and it usually starts when they put me in a exam room or even worse a operating room. The only time I feel truly relaxed is with my GP, after that I get tensed up pretty good when strangers start poking and prodding me.
I have to agree with another poster that mentioned breath in and out deeply and slowly...it helps to a point I find.

I can't find fault in anyone whom dislikes being in a medical center for any reason, it is sure not happy times even for a check up.
S&F
Regards, Iwinder
edit on 24-2-2015 by Iwinder because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2015 @ 05:06 PM
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Wow, that happened to me and my doctor wanted several more visits and BP checks to make sure it wasn't just a one time thing before throwing medication at me.



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