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Android malware spies on you even after phone is shut down!

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posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 10:56 PM
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Pretty crazy stuff new malware can spy on you even when your phone is shut off, including access to camera use!




A particularly devious new Android malware can make calls or take photos even if you shut the device down, according to security research firm AVG.


Source: mashable.com...




posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 11:08 PM
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a reply to: LongishLongo

Well, if my phone is off, that means it's not in use and it's probably laying on my desk or in my pocket.
Should anyone happen to be spying on me, I hope they get a kick out of looking at the ceiling or a pocket full of lent.



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 12:00 AM
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a reply to: LongishLongo

This has been known for a while

NSA has a backdoor to everything, what small time criminals do is way smaller and simpler in comparison
edit on 20-2-2015 by PizzaAnyday505 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 12:59 AM
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The NSA has access to pretty much anything.. THAT has been known. But some random hacker using malware, that could be a child molestor, or anything, is a rotally different ball game if they were to use it in this fashion.
a reply to: PizzaAnyday505



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 01:12 AM
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a reply to: LongishLongo

Android malware spies on you even after phone is shut down! And often times shuts your phone off just to piss you off. And for all we know creates auto-updates to install other malware at specific times whilst watching you. Possibly programs that turn your phone into a negative frequency-generator.

All speculation - but something to think about! LOL



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 02:20 AM
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One, the user had to manually root the phone
Two, the user then had to install the infected app

Three, the user then gave infected app root permission.

First off, most users dont root, and would be intrinsically safe. If that fails, most rooted users are smart enough not to give random apps permissions required for this.

You show me a rooted OS, and I'll show you a device vulnerable to attack.


(Comment section from OPs link.) Mashable



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 05:52 AM
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originally posted by: AreUKiddingMe

One, the user had to manually root the phone
Two, the user then had to install the infected app

Three, the user then gave infected app root permission.

First off, most users dont root, and would be intrinsically safe. If that fails, most rooted users are smart enough not to give random apps permissions required for this.

You show me a rooted OS, and I'll show you a device vulnerable to attack.


(Comment section from OPs link.) Mashable


I admit to not even knowing what "root" means in cell phone jargon. What I do know is the same thing I reported on ATS about a year ago and never had seen an "expert" reporting upon before that time.

As the owner of a new smartphone, I wanted a couple of simple apps. One was a flashlight. I downloaded it for free, and on a whim, decided to read the fine print that most of us never read in regard to anything. This is because such lengthy statements are tailored in legalese language to bore the reader. Buried in the fine print of this free app was the clear statement that I was giving the owners of the app permission to turn my phone and light on at any time even when it was off and not notify me that they were doing so. My guess is this is the reason why there are hundreds of free apps for flashlight, compasses, etc. Those handy "gifts" has a dark side that goes beyond any voyeurism of a common app programer.

In short, I was agreeing to take on spyware simply by clicking "accept." To imply that other actions must be involved to infect your phone is totally crazy.



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 11:34 AM
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Raise your hand if you're surprised by any of this.

They control corporations, by the balls.

It's really pretty sick when you think about it-

On one side,the corporations use huge money to sway the government into allowing laws and regulations that lead corporations to more profits- in effect, you can "invest" money into government, and get your investment back ten fold with new regulations forcing the population to feed the corporations.

Then, on the other side, the government has regulations that force the corporations to hand over anything the government wants, and there's nothing the corporation can do.

Me, I work in the field- I see what's happening, and fortunately it's not touching me directly. At least not yet.
But the government could show up in my home, after hours, and demand that I hand over access to any number of systems, data, encryption keys, etc that I have- and they can legally execute me if I tell anyone what they've gotten from me.

Now imagine you're a company who thrives on security. Say you're an employee who works at GeoTrust.
If you don't know who GeoTrust is, or what they do, you should look into it.
Our wonderful NSA can now go into the home of employee X at geotrust and demand their credentials- and there's nothing that person can do. The NSA can go to geotrust headquarters and demand private keys of every SSL cert they've ever handed out, and GeoTrust can't even tell their clients that their SSL certificates are compromised.

Big clients- like Visa.

Now apply that same logic to a company like Texas Instruments. National Semiconductor. Intel. Samsung. Qualcomm. Broadcom.
Technology has been tainted.


If you're surprised that your phone can do these things even when "off", you don't know how far out of hand this whole thing has gotten.







 
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