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Tropopause drops to 7500 feet over Cincinatti

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posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:05 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: kosmicjack

The stable climate is essentially a gift from the universe. My current opinion is that we are about to hit an ice age.

I've been watching the winter temperatures all year this year. So far all winter its been warmer in Alaska then it's been in Pennsylvania. What am i talking about?

source



Siberia enjoys a well-deserved reputation as one of the coldest places on Earth. But the last time the planet got really cold, Siberia apparently didn't go along for the ride, providing animals a warm oasis from the Ice Age


During the last glacial period the Siberian tundra was actually a haven for wildlife. Weird right? It wasn't until the cataclysmic event at the end of the younger dryas that the climate changed in that region. On top of that the human population is experiencing lower birthrates.

Thanks for the thread Kosmic i was about to put a thread together about the coming glacial period.


As a matter of fact, it takes a lot longer. In fact, we are in the middle of a transition to an Ice age now!

What is an ice age? An ice age is a long interval of time (millions to tens of millions of years) when global temperatures are relatively cold and large areas of the Earth are covered by continental ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Within an ice age are multiple shorter-term periods of warmer temperatures when glaciers retreat (called interglacials or interglacial cycles) and colder temperatures when glaciers advance (called glacials or glacial cycles).

At least five major ice ages have occurred throughout Earth’s history: the earliest was over 2 billion years ago, and the most recent one began approximately 3 million years ago and continues today (yes, we live in an ice age!).

geology.utah.gov...




posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:06 PM
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Very informative thread and thank you Kosmicjack for taking the time to research and post. I wonder if that would hinder air travel as in icing problems?
I can tell you that in Ontario it's a bitchy cold winter and identical to last years winter as well. No melts and all the snow that has fallen to date is now solid ice.

Last year was a record for the most ice coverage on the Great Lakes and it looks like it will be a repeat this year from what I can gather.
www.glerl.noaa.gov...
www.washingtonpost.com...
Our long term forecast is cold cold cold till at least the first week in March. We have cooler summers now, and last year was the end of us trying to grow tomatoes. I don't know if its the weather or the ice on the Lakes or both but we do live right on Lake Huron ( A couple of good one wood hits away)

Last summer Lake Huron was basically too cold to enjoy a long swim. It's been two years now that we even dared to put out our semi tropical plants on the deck for the summer.

I do know that the reason for this cold weather is a High Pressure center over the west coast that is supposed to last for quite some time.

www.lfpress.com...

I sure hope the tropopause goes way back up where it should be, but it is worrisome that you could only find two other examples of this happening.

Regards, Iwinder
edit on 19-2-2015 by Iwinder because: (no reason given)

edit on 19-2-2015 by Iwinder because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:08 PM
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a reply to: thesmokingman

No your not up to date on your info sorry.



Previous evidence from Greenland ice samples had suggested this abrupt shift in climate happened over the span of a decade or so. Now researchers say it surprisingly may have taken place over the course of a few months, or a year or two at most.


source



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:08 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Aren't we still in the last ice age as there is still ice at the poles?

Isn't it called a glacial period when it moves further towrds the equator?

I'm sure that's what I was taught in school......could be wrong.

Google time....lol.

EDIT:

By this definition, we are in an interglacial period—the holocene—of the ice age that began 2.6 million years ago at the start of the Pleistocene epoch, because the Greenland, Arctic, and Antarctic ice sheets still exist.


Sorry, this is what I was thinking of, should have googled first. We still have the remnants of the last ice age.
edit on 19/2/15 by woogleuk because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:12 PM
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a reply to: Iwinder

Well...to be fair - there may be more and I just don't know where to look.
Or, it my happen quite frequently but is just not coincidentally documented.


Dunno.

But it at least happens frequently enough that they know it's associated with certain atmospheric conditions.

And, TBH, my geeky fascination with this phenomenon is exactly what the antediluvian referenced on the first page. Is this the sort of odd planetary force that might flash freeze a mammoth?
edit on 2/19/2015 by kosmicjack because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:15 PM
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Florida is going to be in freezing temperatures for petes sake...a reply to: Blaine91555


edit on 19-2-2015 by ATF1886 because: misspelling



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:15 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: thesmokingman

No your not up to date on your info sorry.



Previous evidence from Greenland ice samples had suggested this abrupt shift in climate happened over the span of a decade or so. Now researchers say it surprisingly may have taken place over the course of a few months, or a year or two at most.


source

You mean the Utah Geology Survey and its scientists are wrong? As opposed to what? Some researchers with a theory?
Its not MY information, I am not a scientist, so I will just go ahead and take these guys word for it...



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:16 PM
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a reply to: thesmokingman

Do more research your wrong your perspective is wrong.



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:17 PM
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originally posted by: ATF1886
Florida isbgping to be in freezing temperatures for petes sake...a reply to: Blaine91555



State Temp. °F Temp. °C Date Station
Florida –2 –19 Feb. 13, 1899 Tallahassee

www.google.com...=coldest%20temp%20in%20florida%20ever&es_ th=1
Here is my proof of what I said previously.



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:17 PM
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I came across this a couple of days ago...it may have a relationship to this subject:




Bad news for warmists: Sun has entered 'weakest solar cycle in a century'





…if history is a guide, it is safe to say that weak solar activity for a prolonged period of time can have a negative impact on global temperatures in the troposphere which is the bottom-most layer of Earth’s atmosphere - and where we all live.

There have been two notable historical periods with decades-long episodes of low solar activity. The first period is known as the “Maunder Minimum”, named after the solar astronomer Edward Maunder, and it lasted from around 1645 to 1715.

The second one is referred to as the “Dalton Minimum”, named for the English meteorologist John Dalton, and it lasted from about 1790 to 1830. Both of these historical periods coincided with below-normal global temperatures in an era now referred to by many as the “Little Ice Age”.

In addition, research studies in just the past couple of decades have found a complicated relationship between solar activity, cosmic rays, and clouds on Earth.

This research suggests that in times of low solar activity where solar winds are typically weak; more cosmic rays reach the Earth’s atmosphere which, in turn, has been found to lead to an increase in certain types of clouds that can act to cool the Earth.




www.americanthinker.com...
edit on 19-2-2015 by IAMTAT because: title added



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:18 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: thesmokingman

Do more research your wrong your perspective is wrong.

Prove me wrong.....I will wait................


+7 more 
posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:19 PM
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a reply to: kosmicjack

The tropopause is, by definition, the point in the atmosphere at which temperature stops decreasing with altitude and this “lapse rate” inverts (temp begins increasing with altitude).

This will technically happen at the edge of a polar front because the cold Arctic air will sink as it meets the warmer mid-latitude air and thus create a temperature inversion in the vertical profile. You can see it in the diagram from the Wikipedia link in the OP (red line between Polar Cell and Ferrel Cell):



From what I can tell all that happened here is a weather balloon crossed this threshold from cold polar air to warmer mid-latitude air at 7500 feet and thus recorded the “tropopause” at this height.

Not really a big deal. But it’s nice to see some people taking a pro-active approach to trying to understand such phenomena better than just screaming doom porn.

For what it's worth here’s a good resource on climate change and meandering jet stream/polar fronts:
A Rough Guide to the Jet Stream: what it is, how it works and how it is responding to enhanced Arctic warming



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:23 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I had to check Greenland's ice sheet melt because of that link, but have nothing to say on that topic, as i'm not able to judge anything from it because of lack of knowledge.

Here is the link though, if anyone should be interested.

2014 melt season in review
edit on 19-2-2015 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:23 PM
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a reply to: thesmokingman

UGHHHHHHHHHhhhhhh. Fine.

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One of the most surprising findings was that the shifts from cold stadials to the warm interstadial intervals occurred in a matter of decades, with air temperatures over Greenland rapidly warming 8 to 15°C (Huber et al. 2006). Furthermore, the cooling occurred much more gradually, giving these events a saw-tooth shape in climate records from most of the Northern Hemisphere (Figure 1).


source


During the last ice age, over 20 abrupt and dramatic climate shifts occurred that are particularly prominent in records around the northern Atlantic (see Section 6.4).


ABRUPT key word.



These differ from the gla - cial-interglacial cycles in that they probably do not involve large changes in global mean temperature: changes are not synchro - nous in Greenland and Antarctica, and they are in the opposite direction in the South and North Atlantic.


Massive swings and polarization. Some part of the world are very conducive to life while others are under miles of ice.

Do i need to continue?



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:23 PM
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a reply to: mc_squared

Thanks!

Given that very reasonable explanation, it seems odd to me that NWS Boston tweeted that out with very litle context.



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:25 PM
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posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:28 PM
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a reply to: thesmokingman



The most spectacular aspect of the YD is that it ended extremely abruptly (around 11,600 years ago), and although the date cannot be known exactly, it is estimated from the annually-banded Greenland ice-core that the annual-mean temperature increased by as much as 10°C in 10 years


Abrupt. Changes happening in as short as a month.



The example of such a "mega-drought" and its dire consequences is particularly revealing of the vulnerability of complex societies to abrupt changes in our current climate, often believed to be much more stable than that of the "glacial world". From Panel A in figure 5, one would think that the last 11,000 years have been rather uneventful, and this is quite true in terms of temperature changes in Greenland. However, we see here that this did not preclude marked, regional changes in precipitation spanning entire decades, or even centuries in this case.


Think about the draught the US is experiencing as well as the decline in birthrate.

I do my research.

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posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:30 PM
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a reply to: onequestion




Greenland rapidly warming 8 to 15°C (Huber et al. 2006

You consider that temp. change an "ice age"?



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: thesmokingman

Read the information for yourself.



posted on Feb, 19 2015 @ 05:36 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: thesmokingman

Read the information for yourself.

I did, and it is not even close to relevant. Im not going to argue with you.....



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