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Russian - UK 'Airspace Games...'

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posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 02:46 PM
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a reply to: ukmicky1980

That looks like it. There's a great picture from the Swiss intercept too.




posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: ukmicky1980

Holy cow that would freak me right the heck out. I really admire the nerves of the pilots here. I'd be shaking like a leaf.



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 02:51 PM
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a reply to: ScientificRailgun

During the 80s the Russian tail gunners would hold up signs with their phone numbers to US fighter crews. Sometimes they'd both take adult magazines and trade centerfolds as they flew next to each other.



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

That is equally awesome and hilarious.



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 03:10 PM
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a reply ScientificRailgun

It was almost a game back then. There's an awesome picture that almost no one has seen outside military folks of an F-14 that had intercepted a Tu-95 near their carrier group.

What makes it so awesome is the RIO is sitting in the back seat looking right at the camera, wearing a gorilla mask. The pilot is in front like it happened every day.



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I need that picture in my life. Oh god I am actually laughing out loud.

Is there anyone that has this, or is it relegated to hushed drinking stories between old pilots?



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 03:15 PM
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a reply to: ScientificRailgun

Sadly about the only copies left are in the squadron in question and the pilots involved collections. I've been looking for a copy myself. I used to have one but it was with all my patches and other pictures I lost.
edit on 2/20/2015 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 03:26 PM
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posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 03:29 PM
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a reply to: sg1642

And that is why it's in the news.



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 03:35 PM
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a reply to: sg1642

I agree completely, we have some of the best equipment in the world and some of the best trained personnel in the world, but, like the article says, its a numbers game.

On the question of these fly-bys being designed to test response times etc..

Wouldn't the RAF deliberately NOT get there as fast as possible? in order to give the Russians a false response time, when in fact they are capable of intercepting much quicker?

And if they're scanning/ recording radio frequencies etc... wouldn't they be changed routinely to counter this sort of thing?



edit on 2/20/2015 by ukmicky1980 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 03:41 PM
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originally posted by: ukmicky1980
a reply to: sg1642

I agree completely, we have some of the best equipment in the world and some of the best trained personnel in the world, but, like the article says, its a numbers game.

On the question of these fly-bys being designed to test response times etc..

Wouldn't the RAF deliberately NOT get there as fast as possible? in order to give the Russians a false response time, when in fact they are capable of intercepting much quicker?

And if they're scanning/ recording radio frequencies etc... wouldn't they be changed routinely to counter this sort of thing?


you'll always play dumb where possible but on this occasion it would be better to be as sharp as possible I'd imagine. With regards to comms etc I'm not so sure about in the air Zaphod is the man to ask but that's what happens on the ground.



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 03:41 PM
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a reply to: ukmicky1980

It's all part of the game. The longer you give them without an escort the longer they have to do what they want. What if this is the time they launch high speed cruise missiles?

As for radio, do you constantly change frequencies, giving away what frequencies your equipment can operate on, and what frequencies to jam? Or do you use the same ones regularly, and then change them in a real situation and make them hunt for the new ones?



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 04:15 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: ukmicky1980

It's all part of the game. The longer you give them without an escort the longer they have to do what they want. What if this is the time they launch high speed cruise missiles?

As for radio, do you constantly change frequencies, giving away what frequencies your equipment can operate on, and what frequencies to jam? Or do you use the same ones regularly, and then change them in a real situation and make them hunt for the new ones?
we should attempt an intercept with a Spitfire next time for #s and giggles.



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 04:17 PM
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a reply to: sg1642

Now that I'd pay money to see.



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 04:27 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: sg1642

Now that I'd pay money to see.


I can see the headlines now. 'Russians intrude British Airspace with vintage il-2 aircraft'



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 05:46 PM
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posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 05:51 PM
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posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 05:56 PM
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posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 05:57 PM
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a reply to: ukmicky1980

The woman in the Guardian article hasn't a clue what she is talking about. She seriously needs to get acquainted with an aircraft recognition book. Is it any wonder that the Guardian is laughed at!

The two Tu-95MS Bear Hs were positively identified by the RAF Typhoon pilots and shadowed during their entire flight near the periphery of UK airspace. They did not go inside the 12 nautical mile limit. The supporting RAF tanker was visible on Flight Radar 24 for its entire mission up and down the length of the UK.

RAF Typhoons identified the two Tu-95s on 18/2/15 as serials RF-94130 and RF-94116.

See following for details and HF Voice audio recording from one of the Tu-95MS. The recent Russian Tu-95MS Bear H missions have provided radio enthusiasts with some interesting comms activity on High Frequency. The Russians still employ Morse and Voice on these missions. The Russian bomber/tanker nets were active from 0700 GMT on the 18th February using Morse and Voice comms.

planesandstuff.wordpress.com...

I made one HF Voice recording during the evening of the 18th Feb. The following is two IL-78M Midas refueling tankers as they supported the homeward leg of the Tu-95 Bears.

soundcloud.com...

Radio op station of a Tu-95MS Bear H. Note the Morse Key in the corner. The radios are set on 8909 Kilohertz which is the Summer HF Voice frequency.

www.airliners.net...

The following is an excellent link for those interested in monitoring the Russian bomber flights on HF.

planesandstuff.wordpress.com...



posted on Feb, 20 2015 @ 05:57 PM
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