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The Dark World of Greyhound Racing

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posted on Feb, 18 2015 @ 01:31 PM

originally posted by: Maxatoria
I know in the UK it used to be a common practice to catch a ferry to Northern Ireland and midway just chuck the unwanted dogs who were too old to race etc over the side as it was cheaper than paying for a vet to put them out of their misery but now theres more rescue charities around its died off now they can palm them off for no cost at all

Yeah, that's the biggest problem in the American industry is the discarding of unwanted animals. But as you said, more charities are working hard to adopt out the retired animals, so the practice is fading.

On it's face, there is nothing wrong with racing a dog or horse. It's what the animals were designed by birth to do and they take great joy in it. It's when the element of human greed gets involved that the problems creep in. We corrupt something that should be beautiful and joyful and a clean competition.

posted on Feb, 18 2015 @ 02:08 PM
a reply to: SubTruth

Dog,Horse racing....Bull fighting are all forms of animal cruelty in my book.

Neither dog racing or horse racing are cruel.

The animals involved in them truly enjoy doing it....but that doesn't detract from the fact that some people involved in the sports engage in some cruel practices in their pursuit of them.

The vast majority of dog and horse owners and trainers involved in the sports truly love their animals and treat them with the utmost care and attention.
The unscrupulous ones need rooting out and should be punished in accordance with the law in addition to being banned from having any future involvement or connection with the respective sport.

Here in the UK there simply are too many racehorses racing for at times relatively pitiful prize money.
Many of these 'mediocre' and 'poor' horses are indeed treat poorly and have a less than ideal existence when their careers are over.

Exactly the same can be said about dog racing.

A few years ago a man was fined the paltry sum of £2000 for killing literally thousands of greyhounds who despite being healthy were deemed too old to race anymore.

I do not for one minute think this was a unique, one-off operation and suspect it may be a relatively common practice.
This is totally unacceptable.

The sports in themselves are not cruel - animals love running and racing - and we should not taint everyone involved in them with the same brush, but more could and should be done to eliminate some of the cruel practices associated with the sports.

posted on Feb, 18 2015 @ 02:49 PM

originally posted by: Kryties
a reply to: bellagirl

Yeah unfortunately corruption pays.

You can tell when the Dogs line up to go into the boxes, some are just not happy and some seem ok. Their certainly has to be far more oversight in this industry than their currently is. A scandal breaks now and then , which simply goes off the radar . The last thing I heard was that they were rubbing coc aine into their mouths before a race. Giving them water to slow them down so the price would go up until they would win at a stupid price. Any sport that is using animals for profit, has to have independent full time inspectors with power to back up the legislation . If your in the industry you sign a waver that lets the inspector come on to your premises any time of the day or night. It could be argued the same must apply to human exploitation.

posted on Feb, 18 2015 @ 03:03 PM
a reply to: Chadwickus

The world of greyhound racing has always been known to have this dark side. It's quite disgusting. I've heard of atrocities in Spain to the Galgos, to greyhounds in the US, Ireland and other places. It's a horrible sport and though it showcases the innate talent and abilities of the dogs involved, I don't see any redeeming value in it.

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