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Coral Castle Mystery 100% Solved with 1930's Film Footage!

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posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 12:05 PM
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originally posted by: Develo

originally posted by: luthier
I have no problem with leverage to build structures what i have a problem with or cant understand (i am a guitarbuilder and carpenter) is how the ancients cut the massive stones without metal or with soft alloys.



Dear monsieur le luthier, a quick internet search could answer all your questions


First, the use of metal is quite old and roughly coincides with the erection of massive stone structures.

Secondly, other methods exist like the use of hammerstones and abrasion techniques.

For example this article will introduce you to the methods used by the Egyptians:
www.reshafim.org.il...


When you can have all the knowledge in the world so easily, why not looking for it instead of remaining puzzled?


Well because i minored in anthropology and took actual classes. The building of stone temples does not coincide in anyway universally with metal tools. In fact we discover older temples every decade and since i went to college the age in which man became civilized has changed by about 4000 years. Adams calender for instance is questionably built during a time when men where still in caves in europe. The structures in turkey go back 11,000 years. Thats the stone age (9,000 bce). Ths beginning of the bronze age had very soft metal tools. Personally i dont believe our history is so linear and massive catastrophic events pushed us back a few times. But according to the internet or archeology there are several sites that predate what we consider to be the advent of metal tools. But then again you could do a quick internet search to find that out.
Fyi I layed a limestone vaneer around my entire home, have cut granite with a diamond blade, and poured lots of concrete in my lifetime so i am no stranger to any of this topic in the real world.
edit on 17-2-2015 by luthier because: edit

edit on 17-2-2015 by luthier because: spl




posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 12:13 PM
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There have always been very inventive people. I remember reading an history magazine and the craftiness of our forefathers is evident. In one case, I'm amazing at something. A guy wanted to speed up the rate they were making cheese because it was a lot of work. This was in the 1870's about, btw. He started out with a wheel and a dog. The dog would walk the wheel to turn something which would stir something else. Soon they could see it wouldn't work. He set out to make larger wheels and different configurations after that. Eventually it all settled onto a 30-foot wheel which was wide enough to hold a couple big dogs. Of course, with the invention of machines and large processing plants his efforts were mute, but still, for a homesteader family, it's amazing in my mind. I've also read about homesteaders putting up water wheels to power their lighting.

A lot of people underestimate the innovativeness of homesteaders. It's repeated they only have a few years of schooling, so were dumb. This is not true. Their smartness came from practical things, not from books.

I think if one examine the tribes which live primitely one will find similar feats of the human mind which're continually underappreciated. Truth is, survivors of the natural are educated in survival. They don't sport a PHD, but they know how to survive without modern technology which is not something can be said about most of us.

I've also read about was it the Romans (or the Greeks) who mined using some ingenious techniques which I couldn't repeat if I had to. I'm around average or so, but I figure many couldn't either. They could do a lot back then. There were powered saw mills over a thousand years ago. They were grinding grains and cutting wood with windmills almost as long ago.

I'm a tech lover. I love computers and software-related things. I've always been avid science fiction reader. My head couldn't be more in the clouds versus most others. Yet I have to bow my head to people around hte world today and years past who don't need spaceships or nanobots or AI or any of hte other things which usually entertain me. In my mind, these people, as well as people who must have lived thousands of years ago, put me to shame, as I'm awed by what they do with so little.
edit on 17-2-2015 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 12:25 PM
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a reply to: luthier

You would have noticed then that I mentionned other techniques existed before the widespread use of metal, like abrasion, hammerstones or the use of wooden pegs expanding when water was poured on them?



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 12:27 PM
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originally posted by: jonnywhite
There have always been very inventive people. I remember reading an history magazine and the craftiness of our forefathers is evident. In one case, I'm amazing at something. A guy wanted to speed up the rate they were making cheese because it was a lot of work. This was in the 1870's about, btw. He started out with a wheel and a dog. The dog would walk the wheel to turn something which would stir something else. Soon they could see it wouldn't work. He set out to make larger wheels and different configurations after that. Eventually it all settled onto a 30-foot wheel which was wide enough to hold a couple big dogs. Of course, with the invention of machines and large processing plants his efforts were mute, but still, for a homesteader family, it's amazing in my mind. I've also read about homesteaders putting up water wheels to power their lighting.

A lot of people underestimate the innovativeness of homesteaders. It's repeated they only have a few years of schooling, so were dumb. This is not true. Their smartness came from practical things, not from books.

I think if one examine the tribes which live primitely one will find similar feats of the human mind which're continually underappreciated. Truth is, survivors of the natural are educated in survival. They don't sport a PHD, but they know how to survive without modern technology which is not something can be said about most of us.

I've also read about was it the Romans (or the Greeks) who mined using some impressive techniques. They could do a lot back then. There were powered saw mills over a thousand years ago. They were grinding grains and cutting wood with windmills almost as long ago.


Absolutely! The current indigenous who still live traditionally are the equivalent of human tanks. Rock hard, tough, and completely adapted to their environment and par with their regional educational level with some excelling in certain areas. They have a great immune system (acclimated to their region, vulnerable to outside disease.)

Sadly humanity is all being homogenized through Western/capitalist/whatever/greed and so many other issues.. it's nice to have the internet and still connect.



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 12:36 PM
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originally posted by: St Udio


it is strange indeed that every piece of work he did was a successful job
no breakage...



Why ever would you think that?



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 12:45 PM
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originally posted by: Develo
a reply to: luthier

You would have noticed then that I mentionned other techniques existed before the widespread use of metal, like abrasion, hammerstones or the use of wooden pegs expanding when water was poured on them?




Right. You do understand the sites I am speaking of have carvings right? Not only that but the organiztion level of stone age people anthropologically speaking is assumed to not have that sophistication. Also the techniques you speak of for the pyramids are hypothisis only since at least for the great pyramids no blue prints were found. Is it most likely yes because there is evidence even after the stone age of these techniques. But in Science you can not simply state this how it was done without empirical evidence (like there is here in this amazing video). Unless you can point me towards a definitive source, reviewed by peers that the great pyramid was built in this way its just speculation based on what we know from the blueprints of the more modern pyramids.



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 12:50 PM
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originally posted by: jonnywhiteA guy wanted to speed up the rate they were making cheese because it was a lot of work. This was in the 1870's about, btw. He started out with a wheel and a dog. The dog would walk the wheel to turn something which would stir something else. Soon they could see it wouldn't work. He set out to make larger wheels and different configurations after that. Eventually it all settled onto a 30-foot wheel which was wide enough to hold a couple big dogs.


There used to be a dog breed especially for doing this sort of thing - they've been around (along with the basic idea) since before the 1500's.

The Turnspit Dog



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 01:20 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Nice!

I could make a case about history is full of advanced bio robots, capable of doing all kinds of different tasks and operating on left overs and capable of reproducing itself.

Not kidding.. If i see bio- and or soft robotica... I sometimes wonder if the end result will be an animal or even human.



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 01:36 PM
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I agree that sheer determination is how a lot of monumental feats were accomplished. There are other structures claimed to have been built with advanced technology or even by aliens, but those who believe these things overlook the fact that humans can display an ingenuity and drive that can accomplish a wide host of things. The pyramids for instance. The blocks were heavy and their technology was not very advanced by our standards, yet with sheer manpower and a little brainpower they were able to stack such large blocks.



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 01:53 PM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: jonnywhiteA guy wanted to speed up the rate they were making cheese because it was a lot of work. This was in the 1870's about, btw. He started out with a wheel and a dog. The dog would walk the wheel to turn something which would stir something else. Soon they could see it wouldn't work. He set out to make larger wheels and different configurations after that. Eventually it all settled onto a 30-foot wheel which was wide enough to hold a couple big dogs.


There used to be a dog breed especially for doing this sort of thing - they've been around (along with the basic idea) since before the 1500's.

The Turnspit Dog


Fascinating read on the turnspit dog. Thanks!



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 02:14 PM
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I don't think Ed himself ever claimed to have special powers. He simply knew the physics and mechanics of moving heavy objects.that being said, it's no less amazing what this little man accomplished alone. I have been there several times and there is one particular block that is just enormous that just takes your breath away as to how he was able to shape and erect it. I have pictures and will post them later.



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: sputniksteve

I used to use turnspit dog as an insult when I was an NCO. I feel you should always be creative with that sort of thing.



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 02:56 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: aboutface
Good time to post this one again.


Cool video but am curious why they felt the need to mention he was white?



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 03:35 PM
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May be a new youtube video but that footage has been around for a long time and is wel known within the followers of Ed.
It not case closed by any means.
No one ever said he didnt use his mechanical pully system to lift the stones. Everyone who is seriously following his story knows he used it to at least lift them. What has always been the question is how he moved them around and positioned them. Its always been pointed out that the box on the top of his pully system has no known purpose.



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 04:02 PM
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originally posted by: luthier
Not only that but the organiztion level of stone age people anthropologically speaking is assumed to not have that sophistication.


I'm surprised to read such a popular misconception from an anthropologist.

All the evidence shows that, as you explained it, at least as early as 13.000 years ago people were already erecting small stone monuments and settling in communities.

You don't need metal to carve out a rock and displace it, the ingenuity of man and a great deal of patience is sufficient.

That modern engineers can't always understand how it was done only shows that our modern techniques aren't as "sophisticated" as we believe. You just need to look at the marvels of antiquity to realize our craftsmen have lost a great deal of their skills and knowledge by relying so much on motorized machinery.
edit on 17-2-2015 by Develo because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 04:15 PM
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a reply to: amy2x

Not solved 100%

What is the black box on the tripod?

How was the structure constructed?

Just having a tripod and a vehicle to move rocks is not !00% solved.

I am quite sure that if you want to prove a theory you will need to duplicate the process and get the same result.

Until then it is speculation of many fronts.

You would need a video that shows every step being done to be !00%



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 04:43 PM
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a reply to: Ksihkehe

Oh, that was done through magnetic telekinesis.



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 05:26 PM
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Wow, after all these years! Finding the truth can be so sobering, like finding how a magician does an illusion. Hats off to that 0.001% who make the important discoveries and drag the rest of us up the ladder with them.
Got to laugh at those still looking for the conspiracy on this one after seeing the video. Great find, case closed.



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 05:31 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: watchitburn
You left out magnetic monopoles.

if you got any; i want 'em.



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 06:07 PM
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originally posted by: deadeyedick
a reply to: amy2x

Not solved 100%

What is the black box on the tripod?

How was the structure constructed?

Just having a tripod and a vehicle to move rocks is not !00% solved.

I am quite sure that if you want to prove a theory you will need to duplicate the process and get the same result.

Until then it is speculation of many fronts.

You would need a video that shows every step being done to be !00%


Did you actually watch the video,from about 3.45 onwards it explains what the 'mysterious' black box was?

I went there last year and the first thing that struck me about it was that it was larger than I was expecting from the photos I'd seen.You have to go there and walk round to really appreciate that all this really was built by just one man.There is film of Ed lifting and moving the blocks by himself,all simple techniques that go back a very long time,why does it need to be proven he could do this? You live in a house made using standard building techniques that have been around for a very long time,do you need a video showing them at work from the very start to the very finish to prove that it was built in the conventional way?

This video fails to mention another use for Ed's genius when he used this Model T Ford axle casing to cook hot dogs in that he sold for 10c a time........




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