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Mars gets hazy!!!

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posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 02:53 PM
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In 2012, Damian Peach captured an image of Mars that initially appeared to be a telescopic problem...what else could explain what he was seeing?
It turns out he was among the firsts to lay eyes on an epic discovery. A plume extending 200 km in the Martian atmosphere. A phenomenon heretonow considered impossible due to Mars is extremely tin atmosphere.
Theories as to its composition range from CO2 gas to liquid water sublimating. Any and all explanations are extremely exciting and humbling as to our understanding of the red planet.

The BBC article is sparse and not scientific but hits the highlights
I am interested in the opinions of the ATS' community. What does this say that we already don't know about our crimson neighbor? Does this change anyone's view on te viability of life existing on what was once considered a dead planet?
BBC Article




posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 03:01 PM
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MMmmmmm, very interesting



maybe a meteorite strike?



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 03:26 PM
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a reply to: Christosterone

I saw that,too.

My (lol) first thought was the end of the Total Recall movie-and Arnold's eyeballs shooting out on stalks.

Maybe an asteroid hit.

Do you know if the Mars rover has any seismic reading equipment?

I'll check-just was wondering if you guys knew off the top of your heads.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: Christosterone

mars farted ...
its a cloud ...
or a creature that exists in a type of ethereal form ...
no .. its a big ghosty ... an alien martian ghost ... yeah ...



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: Christosterone




No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same. No one gave a thought to the older worlds of space as sources of human danger, or thought of them only to dismiss the idea of life upon them as impossible or improbable. It is curious to recall some of the mental habits of those departed days. At most terrestrial men fancied there might be other men upon Mars, perhaps inferior to themselves and ready to welcome a missionary enterprise. Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. And early in the twentieth century came the great disillusionment


H.G. Wells.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 04:15 PM
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I'm a firm believer that Mars has more of an atmosphere than we are being led to believe.

The dust in that picture ought to fall quite rapidly without an atmosphere, does anyone know how long it was there?



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 04:15 PM
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The vast, bright haze lasted for about 10 days. A month later, it reappeared for the same length of time. But it has not been seen since.


That not rule out a meteor strike?



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 04:19 PM
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a reply to: Fisherr

maybe, unless another meteorite hit?

but i do like FalcoFan idea:




posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: Christosterone

The BBC article is sparse and not scientific
It is uncommon for consumer media to get science right. Fortunately, there is a cure for that.
dx.doi.org...


The association with Mars' terminator is interesting. It brings to mind a phenomenon which is thought to occur on the Moon, an electrostatic event caused by sunlight, the lofting of lunar dust to high altitudes. The upper left image of the collage bears a resemblance to sketches made by Apollo astronauts. The authors of the paper don't seem to consider the possibility of something similar while the article linked below suggests that the electrostatic environment of Mars and the Moon may have strong similarities, including the possibility of lofting of dust at the terminator. One thing for sure, Mars is a different planet and there is a lot we don't know about its atmosphere. Much, much more to learn.


iopscience.iop.org...



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk

The dust in that picture ought to fall quite rapidly without an atmosphere, does anyone know how long it was there?
Mars does has an atmosphere.

The plumes have been observed for periods of ten days or longer. What is being observed is not dust, but clouds. Why those clouds form at such high altitudes is the puzzle.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 04:49 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: VoidHawk

The dust in that picture ought to fall quite rapidly without an atmosphere, does anyone know how long it was there?
Mars does has an atmosphere.

The plumes have been observed for periods of ten days or longer. What is being observed is not dust, but clouds. Why those clouds form at such high altitudes is the puzzle.


I know it has an atmosphere, I'm just suspicious as to how dense it is.
Whether dust or clouds its still particulate, and if the atmosphere were very thin those clouds/dust ought to fall rapidly.
I notice someone above has said that they lasted for 10 days. The tops of the clouds/dust look like they are very high, if the atmosphere is so thin then what is supporting them? Gravity ought to be pulling them back to mars.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 04:54 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk

The tops of the clouds/dust look like they are very high, if the atmosphere is so thin then what is supporting them?
What "supports" cirrus clouds? Does gravity pull them back to Earth?

What "supports" mesospheric clouds high in Earth's atmosphere? Not much of an atmosphere up there either. They're a bit of a mystery as well.

en.wikipedia.org.../File:Iss017e011632.jpg



edit on 2/16/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 04:58 PM
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originally posted by: FalcoFan My (lol) first thought was the end of the Total Recall movie-and Arnold's eyeballs shooting out on stalks.


that scene was awesome



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 05:01 PM
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originally posted by: VoidHawk
I'm a firm believer that Mars has more of an atmosphere than we are being led to believe.

The dust in that picture ought to fall quite rapidly without an atmosphere, does anyone know how long it was there?


I totally concur, if the atmosphere of mars is a hundredth that of earth then a parachute wouldn't do much to break the decent of the lander . Clouds have been observed around Olympus Mons. maybe that's another thing they aren't telling us.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: RoScoLaz4

I doubt this was a meteorite ,




The vast, bright haze lasted for about 10 days. A month later, it reappeared for the same length of time. But it has not been seen since.


bbc website

what's interesting to me is that round thing, surrounded by the white stuff in the centre of mars ..



funbox


edit on 16-2-2015 by funbox because: addedwolfjjuice



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 05:07 PM
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I thought that Mars had no discernible magnetic field to speak of, hence the supposed loss of most of its atmosphere billions of years ago. That would surely preclude an aurora, right?



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 05:16 PM
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a reply to: Jonjonj
Mars has "pocket" magnetic fields.
www.esa.int...



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 05:17 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: VoidHawk

The tops of the clouds/dust look like they are very high, if the atmosphere is so thin then what is supporting them?
What "supports" cirrus clouds? Does gravity pull them back to Earth?

What "supports" mesospheric clouds high in Earth's atmosphere? Not much of an atmosphere up there either. They're a bit of a mystery as well.

en.wikipedia.org.../File:Iss017e011632.jpg



But ALL of the clouds you are showing us are within our own atmosphere, and thats my point! Earths atmosphere is as thick as soup compared to what we are told about mars, so looking at op's picture we have to wonder why whatever that cloud is hasn't been rapidly pulled back to mars, unless of course the atmosphere is thick enough to hold it there, in which case?



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 05:18 PM
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a reply to: anonentity




Clouds have been observed around Olympus Mons.

Clouds have been observed in various locations on Mars. Including from the surface.
mars.jpl.nasa.gov...



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 05:19 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Jonjonj
Mars has "pocket" magnetic fields.
www.esa.int...

Yep the vid below looks at why the fields are in pockets, its quite interesting.





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