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So, Who's Pushing The Boulders On The Moon ?

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posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 12:36 AM
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Well, who or what is it ?

I was recently browsing This Image and spotted a trail about 2 thirds up on the left hand side;



Then I looked further and noticed a few of them;



The images are from this site and are pretty cool

Personally I'm not prepared to believe that these things were so precariously balanced on their tipping point that they just fell over. If there was only one, maybe, but some, turn it up.

So what's the answer ?

Kind Regards
Myselfaswell




posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 12:54 AM
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Meteorites..you can see in many places where they have skipped along until coming to rest.
Some pretty cool pics/site.

edit on 16-2-2015 by vonclod because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 01:01 AM
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a reply to: myselfaswell

Interesting site
if this we're ejecta blanket from an impact i can see why they radiate from one central impact point
on a few of them i can see a 'rolling' imprint effect
however, this is does not the seem to be the case on all of them
also the 'tracks' seem to join together at some stages that are not really consistent with ejecta blanket's
as a question
the moon does exert a substantial gravitational effect here on earth
could the same be said for earth's effect on the moon ?

thoughts ?
FBJ



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 01:10 AM
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I do know there are pics of something leaving a track on the moon...even rolling down into a crater and back out again....it left tread marks or what passes for treadmarks moonwise.....



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 01:51 AM
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a reply to: myselfaswell

One theory I read somewhere regarding the moving stones at Racetrack Playa in Death Valley has attributed the phenomenon to a combination of freezing surface and high winds, it was when the surface was sufficiently dry (during the daily thawing) that it was able to produce a slippery-slide - like rubbing 2 blocks of ice together. Anyway, combined with a sufficiently powerful wind, even sizable rocks can easily be moved.

In this instance on the moon maybe a combination of freezing surfaces and whatever is left of gravity has caused the somewhat regular pattern in the tracks.

Anyway, its what first sprang to mind when I read your OP.............LOL - I'll probably get a Phage-ing in a minute.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 02:12 AM
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a reply to: Sublimecraft

Small stones, sure I can get that, however were talking about significant boulders.

As for the Phage-ing, unlikely. I experienced an attempted Phage-ing sometime ago, In This Thread, successfully repelled.

Anyway as far as meteorites are concerned, I'd say no. Clearly the following image shows a hill top with a short frequency of "footprints" at the start that decrease in frequency as the boulder has gained momentum.



Kind Regards
Myselfaswell



edit on 16-2-2015 by myselfaswell because: whateva

edit on 16-2-2015 by myselfaswell because: whateva again



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 02:42 AM
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a reply to: myselfaswell

I looked into these lines a while ago. There are heaps of them. I think they may be meteorites.
Some lines have ricks at the end of them and some don't. I found a few with boulders that were breaking down and fallen apart so thought the lines with nothing a the end , the rocks had already broken down.
Some leave weird tracks and appear to go uphill and even curve to miss craters so I don't really know.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 03:04 AM
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a reply to: ZeussusZ

Thanks mate but see the post above.

Kind Regards
Myselfaswell



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 03:07 AM
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a reply to: myselfaswell

Great choice of images. I think these are Lunar rilles. There's a better close-up here (Astronomy Picture of the Day ).

They run along for miles across parts of the lunar surface and haven't been completely explained just yet. Some of them only appear near areas of pyroclastic flow around major craters (mares) - the lower image (in link) highlights this.

Although many pictures look like a snowball has been skimmed across a virgin snow-field, it's worth pointing out that the rilles can be dozens to hundreds of miles long and up to hundreds of yards across.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 03:33 AM
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a reply to: myselfaswell

Meerkats

2nd line



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 03:44 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

Cool, but not quite the same thing I suspect.

Kind Regards
Myselfaswell



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 04:32 AM
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Perhaps the moon 'flexes' much like the inner moons of Jupiter? those Jupiter moons have rilles all over their surfaces.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 08:13 AM
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im pretty sure this one didn't roll , just look at the trail




posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 08:17 AM
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a reply to: myselfaswell

One thing that is sure, there will be no moss on these stones.

An interesting thread, and a mystery to be solved or explored further.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 11:15 AM
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a reply to: myselfaswell

Ejecta from impacts. Depending on the impact, the boulders thrown as a result of that impact could be large. When those ejected boulders come down, they can skip and roll along the surface before coming to a rest.

Some of those tracks could be many millions of years old, considering the Moon has virtually no atmosphere and is not impacted that often anymore (impacts that could create another layer of dust, obscuring the trails).


edit on 2/16/2015 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: myselfaswell

Angels playing golf. Hey, everyone deserves a bit of downtime.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 11:55 AM
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a reply to: myselfaswell

I believe moon quakes might cause some of those too



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 12:25 PM
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originally posted by: myselfaswell





One thing to think about... That line could have been there billions of years as a fragment rolled/skipped along after an impact. Not much changes on the moon.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 01:51 PM
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I believe the question of why is more important than who or even how.

What's the point of rolling a rock across the surface of the moon? A way to communicate "I am here" perhaps? Or maybe just..."Hey, let's roll these rocks across the surface so those 2 legged creatures on that planet over there will look up and ask others 'So, Who's Pushing The Boulders On The Moon ?'"


Nice pics whatever the answer.

Peace



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 02:19 PM
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originally posted by: jude11

Nice pics whatever the answer.

Most likely the boulders are thrown from crater-producing impacts (and thus have momentum to roll), or they roll downhill due to moonquakes.

As I said,the surface of the moon doesn't change that much over many many millions of years, so these rocks could have rolled a long long time ago, and haven't rolled since.


edit on 2/16/2015 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



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