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If This 1780s Southern Politician Fought Islamophobia, We Can Too

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posted on Feb, 14 2015 @ 01:56 PM
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Sick, day six, still feverish and miserable.....

I found a bit of history I'd never heard before and thought to share it.

talkingpointsmemo.com...


Let’s start at the beginning. By the time of the American Revolution, a sizeable Moroccan Muslim community—known as “Moors” in the language of the era—had developed in and around Charleston, South Carolina. Some of the community’s members were likely former slaves, but many others had chosen to immigrate from Morocco, with which the U.S. had a so-called “Treaty of Friendship.” Morocco, indeed, was the first African nation to recognize the new United States during the Revolution. Worried about being denied rights due to South Carolina’s system of slavery, a group of Muslim Americans petitioned the state’s courts requesting that they be recognized as white. A tribunal of judges led by prominent South Carolinian Charles Pinckney agreed with their petition, and the state legislature passed the Moors Sundry Act (1790), designating this Moroccan Muslim American community white for purposes of the law.




After the Constitution was drafted, Pinckney was tasked with taking it before the South Carolina legislature for that state’s ratification debate. During the debate, he was asked by one of the legislators about that exact Article VI paragraph, and more exactly about whether it would mean that “a Muslim could run for office in these United States?” Pinckney’s answer? “Yes, it does, and I hope to live to see it happen.” His words are inspiring, and a challenge to those who say they believe in inclusion today. How many white, Christian elected officials today would say “I hope to see more Muslim Americans in elected office” the way Charles Pinckney did?


Ahh - it's good to learn new things.




posted on Feb, 14 2015 @ 02:05 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

But isn't the South at the time one of the racist places in the US? I mean non whites have been treated as second class citizens from the founding of the US all the way to the 1960s.

So why would they contradict themselves?

In fun fact did you know they have the statue of Mohammad in the Supreme Court?
edit on 14-2-2015 by starwarsisreal because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2015 @ 02:09 PM
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originally posted by: starwarsisreal
a reply to: FyreByrd

But isn't the South at the time one of the racist places in the US? I mean non whites have been treated as second class citizens from the founding of the US all the way to the 1960s.

So why would they contradict themselves?


I doubt many in the south, South Carolina expecially, know about this. I'm fairly certain it isn't in textbooks that the author of the "..no religious test for public office..." segment of the constitition was from their state.

Who know, I often find people contradictory.



posted on Feb, 14 2015 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

Nobody's here Islamophobic or something. We're just Islamopissedoff because those pets just keep killing whoever happens to cross their way. And that's something our concept of ethics and reality of life on this planet just can't abide with. So, some of us has to part - and our vote goes - yup - for those other guys.



posted on Feb, 14 2015 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

Here in the uk there has been no middle ground regarding Muslims and Islam. Since 9/11 it's been active discrimination against anyone that wasn't a Muslim. No one can saying anything opposing it for fear of being labelled something, which is ridiculous. Everyone should be entitled without recourse to have and voice an opinion.

That doesn't mean hatred should go with those words or malice etc. reasoned arguments should be allowed even if it differs from another persons opinions and beliefs.

People are quick to point out certain problems wars etc about the Christian faith and yet forget the Islamic invasions of the past and other such things. Where there is a position of authority it will be abused by some person or another.

I'd like to see the replies to your O.P if a Muslim desiring the full implimatation of Sharia Law was elected president to the U.S.

Like all faith there are various interpretations. some are more acted upon than others.

Regards



posted on Feb, 14 2015 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

Our "leaders" have bent over enough for islam.



posted on Feb, 14 2015 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

The Confederacy's secretary of state was Jewish. Who knew?




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