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Sign of the Apocalypse? The Plague Is Back-"BLACK DEATH", With a Disturbing Twist

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posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 07:07 PM
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The BLACK PLAGUE has returned! We are living in the time(s) of the virus; this past year (2014) there has been an explosion in the intensity and the spread of viruses and I think this year (2015) will be even worse. I think this increase of viruses has to do with the warming environment because as you all know, cold weather keeps viruses in check. It's not looking too good, ATS.



Back in November, the island nation of Madagascar confirmed 119 cases of plague, including 40 deaths. But the bad news recently took a disturbing turn: “The fleas that transmit this ancient disease from rats to humans have developed resistance to the first-line insecticide,” Margaret Chan, director-general of the World Health Organization, said in a new report.

You probably recognize the infectious disease as the one known as the “Black Death,” which during the 14th century became a devastating epidemic that claimed an estimated 50 million lives throughout Europe, Asia, and Africa. Caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis, the disease spreads from rodents to humans via infected fleas. Those infected generally develop bubonic plague—exhibiting swollen lymph nodes and flu-like symptoms—or, if it spreads to the lungs, the deadlier advanced form, pneumonic plague. Caught early, antibiotics can effectively treat the disease; left untreated, however, plague kills 30 to 60 percent of those infected.


Just when I thought things were calming down, now we have the BLACK PLAGUE (BLACK DEATH) making a comeback due to a new mosquito resistance of the treatment insecticide known as Deltamethrin. This resistance build-up slipped under the radar of officials because of a lack of funding to monitor the area(s) where this type of outbreak can occur; namely, in Madagascar



A November 2014 study conducted by the health research center Institut Pasteur in Madagascar found conclusive evidence that more than 80 percent of the fleas tested were resistant to Deltamethrin, the insecticide referenced in the WHO report. Out of the 32 flea populations examined, only two demonstrated susceptibility to the insecticide. The report’s authors conclude, “In the…re-emergence of plague…in Madagascar, Deltamethrin is ineffective against fleas. Its use in Madagascar should be stopped and the control program for plague diseases needs to change to another insecticide.”


As the environment warms, man made warming or not, we need to nip this type of thing in the bud before things get out of hand. These environmental emergencies have been happening one at a time for the most part but what about when there are multiple happenings at once? What about Ebola, Chikunguya, and the Black Death at once? What about rising oceans coupled with massive earthquakes and tsunami's? There is no government or agency on Earth that I know of that is equipped to handle multiple scenarios at once so I think the best course of action is to stay ahead of the curve. Anyway, next up-the BLACK PLAGUE. What says ATS?

news.yahoo.com...




posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 07:31 PM
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Sarcasm or Serious?

These kind of stories are used to control the sale of antimicrobial soap and hand sanitizer.



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 07:33 PM
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Plague? Plague never left. It's endemic all over the world. The real worry with it is that it becomes antibiotic resistant. Then you should fear.



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
Plague? Plague never left. It's endemic all over the world. The real worry with it is that it becomes antibiotic resistant. Then you should fear.


The fleas which spread the virus have become immune to the insecticide that kills them so now they're re-producing and spreading the virus; not sure if that''s the same as anti-biotic resistant.



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 07:42 PM
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We could all become saints and avoid disease altogether... I love the accounts of certain ones in the time of the first Black Death where they licked and consumed the ooze from the buboes of the afflicted...even lepers, etc, and were peachy keen.

Also, they could occasionally fly... so there's that.



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 07:43 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

I used to play a flash game called pandemic. If you could infect Madagascar, you had already won...



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 07:45 PM
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originally posted by: eisegesis
Sarcasm or Serious?

These kind of stories are used to control the sale of antimicrobial soap and hand sanitizer.


Serious as far as i can tell. It's possible that fear is being used too control the population. It works everytime....



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 07:48 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

The fleas that spread the disease prefer their natural host to humans. That's why you and I and everyone else can live in close proximity to plague fleas and mostly never have to worry about getting it. It's when something happens that causes the fleas to leave their preferred host and come seeking other means of sustenance that you have a problem.


edit on 13-2-2015 by ketsuko because: Ugh! need to catch my own errors better sometimes.



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 07:59 PM
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The Apocolapse already happened, came and went right here on ATS. The "Rapture" is what you make of it. Life is Heaven? .......



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 08:04 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
Plague? Plague never left. It's endemic all over the world. The real worry with it is that it becomes antibiotic resistant. Then you should fear.


Is it a virus or bacterial infection? If virus, antibiotics won't help at all. (Unless secondary infection sets in that's bacterial.)



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 08:05 PM
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a reply to: new_here

Plague is bacterial. Y. pestis.



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 08:10 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: new_here

Plague is bacterial. Y. pestis.



Ok. Several posts called it virus, so I wasn't sure. Actually, this was in one of your posts...




The fleas that spread the virus prefer their natural host to humans.


Not trying to give you a hard time. Just looking to understand.



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 08:54 PM
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a reply to: new_here

If I said virus, I meant bacteria and didn't catch my own error. Oops! Thanks for catching that. But go look it up. It is bacterial.



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 09:21 PM
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originally posted by: lostbook
The BLACK PLAGUE has returned! We are living in the time(s) of the virus; this past year (2014) there has been an explosion in the intensity and the spread of viruses and I think this year (2015) will be even worse. I think this increase of viruses has to do with the warming environment because as you all know, cold weather keeps viruses in check. It's not looking too good, ATS.



Back in November, the island nation of Madagascar confirmed 119 cases of plague, including 40 deaths. But the bad news recently took a disturbing turn: “The fleas that transmit this ancient disease from rats to humans have developed resistance to the first-line insecticide,” Margaret Chan, director-general of the World Health Organization, said in a new report.

You probably recognize the infectious disease as the one known as the “Black Death,” which during the 14th century became a devastating epidemic that claimed an estimated 50 million lives throughout Europe, Asia, and Africa. Caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis, the disease spreads from rodents to humans via infected fleas. Those infected generally develop bubonic plague—exhibiting swollen lymph nodes and flu-like symptoms—or, if it spreads to the lungs, the deadlier advanced form, pneumonic plague. Caught early, antibiotics can effectively treat the disease; left untreated, however, plague kills 30 to 60 percent of those infected.


Just when I thought things were calming down, now we have the BLACK PLAGUE (BLACK DEATH) making a comeback due to a new mosquito resistance of the treatment insecticide known as Deltamethrin. This resistance build-up slipped under the radar of officials because of a lack of funding to monitor the area(s) where this type of outbreak can occur; namely, in Madagascar



A November 2014 study conducted by the health research center Institut Pasteur in Madagascar found conclusive evidence that more than 80 percent of the fleas tested were resistant to Deltamethrin, the insecticide referenced in the WHO report. Out of the 32 flea populations examined, only two demonstrated susceptibility to the insecticide. The report’s authors conclude, “In the…re-emergence of plague…in Madagascar, Deltamethrin is ineffective against fleas. Its use in Madagascar should be stopped and the control program for plague diseases needs to change to another insecticide.”


As the environment warms, man made warming or not, we need to nip this type of thing in the bud before things get out of hand. These environmental emergencies have been happening one at a time for the most part but what about when there are multiple happenings at once? What about Ebola, Chikunguya, and the Black Death at once? What about rising oceans coupled with massive earthquakes and tsunami's? There is no government or agency on Earth that I know of that is equipped to handle multiple scenarios at once so I think the best course of action is to stay ahead of the curve. Anyway, next up-the BLACK PLAGUE. What says ATS?

news.yahoo.com...


Actually, cooler temperatures are what enables the black plague to transmit to humans from the fleas that carry it. Nice try though.



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 09:29 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

The title has some punch


I actually think viruses are likely to expand their domain with a warming climate.
What's going to save your behind? Having and recovering from actual viruses.
infuenza
entero
adeno
roto

You thought I was going to say vaccine? LOL.



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 09:36 PM
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Nonsense story. Bubonic plague has never gone away; there have always been reservoirs of infection in India and elsewhere. The Black Death which devastated Europe in the Middle Ages is only speculated to have been bubonic plague; in fact, no-one knows for sure what it is. And of course, the Apocalypse is the result of early Christians eating too much cheese before bedtime.



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 09:39 PM
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a reply to: lostbook




It's possible that fear is being used too control the population.


They're sure trying here in the U.S. Over the years we've gone from Swine Flu to Avian Flu to Ebola and now Measles. Black Plague should be right up their alley.
edit on 13-2-2015 by DAVID64 because: typo



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 10:13 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: new_here

If I said virus, I meant bacteria and didn't catch my own error. Oops! Thanks for catching that. But go look it up. It is bacterial.

No I believe you!



posted on Feb, 13 2015 @ 10:21 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: lostbook

The fleas that spread the disease prefer their natural host to humans. That's why you and I and everyone else can live in close proximity to plague fleas and mostly never have to worry about getting it. It's when something happens that causes the fleas to leave their preferred host and come seeking other means of sustenance that you have a problem.



By preferred or natural host do you mean the rats? Because the rats are the ones who would move into populated areas searching for food; thus, infecting people. It could just be the latest doom-porn to hit the web but something that I think we should keep an eye on.



posted on Feb, 14 2015 @ 12:03 AM
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Antibiotics treat bacterial infections but not viral infections. The Black Plague is a bacterial infection. Now the bad news.

Fatal Superbugs: Antibiotics Losing Effectiveness



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