It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

WAR: US Marines TRUEX Boasts New Urban Tactics

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 16 2004 @ 12:46 PM
link   
In New Orleans, LA, on Dec 4-16, US Marines incorporated for the first time a few new features in their Training in an Urban Environment Exercise (TRUEX), including a live video feed of combat operations sent to the command post, and parachute insertion of reconnaissance and surveillance teams. In the first urban convoy with close-air support in a major US city, the MEU (Marine Expeditionary Unit) drove several vehicles throughout the City of New Orleans, both day and night, with aircraft support from several elements of Marine aviation. The operation centered on real-world scenarios and tactics currently used by enemies in the Global War on Terrorism. Please see original article for more details.
 



www.globalsecurity.org
The Marines of II Marine Expeditionary Forces Special Operations Training Group, who were responsible for administering the training, incorporated terrorist cells, hostage situations, chemical weapons, roadside bombs and improvised explosive devices in the exercise. Their intent was to test the abilities of the MEU and expose any shortfalls to be corrected before the MEU vies for its Special Operations Capable designation prior to deployment.

We came here to demonstrate a high degree of success in urban combat operations, and the Marines and Sailors in the 26th MEU showed themselves extraordinarily, said Col. Thomas F. Qualls, 26th MEU commanding officer. We were challenged by four STXs, with four R&S inserts, each with varying degrees of complexity. On each one, we got better and better.

To follow the 26th MEU through the remainder of the pre-deployment training and deployment, log on to 26meu.usmc.mil.




Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Interesting about the Pelican reconnaissance aircraft live video feed. Makes me wonder to what extent they would depend on this in an actual combat scenario. Also about the parachuting in of teams into a real world situation such as Iraq, are these teams not subject to sniper and ground fire while they are parachuting in? Didn't we have some trouble in WW2 with this? I can only imagine having to parachute in anywhere near a combat zone. It seems as though you would be an easy target, even though moving through the air. Do they actually teach paratroopers manuvers they can do while in the air falling that help you avoid being hit by ground and sniper fire? Just curious.

Related News Links:
www.usmc.mil

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
How Iraqi Urban Warfare works (explained)
WAR: Fallujah urban fighting spreads as rebels sneak into the city
flash urban warefare

[edit on 16-12-2004 by TrueAmerican]




posted on Dec, 16 2004 @ 01:20 PM
link   

are these teams not subject to sniper and ground fire while they are parachuting in? Didn't we have some trouble in WW2 with this?

Yes, but the airborne paratroopers were still abel to deploy behind enemy lines and the military was able to attack the enemy on two fronts (tactically anyway).


Do they actually teach paratroopers manuvers they can do while in the air falling that help you avoid being hit by ground and sniper fire?

I think not. They don't have much control over where they can land, let alone avoid enemy fire. The parachutes are moderately manuverable, from what I understand, but not particularly. Interestingly, parachuting seems to be replaced by air assault, where troopers deploy from ropes out of helicopters.



posted on Dec, 16 2004 @ 07:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by Nygdan

are these teams not subject to sniper and ground fire while they are parachuting in? Didn't we have some trouble in WW2 with this?

Yes, but the airborne paratroopers were still abel to deploy behind enemy lines and the military was able to attack the enemy on two fronts (tactically anyway).

My computer probably wont handle the video, so I haven't bothered, but I'm assuming we're not talking about your typical big round parachutes being used for an urban drop. More likely they would use the rectangular ones which can be steered to a certain degree.
Also consider the smaller number of men jumping (as opposed to a company of paratroopers) which reduces the reaction time for defenders, visibility of the jumping Marines, and chance of getting lucky enough to hit them.


Do they actually teach paratroopers manuvers they can do while in the air falling that help you avoid being hit by ground and sniper fire?

I think not. They don't have much control over where they can land, let alone avoid enemy fire. The parachutes are moderately manuverable, from what I understand, but not particularly. Interestingly, parachuting seems to be replaced by air assault, where troopers deploy from ropes out of helicopters.

I'm a big fan of air assault over parachuting on an open battlefield against conventional military forces. It can be launched from anywhere, can take a lower approach route, can get a look at the LZ before dropping you, gets you to the right place almost every time, and brings you down in the same place as the rest of your unit. I was very disappointed when the Commanche was scrapped because I had been very anxious to later see a stealth-designed transport helicopter for use in air assault.

The problem you encounter in an urban environment is that while low-flying helicopters will avoid radar and SAMs, they tend to stir up RPG-wielding guerillas very easily. For dropping my recon into a city ahead of a ground column I would favor the use of parachutes.

At the risk of sounding a little nuts, I think that if you really want your recon to get in quick, controlled and unnoticed that gliders might not be a bad investment- the drawback is that you need space with one of those things- you couldn't bring 30 men down in a small space using gliders.



posted on Dec, 17 2004 @ 02:23 AM
link   
One must not forget about the time-honored tradition of the "HALO" jump. High Altitude-Low Opening. Hauling butt, then sudden stop!!
The newer chutes allow a huge ability to maneuver, but with the HALO, it's just an added ability.



posted on Dec, 18 2004 @ 11:24 AM
link   
don't forget it's also against the geneva convention to fire on parachuting troops, not that the insugents abide by that.

-raven



new topics

top topics
 
0

log in

join