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Whats the real value of a job?

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posted on Feb, 10 2015 @ 06:23 AM
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unless it's doing what i want to do with my life--being a writer and create things. i don't honestly see the point beside for making green so that i can finance my education and buy the things i want to buy. i like some of the finer things in life and i'd like to continue to enjoy them throughout my life.




posted on Feb, 10 2015 @ 09:35 AM
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originally posted by: Hoosierdaddy71
a reply to: Yeahkeepwatchingme


Can you name a people or culture that you believe is not enslaved?



Interestingly, hunter gatherer societies were estimated to work 15-20 hours per week, but work was also defined a bit differently.

en.m.wikipedia.org...

www.psychologytoday.com...

I work in education. I have a job I generally enjoy, and the amount of money I am paid for my job is more than sufficient to meet my needs as well as saving a reasonable amount.

In my opinion, I would like to believe that job and life satisfaction are tied to feeling a sense of accomplishment, as well as feeling wanted and needed. If a company that employs people in an industry considered to be unskilled, and then makes the workers feel wanted and appreciated, they are far more likely to have a happy productive workforce. A happy and productive workforce makes a better company.

There is a huge imbalance between the current dominant economic system, and the satisfaction of those who live under that system. It seems that countries with a large middle class which have a decent trade off between work and home life are the happiest.

www.economist.com...


IN THE decade after Jim O’Neill of Goldman Sachs coined the acronym “BRICs” in 2001, grouping together four big countries with the potential for sustained growth, the “B”, Brazil, really put itself on the economic map. Having grown by 2.3% a year between 1995 and 2002, it grew by 4% annually in the following eight years. But Brazil then ran out of puff. It grew by a disappointing 2.7% in 2011, and a dismal 0.9% in 2012. Yet Brazilians seem blissfully unconcerned. IPEA, a Brazilian research institute, regularly finds that two-thirds to three-quarters of families say their financial situation improved during the past year, and that they expect it to get even better in the year ahead. In December Gallup, a global pollster, found that those optimistic about the economy outnumbered pessimists by a wider margin in Brazil than in any other large economy. Given that growth has stalled, why are Brazilians so happy?

The underlying reason is that even though the country as a whole is struggling, most families’ incomes are still rising fast. Unemployment is close to record lows and pay rises are comfortably outstripping inflation, partly because of big hikes to the minimum wage, but also because of that tight jobs market. Meanwhile, the gradual weaving of a social safety-net is rescuing many Brazilians from destitution. The result is falling inequality, a growing middle class—and a disconnect between GDP growth and most Brazilians’ actual experience.



posted on Mar, 1 2015 @ 12:16 AM
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you really could not have said it better. a reply to: onequestion



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