It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Nasa Reveals Far Side of the Moon in new Video

page: 1
26
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:
+3 more 
posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 07:14 AM
link   
NASA's new video gives us a fresh perspective of our old companion by using five-years of mapping data to give a view from the Dark Side.


Created using mapping data gathered by the space agency's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, the video shows the moon's "dark side" is not really always dark but goes through turns of light and dark just like the side that faces us here on Earth.

"Just like the near side, the far side goes through a complete cycle of phases," NASA says. "But the terrain of the far side is quite different. It lacks the large dark spots, called maria, that make up the familiar Man in the Moon on the near side."
www.techtimes.com...



edit on 9-2-2015 by gortex because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 07:36 AM
link   
Edit: Looks to be Tsiolkovsky Crater. Nothing to see here, move along.

This is pretty interesting.

At about the 1:40 mark i noticed something unidentifiable to myself, casting a nice size shadow in the middle of a larger crater. Might be whatever impacted and caused said crater or an alien pyramid. You never know. Pics below:

Zoomed out


Zoomed in



S&F
edit on 2 9 2015 by SgtHamsandwich because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 07:44 AM
link   
a reply to: SgtHamsandwich

most large craters have a mountain in the middle like Gale (crater)

en.wikipedia.org...

Everything hitting the ground from a drop of water to a meteor does something like this were a chunk of the matter is ejected from the center






__________

Where is the Nazi base

edit on 9-2-2015 by Indigent because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 07:46 AM
link   



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 08:05 AM
link   

originally posted by: ColeYounger
a reply to: SgtHamsandwich



Tsiolkovsky crater?


I do believe you are correct sir. After comparing a few other images from Google, it all adds up.

Good eye



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 08:09 AM
link   
a reply to: Indigent

Yeah, I didn't even think about that at first glance. I have not had enough coffee yet this morning.

As ColeYounger pointed out and I agree, It looks like Tsiolkovsky Crater.

I'm just going to put my hands in my pocket and whistle a lil tune and slowly back away from the thread.



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 08:16 AM
link   
great , now will the other side be available on Google Earth software ?



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 08:31 AM
link   
a reply to: gortex

great video - thanks for posting

just one point of minor pedantry though - the dark side and the far side of the moon are not the same thing anymore!

the far side is facing away from the earth and the dark side is facing away from the sun

i think dark side and far side did used to mean the same thing though 'when i were a lad'




posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 09:14 AM
link   
a reply to: Dr UAE

I already have it on an app on my kindle. Moon phases and a complete image of the entire globe.



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 10:19 AM
link   

originally posted by: Dr UAE
great , now will the other side be available on Google Earth software ?


erm...it already is?

People interested in what's on the other side might want to look at some of the early Russian images:

mentallandscape.com...

and also those taken by Lunar Orbiter:

www.lpi.usra.edu...

You can also get original books about the Orbiter programme quite easily



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 10:46 AM
link   
Being that the moon is tied to the earth by a magnetic orbit, I wonder if it puts stress on the earth at all if a big meteor hits the moon? I haven't heard of a big one hitting the moon in my lifetime. Maybe the lines of connection would buffer the impact's transmitted energy.



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 11:10 AM
link   
a reply to: gortex

Amazing that its loaded with craters. From all the stories that the dark side would be where extraterrestrial bases should be , I would say that it would be the most dangerous side to setup a colony ? or if we ever want to go there the side that faces us would be much safer in many ways like impacts and radiation IMO .

But nevertheless I would love to see some high res pictures of that part of the moon are they also available on LRO ?
edit on 0b14America/ChicagoMon, 09 Feb 2015 11:17:14 -0600vAmerica/ChicagoMon, 09 Feb 2015 11:17:14 -06001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 11:10 AM
link   
double post
edit on 0b38America/ChicagoMon, 09 Feb 2015 11:17:38 -0600vAmerica/ChicagoMon, 09 Feb 2015 11:17:38 -06001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 11:15 AM
link   
a reply to: Indigent

Question about the videos...

I noticed the balls and the water drop are from directly above dropping straight down. Is this how items impact the moon, in a direct straight line to the surface, or Is it more likely they hit at angles?

If you take the metal ball and allow it to hit sand at an angle, do you still get the buildup in the middle of the crater?



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 11:28 AM
link   
a reply to: 0bserver1




I would love to see some high res pictures of that part of the moon are they also available on LRO ?

All I've got is this image on the LRO site of the far side.

www.nasa.gov...



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 12:09 PM
link   
a reply to: gortex

YOu can zoom on LRO high resolution imagery of the lunar far side here:

target.lroc.asu.edu...

You can do the same with China's Chang'e-2 probe, though it is generally lower resolution (and in Chinese):

159.226.88.30:8080...

In response to other posters:

The moon is not held magnetically to the Earth - it's gravity.

Meteors are seen striking the moon quite regularly.

Meteors do not necessarily strike vertically, and produce slightly different features when they hit at an angle.



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 12:25 PM
link   
a reply to: onebigmonkey

Good link there for high-res LRO imagery. Another one is at wms.lroc.asu.edu... which actually shows the Moon as an orb. Enter 180 into the "Center Longitude:" field for the far side view, then zoom in.

It only uses the LRO Wide Angle Camera (WAC), but you can perform a search for NAC "footprints".

Here's an example of such an image: wms.lroc.asu.edu...



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 01:13 PM
link   
In contrast to the near side the far side looks relatively mild in the size of it's blemishes and craters. Could the much more extremely marred appearance of the near side be the remnants of destructive human activity? Perhaps weapons testing?



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 01:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: 0bserver1




I would love to see some high res pictures of that part of the moon are they also available on LRO ?

All I've got is this image on the LRO site of the far side.

www.nasa.gov...


What's to reveal if NASA had this picture for nearly four years now, does the video and the pictures from LRO coming from different satellite sources ? or did they compile this video from pictures taken from earlier stage?



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 02:46 PM
link   
a reply to: Xcathdra

At the moment of impact there is a symmetrical shock wave in all directions, the surface matter "push back" and this is how the backjet occurs, the impact surface is what makes the backjet in the exact center of the impact perpendicular to the surface because its there where the forces coming symmetrically from all directions collide.

Maybe not the most correct answer but what makes the backjet is the surface itself not the direction of the collision




top topics



 
26
<<   2 >>

log in

join