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Large Hadron Collider set for March restart at 13 TeV

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posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

You adress everything except the fact this can be done more efficiently without the collider.




posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 12:44 PM
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originally posted by: deadeyedick
a reply to: Bedlam

You adress everything except the fact this can be done more efficiently without the collider.
If by "more efficiently" you mean lauch several thousand tons of detector equipment into orbit, which must then by pure luck alone detect these collisions, without scientists ever knowing the starting conditions of the particles, or even what sort of particles collided.

Sure, efficient.



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 12:57 PM
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a reply to: ScientificRailgun

More spin

That is not what i ment or the only way.

How was this done before the collider?

The answer is on page 2
edit on 9-2-2015 by deadeyedick because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 01:14 PM
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originally posted by: deadeyedick
a reply to: Bedlam

You adress everything except the fact this can be done more efficiently without the collider.


On your planet, how do they define "efficiency"?



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 01:17 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

first let us agree that it is possible to do without the collider.

then perhaps we can iron out what it would take.
edit on 9-2-2015 by deadeyedick because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2015 @ 08:39 AM
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originally posted by: deadeyedick
a reply to: ScientificRailgun

More spin

That is not what i ment or the only way.

How was this done before the collider?

The answer is on page 2
Other methods of detection were viable before this collider was built because the tolerances for error were much more lenient when researching known particles in the "Particle Zoo". To probe the depths of particles that are still theoretical, or to plumb out why and how these particles interact requires much more sensitive equipment. There's a reason the detectors in the LHC are completely massive, and it's not because it looks cool. That size is necessary to have the kind of control over detection required to make valid, repeatable measurements. That's also a key word here as to why sub-orbital collision research isn't viable. It's not repeatable. It's by sheer chance that you would detect a certain kind of collision, and you can't recreate that collision at will to retest your measurements.



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