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Ancient Light Bulb

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posted on Jan, 22 2005 @ 10:57 PM
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The pyrimids also give off a low constant humming sound which we as humans are unable to hear, however animals will. this is similar to the process of gently blowing over the top of an open bottle though, if blowing gently, you won't hear the friction of wind and bottle, however a pet might.


could you give a link of humming i cant find info on that.

Its clear to me those were lamps depicted, even wires and battery!
Here is a old transformer or coil fashioned after serpents.




posted on Jan, 26 2005 @ 07:09 PM
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I will do my best to find info. on the humming phenomena, however remember i read this out of a book, so it may be hard. Most of the other pyrimids(others meaning p's in south america and peru, etc.) are also tuned in harmonically in weird ways similar to the great pyrimid(or w/e pyrimid i was talking about)lol.
Best wishes,
Dani

[edit on 26-1-2005 by Vesuvius 13]



posted on Sep, 9 2005 @ 10:32 PM
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Originally posted by Off_The_Street
"The battery has been recreated and found to actually worked."

Postulating that there really was a working battery, (and I think it's safe to assume so), most of the articles I 've read say it was probably used as an electro-plating tool. Building a light bulb, including machining a hard metal, drawing a vacuum , etc. is a lot bigger step than putting vinegar and bronze in a jar and sealing it with pitch.




Years ago, I read an article in Poptronics magazine that proposed that the pyramids as radio towers. Personally, I find that a little far fetched; but
also in the article was a very possible description of how a an ancient Egyptian lightbulb could be created.

Electrical wires would have been easy to make, just make a small ingot of copper, file a taper at one end and draw the ingot through progressively smaller holes in a drawplate, until it is the desired gauge. (a method thousands of years old, that modern metalsmiths and jewelers still use today, I should know , I am a metalsmith/jeweler)
The stand could be made of clay/ceramic (lighter and less heat conductive than metal, less prone to catching fire than wood).
The egyptians would certainly have been capable of creating a glass bulb, which doesn't necessarily need to be transparent, merely translucent.
Perhaps the wire were dipped in bitumen as insulation?
The filament would have been a thick, serpentine, copper rod, dipped repeatedly in a paste of lime powder and water.

Lime powder was the main component of the old limelight that were still used by stage actors as late as the 1950s.



As one final nugget of trivia, the term "limelight" comes from the incandescent light produced by a rod of lime bathed in a flame of oxygen and hydrogen. At the time it was invented, limelight was the brightest source of artificial light known. One of it's first uses was for lighting theater stages, and actors and actresses were keen to position themselves "in the limelight" so as to be seen to their best effect.


The egyptian limelight would have incandesced due to the heat and electricity transmitted from the batteries direct current, through the wires, into the filament. The heating of lime causes it to glow; the hotter the flame, the brighter the light.



posted on Sep, 9 2005 @ 11:38 PM
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I'm sorry but just what part of this picture even bares a remote likeness to it being a lightbulb?

We have a snake, symbolic or not, in a huge container held above a persons head. How is this expected to be ANYTHING like it is alleged to be?

Here's a whole bunch more of them...





Obviously then these are their true size otherwise they would be shown in different sizes compared to the people. Now what sort of light is it that takes a person to hold it over his head?


Originally posted by cimmerius
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There is a carving that shows an oval object with a snake on it.
Some have said it resembles a bulb with an internal filament setting on an insulating pillar and connected to an electrical cable.





[edit on 9-9-2005 by Netchicken]



posted on Sep, 10 2005 @ 12:14 AM
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Then what do you suggest they are?

It is not sufficient to say what something is not, without including what it might be, and what purpose it might have served.

Please offer an alternative.



posted on Sep, 10 2005 @ 01:04 AM
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Just because you do not know what they are does not mean that its possible to say its a lightbulb. Thats just insane logic, it doesn't even LOOK like one. I think its a giant gas cylander and the priests used to inhale the gas and get high off it. Thats where all the wacky pics come from.

Every now and then we get threads like this I remember one where something that looked like a helicopter was found in a hiragliphic prompting serious accertations that they had helicopters.

We look at the pictures through the eyes of modern man, therefore what we see we connect to what we have. Just because a debunked writer is using it to peddle his books does not amke it real.



posted on Sep, 10 2005 @ 02:13 AM
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Originally posted by isisraven
Then what do you suggest they are?

It is not sufficient to say what something is not, without including what it might be, and what purpose it might have served.

Please offer an alternative.


Well, you could simply read the hieroglyphics.

The images have a lot of text around them. They're like editorial cartoons -- the text next to them describes what the images are. Look... no, really LOOK at the "lightbulb." The "filament" is very clearly a snake.

Nobody puts snakes in lightbulbs. And we don't find the huge, glassy remains of lightbulbs around. And did you notice that NOBODY shows the pillars in a straight photo? It's usually taken at an angle.

That's because if you shoot it at an angle, you can ignore some of the features -- features that give more clues about the object. You can also pretend that the writing around it that talks about it doesn't exist.

Have a better look at the relief:
doernenburg.alien.de...

Notice that it has flower parts at the bottom. And, in fact, if you look at Egyptian depiction of lotus blossoms (not the flowers; the buds) you'll see that the paintings look similar. The snake refers to a known religious story -- a story that is referred to on the walls right next to the drawing.

www.catchpenny.org...

As this page explains, there's lots and lots of records of the tomb and temple builders being handed lamps with plain old lamp oil in them.
doernenburg.alien.de...

And the translations of the text right beside the drawings talk about New Years celebrations and all the formulas spoken to the gods. Not lightbulbs:
doernenburg.alien.de...



posted on Sep, 10 2005 @ 04:37 PM
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You misunderstood me, nowhere did I offer an opinion as to wether the hieroglyph is or is not a lightbulb. I was merely offering a description of how it could have been possible for the egyptians to make them with their level of technology.



posted on Sep, 10 2005 @ 07:42 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd

Nobody puts snakes in lightbulbs. And we don't find the huge, glassy remains of lightbulbs around. And did you notice that NOBODY shows the pillars in a straight photo? It's usually taken at an angle.

That's because if you shoot it at an angle, you can ignore some of the features -- features that give more clues about the object. You can also pretend that the writing around it that talks about it doesn't exist.


it's easier to see detail from relief art when you shoot it at an angle. Sometimes, also, there isn't enough room to get the entire area from a straight-on shot. They don't shoot at angles so they can get just the shot they want... they do it because of circumstance, or just so they can get anything at all. You can use a wide-angle lense, but you still can't get ALL of the picture... and most macro lenses distort the view... from a regular lense, you go to wide-angle, macro, then to a fish-eye lense that purposly distorts the image because of the extreme curvature of the glass. Most people don't use a fish-eye lense except for stylized photos... most proffessional photographers don't even own them, to tell you the truth.



posted on Sep, 10 2005 @ 08:08 PM
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Originally posted by Netchicken



What about the glass blowing technology to make the case, did they have that as well?

On this: the earliest glass blowing yet found only dates to 80 BCE. But, they cevrtainly oculd have used alabaster


What about the meterlergy abilty to manufacture the wire ? Did they have that?

Wire Making


How about the chemical ability to create batteries, or evidence of electricity creation via generators attached to water wheels, etc.? Where is the evidence of that?

The egyptians use powdered lime in glassmaking, and could have used it to make filaments. And the electrolyte could have been vinegar.


How about the non conducting casing for the electric wires? Is there evidence for that?

They could have used papyrus and mica as insulation, arrived at through experimentation.
Cellulose Insulation


Just WHAT evidence is there for their ability to create electrical light?

There is plenty of evidence that they had the ability and the ingenuity to create electricity and possibly lightbulbs. They either had; were contemporary with; or could have discovered through experimentation,
various means of electrical invention.

As I said, it is not my purpose to say that "they did", but that "they could have".



posted on Sep, 10 2005 @ 08:12 PM
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Hi there. Van Danigen(sp?) pointed out the wall paintings of supposed light Egyptian light bulbs. And though he has pointed out a lot of nonsense in his time, I have wondered why the top of the tombs lack any oil or darkened wax residue?

Dallas



posted on Sep, 10 2005 @ 08:44 PM
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Originally posted by Dallas

Hi there. Van Danigen(sp?) pointed out the wall paintings of supposed light Egyptian light bulbs. And though he has pointed out a lot of nonsense in his time, I have wondered why the top of the tombs lack any oil or darkened wax residue?

Dallas

Well, because you don't hang out in tombs for a long time and the oil was relatively sootless. However, yes, there are some wax residues inside the tomb and other places.



posted on Sep, 12 2005 @ 05:02 PM
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what am I missing?


A link

ROFL!!!



posted on Sep, 24 2005 @ 12:01 AM
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posted on Sep, 26 2005 @ 10:44 PM
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umm... ok, I'm confused... what was in the glass, was it a real clip, and where could I find the entire thing if it is real?
What I'm wondering is how much power it takes to work... doesn't look like it would work off of battery power, especially ancient batteries... almost looks like a plasma energy.



posted on Oct, 12 2005 @ 05:44 PM
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Whatever these things are, in the images provided I find it interesting that they are a) portable b) always held at the same angle, and c) always connected to a djed.

As an aside, the ol’ “If the ancients had a light bulb (helicopter, space ship, insert your high tech gizmo here) then they would have had lots of light bulbs (gizmos)” is a fallacy. Building on that fallacy doesn’t help. “If the ancients had (high tech) they would have lots of (high tech) and we would find the remains of (high tech) which we haven’t, therefore they didn’t have (high tech)”

It may sound logical to say “If they had one, then they had more than one” but that argument doesn’t hold a drop of water.



posted on Oct, 12 2005 @ 06:18 PM
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Wow.....this was one of the first threads I started on this site.....and it still gets some legwork.

So I feel a bit obligated to add something of what I have come to realize.....


Originally posted by torbjon
As an aside, the ol’ “If the ancients had a light bulb (helicopter, space ship, insert your high tech gizmo here) then they would have had lots of light bulbs (gizmos)” is a fallacy. Building on that fallacy doesn’t help. “If the ancients had (high tech) they would have lots of (high tech) and we would find the remains of (high tech) which we haven’t, therefore they didn’t have (high tech)”

It may sound logical to say “If they had one, then they had more than one” but that argument doesn’t hold a drop of water.


And I'm going to have to agree with torbjon here......if the egyptians had a light bulb.....or two, or three, or four......it does not necessitate taht they had many, many more. Think about it for a second.......

The egyptians had a social hierarchy that allowed for the encouragement of thousands of people to throw thier efforts into the building of the pyramids. And the pyramids are built almost ecstatically to mathmatical precision. What we can derive from that is the fact that the upper echelons of the society were well versed in math as well as construction technique. Which isn't new information, but to extrapolate further would allow for a realization towards the social hierarchy. And, in my opinion, that is where the interesting bits lie. In order to have people accept someone else telling them what to do, there would have to be a clear distinction in knowledge and relayable fact. Math and astrology/astronomy were the labors of the upper class.

The idea of electricity being harnessed by the ancients isn't that much of a stretch. The Baghdad Battery is an accepted piece of history, which is proof taht electricity was utilized. A light bulb isn't that much of a step.....we know they had glass work and various manipulations of other elements. If we accept the fact that the upper class has always been privy to it's own information pool, then we can accept what would seem like historical anomalies.......but I reject that they are historical anomalies! For the simple reason that in order for the upper/ruling classes to have any sway over the society/population, then 'proofs' or circumstantial evidences would have to have been presented. If noone knows anything about electricity back then, save for the few who encountered the passed down and 'traded' information, then the information could have been used to showcase a 'power' that the underclass would have no hopes of understanding......The prominence of the Sun God Ra could be explained in this fashion.......an understanding of astrology and star/planetary patterns could allow for the ability to predict eclipses.....if the majority of a popualtion at the time was not well versed in these facts, then a mystical portending could have been manipulated. And I believe that is how mysticism has been accomplished.....by a distinct, intended manipualtion of circumstances(social) surrounding not oft or well known scientific concept....before the term science was even a house hold word.....

It has been brought to my attention.....true or not....that the Free Masons held such prominence due their understanding of construction technique.....the kicker was that they never told how they did it so that other people wouldn't take thier 'job' or social status......at any rate, the point is several. You need to attempt an understanding of the evolution of our historical innovations.....the Antikythera Device is an excellent example of intricate metal work corrolated with math to showcase specific star patterns....and taht was two thousand years ago, if not more. And since two thousand years ago, mass production wasn't feasible, for reasons of resource and social hierarchy, then attributing something like a light bulb to the egyptians isn't necassarily a difficult step........just remember that there was no reason why they would have wanted anyone else to have the technology. Would have screwed with thier whole polythiestic social set-up....



posted on Oct, 12 2005 @ 07:22 PM
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I go along with the light bulb theory and the coments that it held a special place amongst the hierarchy.
The light bulb wouldn't have to last very long to impress the general populace.
A simple flash would do the job.
And perhaps we're talking about flash bulbs and not about light bulbs


I see comments that the Baghdad battery was used for electroplating.
Have electroplated artifacts from the era and area been found?



posted on Oct, 13 2005 @ 12:08 PM
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Also as an aside, whereas the images provided don't look anything like one, an arc lamp is an incredibly low tech form of electric lighting well within the means of any metal working society... no glass or vacuums or filiments required.

twj



posted on Oct, 13 2005 @ 11:14 PM
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I can't find it, but I came across a link from ATS somewhere that was a short clip of some guys making an ancient-style lightbulb... the "filament" was some root looking thing.... basically, it looked exactly like the heiroglyphs.... I'm trying to find the link now...





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