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Wolves as Pets. Tell us your story. Good or bad. Photos immensly appreciated .

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posted on Feb, 4 2015 @ 09:49 AM
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Before I introduce my "puppies" I want to address this bit here...


originally posted by: grandmakdw
There is a wolf and wolf/dog sanctuary near Houston Texas that can tell you all about them as pets.

The things that stuck out to me when I took the tour:
you can not housetrain a wolf
many half wolves are also not housetrainable
they can not bark, they can only howl
it is quite difficult to domesticate a wolf and one must always be on guard around them



Absolutely NONE of this is true...

Wolves, which by the way are illegal to have as a pet, are perhaps the easiest canines to train...for "housetraining" or obedience. I had a professional trainer tell me that my original WolfDog was absolutely the easiest she had ever encountered.

In any case...it is rather easy to teach a puppy that we don't "foul" the Den...that is actually something they learn in the wild...naturally.



Many of the dogs that are passed off as half wolf actually have no wolf in them.
If you can housebreak it or if it can bark then it is not a wolf or wolf dog, it is a dog that happens to look like a wolf



While it is true that some breeders do try to pass of dogs as wolves...it isn't all that difficult to know, or learn the differences.

However, housetraining, and barking are not on the list.

Wolves, and of course WolfDogs bark...for instance at the end of a "Howl" the pack typically breaks down into a "barking session" albeit brief. The reality is that Wolves, and high content wolfdogs typically don't bark, except when it is actually warranted. A warning bark, or an alert bark is more the typical. We have "just plain" dogs as well...they tend to bark at anything they don't quite like...my "wolves" will usually just stand there and look...unless of course there is something that shouldn't be...like a Coyote or some other animal that is about to infringe on "our territory". But, barking is rather rare.

Oh...especially when young...Wolves will engage in "barking" during play



In many states it is illegal to own a wolf or wolf dog as a pet.


Not true. While it is illegal to have an animal that is greater than 98%...virtually no jurisdiction has made the WolfDog illegal, though there are a few




Once a dog is classified as a wolf, it must be put down if domesticated in many states or sent to a wolf sanctuary.


Again; pure rubbish! I would defy any and all to actually "prove" my puppies are either Wolf or Dog. Course the reality is that the "common Dog" is actually a Wolf. If One looks at the genetic level, at what constitutes a "Wolf" they find that there is no difference between Wolves and Dogs. They are in fact the same species!

I have had, and raised WolfDogs for the past 30+ years. I actually wouldn't want an ordinary dog...something about the Wolf has spoiled me, and I prefer the Wolf. I currently have two; a Female (Ista) 11 years old, and a male Tanka; 4 years old. Both are very high content (Ista ~95%, Tanka ~ 97%)...I'll start something here to introduce y'all to my two best friends.

Although, I do not recommend them as casual pets...they can be more work, and a bit harder to keep. One must always be on guard against "escapes"...if a wolfdog is allowed; it will establish a hunting territory...placing your neighbor's small animals, and livestock at risk...and of course the WolfDog and owner at serious risk as well.

ETA:
Sometimes things are easier than I thought they would be...

If yall would like some pictures of my puppies...goto: pack.wolfmagick.com... ... for a while anyway.




edit on 4-2-2015 by tanka418 because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 4 2015 @ 11:23 AM
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a reply to: pheonix358

I am strongly against having wolves as pets for the reasons mentioned throughout the thread. Many "wolf-dogs" out there are actually dogs or mostly dogs, fortunately.

A friend of ours had two wolf-dogs, but they had proper enclosures and were educated about how they are different from dogs. Although wolves are like dogs, they are a different biological classification.

Differences Between Wolves and Dogs



posted on Feb, 4 2015 @ 12:57 PM
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originally posted by: boymonkey74
While we have no wolves roaming in the wild here in the jolly UK we have Foxes.
I have wondered why we can't have a pet fox...they are pretty.


Many people in The United States have foxes as pets. I would imagine as with any other wild animal, you would need a license to keep them. I have seen many vids on youtube and these foxes are like dogs and seem quite content. Again, you must have a lot of space for them.



posted on Feb, 4 2015 @ 12:58 PM
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I just want to say that this is a very interesting and informative thread about these beautiful creatures!



posted on Feb, 4 2015 @ 04:51 PM
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originally posted by: tanka418
...

While it is true that some breeders do try to pass of dogs as wolves...it isn't all that difficult to know, or learn the differences.

...

Again; pure rubbish! I would defy any and all to actually "prove" my puppies are either Wolf or Dog. Course the reality is that the "common Dog" is actually a Wolf. If One looks at the genetic level, at what constitutes a "Wolf" they find that there is no difference between Wolves and Dogs. They are in fact the same species!




No, wolves and dogs are not the same species. They share much of the same DNA but not all of it much like humans have much but not all of the same DNA as chimpanzees. I would like to see you produce scientific evidence proving that they are indistinguishable. You say this and defy anyone to prove that your puppies are either wolf or dog then claim you have hybrids. That's a contradiction. Using your own claims, you have no way to know whether your puppies are part wolf.



posted on Feb, 4 2015 @ 06:02 PM
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originally posted by: Tangerine

originally posted by: tanka418
...

While it is true that some breeders do try to pass of dogs as wolves...it isn't all that difficult to know, or learn the differences.

...

Again; pure rubbish! I would defy any and all to actually "prove" my puppies are either Wolf or Dog. Course the reality is that the "common Dog" is actually a Wolf. If One looks at the genetic level, at what constitutes a "Wolf" they find that there is no difference between Wolves and Dogs. They are in fact the same species!




No, wolves and dogs are not the same species. They share much of the same DNA but not all of it much like humans have much but not all of the same DNA as chimpanzees. I would like to see you produce scientific evidence proving that they are indistinguishable. You say this and defy anyone to prove that your puppies are either wolf or dog then claim you have hybrids. That's a contradiction. Using your own claims, you have no way to know whether your puppies are part wolf.



Family dog: Canis lupus familiaris
Timber Wolf; Canis lupus lupus
You may verify this virtually anywhere on the Internet...and you should.

Just how are they NOT the same species?

And you are very wrong about the DNA.

The differences between any given "breed" of dog and another is determined the same way as the origins of your families (both mother and father). This is done by selecting an appropriate region of DNA (Geneticists have done this), and counting the "alleles" at various "markers", also selected by Geneticists. From this One can tell which "breed" of dog the subject is, and what it's parents were.

After this data is collected, it becomes a matter of mathematics...

And no, technically speaking; they are not hybrids, they are a "mix"...not unlike a German Shepard and a Husky. The difference here is that its a German Shepard and an Eastern Timber Wolf. Both are Canines.



posted on Feb, 4 2015 @ 06:22 PM
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originally posted by: tanka418

Family dog: Canis lupus familiaris
Timber Wolf; Canis lupus lupus


The biological classification taxonomy you listed are correct, however, by their own wording, show that both the domesticated dog (familiaris) and the wolf (lupus) are two distinct subspecies otherwise they would both be listed as canis familiaris or lupus.

Further, it is believed that domesticated dogs are not decedent from extant grey wolves but come from an older, now extinct, wolf population that lead to both current branches on the canid family tree.


The analysis indicates that the dog is not a descendant of the extant (i.e. living) Gray wolf but forms a sister clade, and that dogs were originally domesticated from a now-extinct wolf population that was more genetically diverse than today’s wolf population. The dog's genetic closeness to modern wolves is due to admixture. (Viegas, Jennifer (January 16, 2014), "Dogs Not as Close Kin to Wolves as Thought", Discovery News, retrieved December 10, 2014)




edit on 4-2-2015 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer



posted on Feb, 4 2015 @ 07:50 PM
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originally posted by: tanka418

originally posted by: Tangerine

originally posted by: tanka418
...

While it is true that some breeders do try to pass of dogs as wolves...it isn't all that difficult to know, or learn the differences.

...

Again; pure rubbish! I would defy any and all to actually "prove" my puppies are either Wolf or Dog. Course the reality is that the "common Dog" is actually a Wolf. If One looks at the genetic level, at what constitutes a "Wolf" they find that there is no difference between Wolves and Dogs. They are in fact the same species!




No, wolves and dogs are not the same species. They share much of the same DNA but not all of it much like humans have much but not all of the same DNA as chimpanzees. I would like to see you produce scientific evidence proving that they are indistinguishable. You say this and defy anyone to prove that your puppies are either wolf or dog then claim you have hybrids. That's a contradiction. Using your own claims, you have no way to know whether your puppies are part wolf.



Family dog: Canis lupus familiaris
Timber Wolf; Canis lupus lupus
You may verify this virtually anywhere on the Internet...and you should.

Just how are they NOT the same species?

And you are very wrong about the DNA.

The differences between any given "breed" of dog and another is determined the same way as the origins of your families (both mother and father). This is done by selecting an appropriate region of DNA (Geneticists have done this), and counting the "alleles" at various "markers", also selected by Geneticists. From this One can tell which "breed" of dog the subject is, and what it's parents were.

After this data is collected, it becomes a matter of mathematics...

And no, technically speaking; they are not hybrids, they are a "mix"...not unlike a German Shepard and a Husky. The difference here is that its a German Shepard and an Eastern Timber Wolf. Both are Canines.



Do they ard sheep?



posted on Feb, 4 2015 @ 08:22 PM
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a reply to: pheonix358

I have had three wolves in my life.. each one had a story of his/her own. Socialization is of the utmost importance.. and they don't socialize outside of the family unit.

My wolves were socialized to myself and my children, and no one else. I kept each in the house during the night, but only had one wolf at a time..

If my kids had their friends sleep over, we had to be careful that the kids knew the rules.. the wolf would never let the friend (which ever one happened to be over) out of the room they went to sleep in without my express permission at that time.. which means I got woke up a few times to a child hollering, "I want to go to the bathroom!"

If people came over, the wolves wouldn't let them out of their car.. I would have to restrain the wolves in order to have even my mother over.. but for some reason my kid's friends were okay to a point, although we had to tell the wolves it was okay they were there..

but there was no petting or playing with the wolves outside of myself and my children.. but we were the family unit.. and they were all very fiercely protective of us..

The only time there was an exception to that rule, was the telephone repair guy.. craziest thing I ever saw.. we lived out in the middle of no where so the wolf would run free.. One day I wasn't home, and I guess the telephone repair guy came onto our land to do some work on the telephone box which was on the property..

I drove up to wolfy laying next to him, looking up at him as if he was some kind of a god.. lol.. all happy and loving.. and the telephone guy reached down periodically to pet him as he worked..

heck not even my own mother could pet him, and here was a perfect stranger just petting away.. I asked the telephone guy how he did it.. (ie: meaning even step foot out of his van onto my property with wolfy there protecting) and he said to me "how did I do what?"

lol.. the telephone repair guy was the only exception to the rule..

Wolves are natural hunters.. and nothing you can do will stop them from hunting if they run, so you have to be careful depending on where you are..
edit on 4-2-2015 by OpinionatedB because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2015 @ 08:25 PM
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originally posted by: Tangerine

originally posted by: tanka418

originally posted by: Tangerine

originally posted by: tanka418
...

While it is true that some breeders do try to pass of dogs as wolves...it isn't all that difficult to know, or learn the differences.

...

Again; pure rubbish! I would defy any and all to actually "prove" my puppies are either Wolf or Dog. Course the reality is that the "common Dog" is actually a Wolf. If One looks at the genetic level, at what constitutes a "Wolf" they find that there is no difference between Wolves and Dogs. They are in fact the same species!




No, wolves and dogs are not the same species. They share much of the same DNA but not all of it much like humans have much but not all of the same DNA as chimpanzees. I would like to see you produce scientific evidence proving that they are indistinguishable. You say this and defy anyone to prove that your puppies are either wolf or dog then claim you have hybrids. That's a contradiction. Using your own claims, you have no way to know whether your puppies are part wolf.



Family dog: Canis lupus familiaris
Timber Wolf; Canis lupus lupus
You may verify this virtually anywhere on the Internet...and you should.

Just how are they NOT the same species?

And you are very wrong about the DNA.

The differences between any given "breed" of dog and another is determined the same way as the origins of your families (both mother and father). This is done by selecting an appropriate region of DNA (Geneticists have done this), and counting the "alleles" at various "markers", also selected by Geneticists. From this One can tell which "breed" of dog the subject is, and what it's parents were.

After this data is collected, it becomes a matter of mathematics...

And no, technically speaking; they are not hybrids, they are a "mix"...not unlike a German Shepard and a Husky. The difference here is that its a German Shepard and an Eastern Timber Wolf. Both are Canines.



Do they ard sheep?


Only German ones...

But seriously, Wolves have been known to herd their prey into an ambush.



posted on Feb, 4 2015 @ 08:54 PM
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a reply to: pheonix358

Wolves are highly dangerous...they will kill a person as soon as look at them.. and most people who want one probably could never care for one. They are not easy, they are wild animals, and when you take one in, the best you can do is have it accept you, as a member of his pack..

the wild never leaves, you just become wild like him - is probably the best way of putting it.

For me, if the opportunity ever came up again, I would have another... but they are something I found that comes to you..as strange as that may sound.




edit on 4-2-2015 by OpinionatedB because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2015 @ 08:58 PM
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a reply to: tanka418

None of my wolves barked...

if there was danger, all you would ever hear was a low growl or a yelping sound like coyotes.. they don't bark nor do they bark after howling.. their vocal cords are not such that they can bark unless they are dogs or have dog in them.

edit on 4-2-2015 by OpinionatedB because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2015 @ 09:08 PM
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a reply to: OpinionatedB

Thank you.

First hand knowledge can't be beat.

P



posted on Feb, 4 2015 @ 09:13 PM
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originally posted by: OpinionatedB
a reply to: tanka418

None of my wolves barked...

if there was danger, all you would ever hear was a low growl.. they don't bark nor do they bark after howling.. their vocal cords are not such that they can bark..its impossible unless they are dogs or have dog in them.


Seriously you should have done your research first.

Wolves can indeed bark, they typically don't, at least not like dogs. You can "Google" that same information and probably should. Or you can ask a Wolf Biologist...

The bark is just a small part of the vocalizations that Wolves use.



posted on Feb, 6 2015 @ 09:53 AM
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a reply to: pheonix358

This is a very interesting thread on Wolves, I always thought you could just take a baby wolf and raise it like a dog.
But having read the links, and experiences people have personally had with them I see that isn't the case.
I will just add this passage makes more sense too me than it did to me before I read this thread.

Isaiah 11:6-8


Wolves will live with lambs. Leopards will lie down with goats. Calves, young lions, and year-old lambs will be together, and little children will lead them.
7Cows and bears will eat together. Their young will lie down together. Lions will eat straw like oxen.
8Infants will play near cobras' holes. Toddlers will put their hands into vipers' nests.


Interesting video on wolves and coyotes

edit on 6-2-2015 by Blue_Jay33 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 6 2015 @ 12:52 PM
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originally posted by: Blue_Jay33
a reply to: pheonix358

This is a very interesting thread on Wolves, I always thought you could just take a baby wolf and raise it like a dog.
But having read the links, and experiences people have personally had with them I see that isn't the case.


After 32 or so years living with the same Wolf(dog) family I have to say; that given my experience...you CAN raise a Wolf puppy in your home and it will turn out very much a well rounded, sociable canine. It won't quite be a dog, but, it can be just as "friendly", and sociable as any dog...it all in the "up-bringing". Treat it like one of the family, and it will be!



posted on Feb, 6 2015 @ 07:31 PM
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I have read this thred through and I find a lot of accurate info and a near equal amount horse apples. Let me tell you about our experience. I got a call from the manager of our local shelter. Jannie had a beautiful, about 2 year old, male Malamute-wolf mix and she didn't know what to do with him. She was afraid to adopt him out to just anyone for fear of an injury or law suite. My wife and headed to the shelter on Friday (always adopt on the week end so you can spend time with the pup to get them settled). As soon as I clipped a lead on him, and walked him in the wood we bonded. A walk with T became known as going for a drag.

He was undernourished and a little scrapie when we brought him home, and the first six month was pure hell keeping him in the yard. I finally resorted to a cattle fence charger, problem solved. I have a very large fenced yard for my friends to play in. I named him Thunder, because that's the sound he made running across the deck. T or Thunder weighed in at 155 lbs when full grown and he wasn't fat.

The challenges of a big dog were quickly over come with plenty of food, lots of love, and even handed and consistent discipline. House breaking was no problem as our female Norwegian Elk Hound showed T the ropes. We quickly accepted Thunder into our pack.
I would never give the impression that a wolf mix is easy in any way. Many are the times my wife and I questioned our decision to adopt such a magnificent animal. But without us I know Jannie would have no choice but to put him down.
He was big, powerful, and a bull in a china shop, at best. He was also my best friend. He slept by my bed for seven years. Three months ago we lost T to a tumor in his throat. I am a pretty rough guy and I cried like a baby. It's quite around the house now, and life is just easier, but I miss him like crazy, and I thank God for the time I had with my spirit helper. If you ever have the chance, give a wolf a break. They are not the evil creatures of children's fiction stories.



posted on Feb, 8 2015 @ 07:30 PM
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originally posted by: Ashirah
a reply to: Tangerine

I was trying to be open minded but I just cannot shake that feeling it is inherently wrong to keep these animals. I can see the appeal of wanting a one of a kind bond with such an animal, but ultimately, its pretty selfish to keep one enclosed without proper pack structure, diet and territory simply because one wants a wolf friend.

For those leaning towards wolf or hybrid ownership why not a Belgian Tervuren instead? Beauty and brains and bond in a 100% dog package.




I have a Belgian Malinois right now; and they're among the 'upper echelon' breeds - but in cases where you can provide the proper environment, there is still nothing like a true wolf, or hybrid for that matter.

I don't think that there's anything inherently wrong with 'owning' a wolf or hybrid; so long as you have respect for the fact that they are so primal, and that they must be respected as such. There are plenty of ways to make a 'dog' like this happy and unhindered - and if you can provide most of that freedom - everyone will be happy, even the 'detained animal'.



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