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Formula 1 2015 - pre season testing.

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posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 07:41 AM
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originally posted by: BornAgainAlien
a reply to: Psynic

The suspension was computer controlled, so every shock absorber knew what to expect and was put in the right position just before it. In 2-3 laps the system had learned what to expect and adjusted itself according to what would come.

F1 has always been incredible high tech.



Yeah, but not quite that high tech.

That's not my understanding of how 'active suspension' works.




posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:19 AM
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a reply to: Psynic

In F1 in the early 90s it worked that way, and it was called "active suspension," so I can`t make anything more or less of it.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:27 AM
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originally posted by: BornAgainAlien
a reply to: Psynic

In F1 in the early 90s it worked that way, and it was called "active suspension," so I can`t make anything more or less of it.


Nah, that's not how it worked.

Active suspension hardened the side under load during braking, accelerating and turning keeping the car level.

It didn't "anticipate" upcoming bumps in the track.




posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:41 AM
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a reply to: Psynic

Banned! Active suspension



Now the car’s attitude could be pre-programmed to anticipate changes in elevation and bumps.


Source



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:56 AM
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originally posted by: BornAgainAlien
a reply to: Psynic

Banned! Active suspension



Now the car’s attitude could be pre-programmed to anticipate changes in elevation and bumps.


Source



Feel free to prove me wrong.

edit on -06:0005152042015-02-26T12:04:05-06:00 by Psynic because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 12:05 PM
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It`s alive...



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 12:11 PM
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originally posted by: BornAgainAlien
a reply to: Psynic

The suspension was computer controlled, so every shock absorber knew what to expect and was put in the right position just before it. In 2-3 laps the system had learned what to expect and adjusted itself according to what would come.

F1 has always been incredible high tech.


So there were actually laser sensors that projected ahead to read the distance to the road surface.

It wasn't like the car "learned" the track "in 2-3 laps". The computer was never aware of the cars position on the track, just whether the surface ahead was + or -.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 12:15 PM
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originally posted by: BornAgainAlien
It`s alive...


Kewl!

It certainly worked well.

Do you think it's a feature F1 should have kept?



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 12:38 PM
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a reply to: Psynic

The Dutch guy you hear in the video did for years F1 (still doing it, but behind the decoder now), and they always had excellent pre-programmed shows about the technology.

While the video doesn`t show each shock absorber been programmed individually, it was actually the case, which they told many times before in the show and I remembered that. The car knew were it was on track after a few laps and what to expect.

I just read they are talking about maybe re-introducing it again, but I like to see the cars being more slipping and sliding when pushed, or else it will become just the same as an arcade video game.

I had a Sega Dreamcast (still laying around), everyone of my friends coming to visit had a big mouth they weren`t going to fly off at the first corner on Suzuka being Gran Tourismo cracks, boy they were wrong. This game was really more of a actual race sim as where GT was more in between arcade and sim.



They should not make F1 just like arcade games, where`s the fun in that ?
edit on 26 2 2015 by BornAgainAlien because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 12:54 PM
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a reply to: BornAgainAlien

I judge the merit of Formula 1 innovations on their applicability to the cars we drive.

I'm not sure active suspension would be something beneficial to the cars of tomorrow.

Smaller engines, improved durability, higher efficiency, electrical power etc I can relate to, but active suspension, not so much.

If it is too expensive for F1, I think it would be too expensive for me.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 01:01 PM
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originally posted by: BornAgainAlien
a reply to: Psynic

The car knew were it was on track after a few laps and what to expect.



The only way to do that would be to have some sort of GPS system combined with a precise, 3D map of the track.

They don't, far as I know.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: Psynic

If you look at the game I posted, in the lower left corner you see the flashing of all the assistance, TC, SC, ABS (the blue I don`t know anymore what it was). We played it with all those things off and did World record times driving at Monza (my friend said the whole time, and years later I looked it up and he was right). About 3-4 months later we tried again, but after 3-4 hours we were struggling to get even below the 2 minutes mark and quit it after becoming very frustrated (we were doing 1.46/1.47 minutes with the standard Dreamcast controller before after a few days of playing from morning to evening different tracks)...

Point being, you don`t want to have all things electronic helped out...they abandoned TC also later on in F1, because with them everyone can will able to drive those cars.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 01:25 PM
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a reply to: Psynic

The computer just needs to remember what comes next, a bump or a hole at a certain time, so it only remembers when going over it if the shock absorber was going up or down and was able to anticipate on that next time it came across that spot.

Basically it makes a graph with low and high in sequence about the elevation and pre-programs that into the car, it just needs to learn where they were in the few first laps.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 01:33 PM
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originally posted by: BornAgainAlien
a reply to: Psynic

The computer just needs to remember what comes next, a bump or a hole at a certain time, so it only remembers when going over it if the shock absorber was going up or down and was able to anticipate on that next time it came across that spot.

Basically it makes a graph with low and high in sequence about the elevation and pre-programs that into the car, it just needs to learn where they were in the few first laps.


You're going to have to provide a link for that.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 01:44 PM
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a reply to: Psynic

You can imagine yourself they had to drive a few laps to get the data where bumps were, but here`s another link...



Williams then took up the mantle and by 1992 had a fully-active system that could be pre-programmed to react to the bumps at any particular circuit.


Source
edit on 26 2 2015 by BornAgainAlien because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 01:55 PM
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Torro Rosso is now testing with a complete new car...

Toro Rosso brings 'brand new' 2015 Formula 1 car for last test



Toro Rosso technical director James Key says the STR10 running this week at Barcelona is "almost completely brand new" compared to the Formula 1 machine tested so far in pre-season.

The car features a new Williams-style front nose for the final pre-season F1 test of 2015, and also new aerodynamic packaging, cooling and suspension.

Key told AUTOSPORT this version of the STR10 is the one the Faenza-based team would race in Melbourne in two weeks' time, as it chases a target of finishing fifth in the constructors' championship.

"The car itself is radically different here, so we have to start again [in terms of set-up]," he told AUTOSPORT.


Source

Interesting, so everything we have seen so far in the two fist test didn`t tell us anything.

That would explain this...



"The Toro Rosso seems to be having all sorts of weird driveability issues. It seems to break traction and the rear steps out of line more often than any other car. I wonder if they’re trying some experimental throttle maps, because it looks very different to the Red Bull on throttle."


Source

Let`s hope it`s only the completely new car problems and not them having designed a dud...way too early to tell yet...but it seems they have been really ambitious with the car development.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 01:58 PM
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originally posted by: BornAgainAlien
a reply to: Psynic

You can imagine yourself they had to drive a few laps to get the data where bumps were, but here`s another link...



Williams then took up the mantle and by 1992 had a fully-active system that could be pre-programmed to react to the bumps at any particular circuit.


Source



Linky broky



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 02:08 PM
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a reply to: Psynic

Not for me...?



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: BornAgainAlien

Okay working now.

Again, nothing about the car "knowing where it is on the track" I'm sorry.

Sensors measure distance to the ground a few inches ahead of the car, and that's it.

As far as being "programmed for individual tracks" goes, all that means is reaction times and rebound rates can be preset.

The car doesn't "make a graph" or "remember" what's just ahead.

You have not posted any information on any mechanism capable of doing anything like that.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 03:05 PM
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a reply to: Psynic

Yes they were, you see at the video how the suspension system itself acts, the data given by the compressing or expanding can be registered...if it`s simply being logged for every millimetre it will know what the next few millimetres are going to be and can be made to adjust itself according to what will happen...no need for anything else as to what the shock absorbers are measuring, as long as there are lots of measurements.




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